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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Area reports: domestic 1978-79
Year 1978-79, Volume 2 (1978-1979)

White, Doss H., Jr.; Anderson, Walter
Maine,   pp. 243-248 PDF (555.7 KB)


Page 243

Table 1.—Nonfuel mineral production in Maine' 
1977 
1978 
1979 
Mineral 
Quantity 
Value (thousands) 
Quantity 
Value (thousands) 
Quantity 
Value 
(thou 
sands) 
Clays thousand short ton&. Copper (recoverable content of ores, etc.)
 short tons. — Gemstones                      
 98 
1,337 NA 
$160 
1,787 W 
100 
— — NA 
$164 
— — W 
90 
~ 
NA 
$163 
— — W 
Lead short tons_ 
118 
109 
Peat          thousand short tons. - 
5 
80 
4 
153 
3 
202 
Sandandgravel do._~ 
Stone(crushed) do...~ 
Zinc (recoverable content of ores, etc.) 
10,487 
1,312 
19,023 
4,110 
11,530 
1,655 
22,470 
5,510 
11,022 
2,069 
20,534 
7,492 
short ton&. — 
7,269 
5,001 
— — 
— — 
— — 
— - 
Combined value of other nonmetals and 
values indicated by symbol W        
XX 
12,955 
XX 
14,485 
XX 
17,519 
XX 
43,225 
XX 
42,782 
XX 
45,910 
 Total_____________________ 
 NA Not available. W Withheld to avoid disclosing company proprietary data;
value included in "Combined value" figure. XX Not applicable. 
 1Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production
(including consumption by producers). 
  243The Mineral Industry of 
Maine 
This chapter has been prepared under a Memorandum of Understanding between
the Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Maine Geological
Survey, for collecting information on all nonfuel minerals. 
By Doss H. White, Jr.1 and Walter Anderson2 
The value of Maine's nonfuel mineral production in 1978 and 1979 was $42.8
million and $45.9 million, respectively. Sand and gravel was the leading
mineral commodity produced in terms of value, followed by cement and crushed
stone. Other commodities mined or processed included clay, garnet, gem stones,
synthetic graphite, peat, and expanded perlite. 
During the 1970's, the value of mineral production increased approximately
50%, with an annual increase recorded for 8 of the 10 years. The value of
mineral production fell in 1971, a result of the 1970 recession, and value
again decreased in 1978, reflecting the closing of the State's last metal
mine the previous year. 


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