Aligned 
First English edition of the Nuremberg chronicle: being the Liber chronicarum of Dr. Hartmann Schedel…
FOLIO CLXIII verso

Year of the World 5933

Year of Christ 737

Pope Zachary (Zacharias), a Greek whose father was Polycramus (Policramo), was elected pope after Gregory. He is reckoned among the best of princes; for he was a mild-mannered man, of wonderful sweetness and grace, and endowed with every virtue. He was a lover of the clergy and of the people. At the inception of his pontificate he found much internal strife in Italy. For the sake of peace he sent his legate and messengers to Luitprand, the Lombard king, who was at war with Thrasmundus (Trasmundum), the duke of Spoleto. But as he could accomplish nothing through his messengers, he, together with his clergy, went to the city in Sabinia, in order to admonish the king in person. It is said that eight miles from Narnia the king met the pope, and dismounting, followed him to the city of Rome. On the following day, under the office of the holy mass, the pope preached an excellent sermon, publicly indicating what it behooves a Christian king to do, whether in peace or in war. By these instructions the king was so moved that he referred all matters of war to the pope, awaiting his good judgment on those matters. Now when Zachary heard that peace prevailed everywhere, he undertook the erection and improvement of many various church buildings. He forbade the Venetians, under the pain of a curse, to sell servants marked with the sign of Christ, to the Saracens and pagans, as the merchants were accustomed to do. Since he was considered very knowledgable in Greek and Latin, he translated the four books of Dialogues of the Blessed Gregory into Greek.[This sentence is not in the German edition of the .] He died in the 10th year and third month of his pontificate, and was buried in the Basilica of Peter on the Ides of March. After his death the bishop’s seat was then vacant twelve days.[Zachary succeeded Gregory III in 741, and concluded the treaty with Charles Martel. Three years later, Luitprand, the Lombard king, died, and his successor, Ratchis, laid siege to Perugia. Zachary journeyed to Ratchis’ camp and not only induced him to raise the siege, but prevailed upon him to embrace the monastic life with his family. Then Aistulf succeeded to the Lombard throne, and he soon became more formidable than Luitprand. Zachary also died in the meantime (March 14 or March 22, 752), and was succeeded by Stephen II, who retained the pontificate for but three days. Then followed Stephen III, who is however, reckoned by some as Stephen II, the former not being included in the list because he was not consecrated.]

Year of the World 5943

Year of Christ 744

Pope Stephen (Stephanus) the Second, a Roman whose father was Constantine, was elected pope. He was so acceptable to everyone that they carried him about on their shoulders in the Basilica of the Savior at Constantinople. He was a man of exceptional Christian devotion and intelligence, a lover of the priesthood, a giver of alms, and an industrious preacher and writer of Christian teachings. He was a father to the poor, and a protector of widows and orphans. He industriously tried (though in vain), by words and gifts, to dissuade Aistulf, the Lombard king, who had attacked the Romans, from pursuing his evil design. Because of this situation he turned to Pepin the king of the Franks. To honor him, Pepin sent his son Charles the younger (who by reason of his accomplishments was called the Great) to the hundredth stone to visit him. But Pepin dismounted from his horse at the third stone from the city of Rome, kissed the feet of this holy man, and led his horse by the bridle up to the Roman palace. And before long this pope anointed Pepin as a king and diverted the empire from the warring factions in France. After many good works he died in the fifth year and first month of his pontificate, and was buried in the Basilica of Peter to the tears of all on the sixth day of the Kalends of May. Then the seat was vacant for thirty-two days.[Stephen II (pope from March 752 to April 757), implored the protection of Pepin, the French king, when Aistulf threatened to put all the Romans to the sword should they refuse to acknowledge him as their master. Pepin promised assistance, and in return Pepin was anointed by the pope; also his sons Charles and Carloman. In 755 Aistulf, by force of arms, was compelled to promise restoration of all the possessions of the church which he had seized; but as soon as Pepin left France, Aistulf laid siege to Rome, plundered and set fire to the churches, burnt the images, and devastated the surrounding country. Pepin again entered Italy and compelled Aistulf to restore the property of the Church. In 757 Stephen died, and was succeeded by his brother Paul I.]

Pope Paul the First, a Roman whose father was Constantine, brother of the aforesaid Stephen, succeeded him as pope. He was a very kind and good man, and well, versed in the ecclesiastical doctine of the patriarchate under popes Gregory the Second and Zachary. The latter, in fact, made him, together with his brother, a deacon. But, at the death of his brother, when he was being sought as his successor as pope, there were those who preferred the archdeacon Theophylactus. After a long struggle he alone, on account of the integrity of his life and his learning, was made pope by the votes of all good men in the time of (the emperors) Constantine and Leo.[In the first part of this paragraph, the following is not in the German edition of the :

…under popes Gregory the Second and Zachary. The latter, in fact, made him, together with his brother, a deacon. But, at the death of his brother, when he was being sought as his successor as pope, there were those who preferred the archdeacon Theophylactus. After a long struggle he alone, on account of the integrity of his life and his learning, was made pope by the votes of all good men in the time of (the emperors) Constantine and Leo.
] He was, moreover, an imitator of our Savior; for he never gave evil for evil, but overcame evil by kindness. He was such a good and benevolent man that at night, accompanied by two or three servants he visited the sickbeds of the poor; and he comforted everyone with words for their recovery and with alms. He ransomed prisoners from foreign lands, and protected widows and orphans and sustained them with alms. With his assembled clergy and all the Roman people, he transferred the body of the Blessed Petronella, Peter’s daughter, together with its marble sepulcher inscribed with these letters: (This is the sepulcher) of Petronella, sweetest daughter. He transferred the boy from the Appian Way to the Vatican with all the priests singing (as is commonly the case) and with the people leading the celebration. And he placed that very holy body itself in the temple of Apollo at the head of the basilica dedicated to her father. And Paul died in the Basilica of Paul on the Via Ostiense, after having restored certain churches that were falling into ruin on account of their antiquity, in the tenth year and first month of his pontificate. And his body was carried to the Vatican with great and solemn ceremony. Then the seat was vacant for one year and 1 month.

Paul I (pope from 757 to 767) succeeded his brother Stephen III. His pontificate was distinguished partly by earnest efforts for the complete and secure possession of the territories which had been granted by the Frankish king, and partly by the growth of the papal power in Rome itself. Paul died in 767, and was succeeded by Stephen IV (or as some reckon, Stephen III).

In this paragraph, nearly all of the passage cited below except for the italicized words is not in the German edition of the Chronicle:

…together with its marble sepulcher inscribed with these letters: (This is the sepulcher) of Petronella, sweetest daughter. He transferred the boy from the Appian Way to the Vatican with all the priests singing (as is commonly the case) and with the people leading the celebration. And he placed that very holy body itself in the temple of Apollo at the head of the basilica dedicated to her father. And Paul died in the Basilica of Paul on the Via Ostiense, after having restored certain churches that were falling into ruin on account of their antiquity, in the tenth year and first month of his pontificate. And his body was carried to the Vatican with great and solemn ceremony.