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Bureau of Mines / Minerals yearbook: Fuels 1957
Year 1957, Volume II (1959)

Young, W. H.; Anderson, R. L.; Hall, E. M.
Coal--bituminous and lignite,   pp. 41-137 ff. PDF (9.8 MB)


Page 41

General summary Scope of report 
Reserves___________________ Thickness of bituminous-coal and lignite seams_______________
Domestic production  
 Production by months and 
  weeks__________________ 
 Summary by States 
Number and size of mines 
Employment and productivity - - 
Underground mining 
Strip mining 
Auger mining 
Mechanical loading 
Mechanical cleaning_________ 
Page 
41 
42 
44 
46 
49 
51 
57 
60 
63 
65 
69 
85 
87 
95 
 Page 
Domestic production—Con. 
 Mechanical crushing 101 
 Treatment for allaying dust 104 
Production by States and 
 counties 107 
Transportation 116 
Consumption 120 
Relative rate of growth of min 
 eral fuels and waterpower 123 
Stocks 124 
Prices 125 
Lignite 127 
Foreign trade 128 
World production 131 
Coal technology 134 
491862—59-——-4  41PART II. COMMODITY REVIEWS 
A1 Coal and Related Products 
CoaI~-Bituminous and Lignite 
By W. H. Young, R. L. Anderson, and E. M. Hall 
+ 
Contents 
GENERAL SUMMARY 
THE BITUMINOUS-COAL AND LIGNITE INDUSTRY declined slightly in 1957 compared
with 1956. Production, consumption, and days worked decreased; however, average
value 
and exports increased. Mechanization continued to expand during the year,
sales of continuous mining machines increased, and the percentage of underground
production mechanically loaded and tons per man per day rose to new highs.
 Production.—The output of bituminous coal and lignite in 1957—
492.7 million tons—was 2 percent less than the 500.9 million tons produced
in 1956. The lower production in 1957 was due largely to decreased consumption
in the United States as a result of a general decrease in business activity.
 Production fluctuated very little during 1957. The only major fluctuation
resulted from the miners' vacation period of 9 days in midsummer. According
to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Commerce,
time lost on account of strikes amounted to 136,000 man-days in 1957, compared
with 377,000 in 1956. 
 Trend of Employment.—Employment increased slightly in 1957 compared
with 1956. 
 Index to Capacity.—As it is impossible for all mines to operate every
working day in the year, a conservative figure of 280 days for calculating
potential capacity was suggested some years ago by the coal committee of
the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers.
The average output per day worked in 


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