Aligned 
First English edition of the Nuremberg chronicle: being the Liber chronicarum of Dr. Hartmann Schedel…
FOLIO CCLXXI recto

while others which were small now appear large and flourishing. Lombardy, Romandiola, Insubria, Lemilia, and Flamina, the Italian regions, being unrenowned, were not recognized. And so also Macedonia, once under a king called Aemathione, and by him named Aemathia, was insignificant; but later it expanded through the power of its rulers and the skill of its people, and by the attraction of its neighbors. Therefore, if those who read my account do not here find them in the order to which they are accustomed, or in which they find them among other writers, I hope they will not blame me, but keep in mind the reason above mentioned, namely, the changing character of these regions.

THRACE

THRACE (Thracia), as many distinguished writers state, is a vast province or country. To the East is the Euxine Sea, to the South the Aegean, the river Strymon and the Macedonian plains; to the North is the Danube, and to the West the Paeonian Mountains, Hungary and the Save. So said the historians, Pliny and Strabo, who stated that Mt. Remus divides Thrace through the middle, and that the Dardani, Tribaili, and Moesians live in Thrace; that the Triballi lived in the plains, now inhabited by the Rascini or Haiti, or Servi; but the Moesians, after the Triballi, spread out to the East as far as the Euxine, between the Danube and Mt. Hemus, and these we now call the Bulgarians. Beyond this, to the South, and as far as Hellespontum lies Roumania, a Greek nation, though somewhat barbarian; and in our time, after the destruction of the Greek Empire, they again became barbarian under the rule of the Turks. The principal city of this country is Constantinople, formerly called Agios. This city was built by the Lacedaemonians under their leader Pausanius. Of this city, its origin, name and existence, sufficient mention has already been made in this book in the form in which these were described by Aeneas; wherefore his writings have not been repeated here.