University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Digital Library for the Decorative Arts and Material Culture

Page View

Jones, Owen, 1809-1874. / Examples of Chinese ornament selected from objects in the South Kensington Museum and other collections
(1867)

Description of the plates,   pp. 9-15 ff.


Page 15


DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES.
PLATE LXXXVIII.
From painted china. The upper composition is
of the same Indian character as the last plate; the
little dish in the form of a star has very much the
same character.  The geometric arrangement of the
groups of flowers, without being rigidly accurate, yet
sufficiently so to properly balance, is most artistic.
PLATE LXXXIX.
From a large painted china Cistern. This com-
position is thoroughly Indian, like Plates LXXVIII.,
LXXX., and LXXXVII.
PLATE XC.
From a painted china Vase. A bold composi-
tion in the Indian manner.
PLATE XCI.
From painted china. The upper subject from
a small Tray, is remarkable for the way in which the
flowers fill up the space.
PLATE XCII.
From a painted china Vase. A
on the continuous-stem principle.
bold composition
PLATE XCIII.
From a painted china Bottle. There is much
of the Indian character in this example, particularly
in the detached flowers at the base of the subject.
PLATE XCIV.
From a painted china Jar. Composition on the
fragmentary principle; remarkable for the bold
treatment of the top and bottom of the jar.
PLATE XCV.
From a painted china Vase. Another compo-
sition on the fragmentary principle.
PLATE XCVI.
From a painted china Bottle. A singular com-
position; remarkable for the way in which the effect
of the strong colour of the ornament is softened by
the judicious treatment of the ground.
PLATE XCVII.
From a painted china Bottle. Composition on
the continuous-stem principle.  The ornament in
this example is in slight relief. The vase was cast
in a mould.
PLATE XCVIII.
Inlaid bronze Dish.
PLATE XCIX.
From a painted china Bottle.
the continuous-stem principle.
Composition on
PLATE C.
From a painted china Vase. This example can
hardly be called ornament: it is conventional
only in the way in which the leaves and fruit are
balanced.
Ornament from an Indian Lacquer Box,
15


Go up to Top of Page