Sigrid Schultz Papers, 1835-1980


Summary Information
Title: Sigrid Schultz Papers
Inclusive Dates: 1835-1980

Creator:
  • Schultz, Sigrid, 1893-1980
Call Number: Mss 677; PH 3750-PH 3754; PH 3813-PH 3815; Audio 1009A; Micro 777; M91-057

Quantity: 17.4 cubic feet (51 archives boxes and 2 flat boxes), 1 reel of microfilm (35 mm), 1 tape recording, 814 photographs, 30 postcards, 1 photostat, and 13 color plates; plus additions of 1909 photographs, and 92 negatives

Repository:
Archival Locations:
Wisconsin Historical Society (Map)

Abstract:
Papers documenting the personal and business life of Sigrid Schultz, an American-born foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune who served as bureau chief in Berlin from 1926 to 1941, and was an author, radio broadcaster, and lecturer. Included also are materials generated by her parents, Hermann and Hedwig Schultz, and by her maternal forebears, the Jaskewitz family. Extensive correspondence includes family exchanges; letters from colleagues and friends such as Hans von Kaltenborn, Louis Lochner, William Shirer, and Wallace Deuel; and business letters to and from the Tribune's controversial owner, Col. Robert McCormick, and colleagues such as Floyd Gibbons, Richard Henry Little, J. Loy Maloney, Joseph Pierson, George Seldes, and George Scharschug. Other professional records document Schultz's involvement with the Overseas Press Club. The Jaskewitz family materials include correspondence and papers about their theatrical and musical work in Germany. Photographs include images of the Schultz family and friends, circa 1890-1976.

Language: English, German

URL to cite for this finding aid: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/wiarchives.uw-whs-mss00677
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Biography/History

Sigrid Lillian Schultz was born on January 15, 1893 in Chicago, where her Norwegian-born father, the artist Hermann Schultz, had come to paint during the Chicago World's Fair. Her mother, Hedwig Jaskewitz, was eleven years her husband's junior. Born in Wiesbaden, she had once been among his portrait sitters as he traveled throughout the European continent. After Sigrid's birth, the Schultzes settled in the northern Chicago neighborhood of Summerdale. There Sigrid grew up in a tri-lingual environment (English, German, and French) among the artists, politicians, musicians, and others who frequented the Schultz home.

In 1901 the family sailed for Europe. Although they settled in Paris, Mr. Schultz resumed his artistic travels throughout Europe and the Middle East, painting royalty and commoners. In 1911 Sigrid graduated from the Lycée Racine in Paris; three years later she received a diploma from the Sorbonne. Often during these years she battled ill health in Switzerland.

In 1914 mother and daughter journeyed to Hermann Schultz's Berlin studio; but when war was declared they were unable to flee due to his ill health. Instead, the family spent the war years in Berlin as virtual prisoners, reporting twice a day to the police. During this time, Sigrid worked as a French and English language tutor. In 1917 she worked for the mayor of Baghdad (who was also stranded in Berlin), attended courses in international law at Berlin University, and translated her course notes for him into French.

Through friends in 1919 she was introduced to Richard Henry Little of the Chicago Tribune, and she immediately became his assistant and interpreter. Her natural inquisitiveness, familiarity with German society, and talent for language enabled Sigrid to develop into an excellent newspaperwoman. In 1926 Sigrid was appointed the Tribune's correspondent-in-chief for Central Europe; no other woman journalist in Europe at that time held such an important position. From this vantage point, she was able to witness the rise of the Nazi Party. In 1930 she was befriended by Hermann Goering, who for many years thereafter attended her dinner parties and proved to be a great source for her “scoops.” In 1932 Sigrid met Adolf Hitler for the first time.

Hedwig, who became a widow in 1924, remained with Sigrid in Berlin until 1936, when the two sailed to the United States. Sigrid then purchased a house in Westport, Connecticut, for her mother and returned to Berlin. Because of her anti-Nazi stance, she came under continual observation by the Gestapo. Often she was forced to travel out of Germany to file news reports; many of those stories appeared under her pseudonym, John Dickson.

During the Munich Conference of 1938, Sigrid added broadcasting to her regular news assignments. As a radio correspondent for the Mutual Broadcasting Company until 1941, she risked her life during the bombing of Berlin to provide on-the-spot coverage. In 1940 she suffered a shrapnel injury which was to trouble her for the rest of her life. Sigrid left Germany in February 1941 for what she expected would be a brief vacation. Instead, she became very ill and went to Westport to recuperate.

During the war, Sigrid lectured throughout the United States on the horrors of Nazi Germany. In 1944 she authored Germany Will Try It Again, warning the Allies not to allow Germany to rearm. Later that same year she returned to Europe as a war correspondent for McCall's and the Tribune. While covering the advance of the First and Third armies, Sigrid was among the first to enter Buchenwald concentration camp. After her return to Westport in 1945, she began work on several books on post-war Germany, none of which were published.

Although she made another trip to Germany in 1952-1953 as a correspondent, Sigrid spent most of the post-war years working on scores of unpublished articles, manuscripts, and memoirs. After her mother's death in 1960, Schultz became involved with the Overseas Press Club, and she served as editor of the Cookbook, headed the Insurance Committee, served on numerous awards committees, and contributed to two additional publications, I Can Tell It Now (1964) and Newsbreak (1974). Although suffering from arthritis and heart problems, in her later years she maintained an avid correspondence with friends such as the Wallace Deuels and Bella Fromm Wells. She died on May 14, 1980, still at work on her autobiography.

Scope and Content Note

The collection provides very complete documentation of the personal and business life of Sigrid Schultz, and consists of papers she generated as well as many items she collected. A large portion of the collection consists of personal and professional correspondence dating from her childhood until the day before her death in 1980. Writings, many of which were unpublished, comprise another large section of the collection. Taken together, the writings are an important source for information on her experiences in pre-war Germany and her opinions and observations of post-war events in that country.

The collection is divided into: BIOGRAPHICAL MATERIAL, CHICAGO TRIBUNE MATERIAL, GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE, FINANCIAL RECORDS, GENERAL FILES, OVERSEAS PRESS CLUB MATERIAL, PERSONAL WRITINGS, COLLECTED PAPERS, FAMILY PAPERS, and PHOTOGRAPHS: ADDITIONS.

BIOGRAPHICAL MATERIAL contains documentation relating to her personal life, such as awards, Christmas card lists and addresses, menus, horoscopes, and passports and identity cards. There is also material on her house in Westport, Connecticut, and its contents. Of greater interest are notes on interviews she conducted and transcripts of interviews with her in the 1970s. (One of these concerns her recollections of the treatment of Jews in Nazi Germany, another is on the history of the Tribune, and a third is available only in recorded form.) Also listed here are numerous photographs of the Sigrid and the Schultz family, their pets, and the house in Westport, Connecticut. There are some early photographs of Hermann Schultz's studio and two albums of his portrait subjects, as well as theatrical shots of members of the Jaskewitz family, circa 1850s.

The CHICAGO TRIBUNE MATERIAL is comprised of documents generated during nearly thirty years of employment with the company. The correspondence here, 1919-1978, is especially rich, including letters from supervisors and colleagues such as Floyd Gibbons, Richard Henry Little, J. Loy Maloney, Joseph Pierson, George Seldes, and George Scharschug and numerous items to and from the Tribune's controversial owner, Col. Robert McCormick. The correspondence to the Tribune often includes detailed background information on the filing of particular stories, news concerning the activities of other employees, and her personal perspective on events. The incoming coverage from Chicago contains numerous examples of instructions concerning particular stories and information on the management of the paper in general. Available only on microfilm are scrapbooks of Schultz's stories published in the Tribune for the period 1934 to 1939. The series also includes statements by Germans for publication, 1920-1923; feature stories and fillers she mailed from Berlin, 1920-1941; World War II stories cabled to the United States in 1945; a column about the social and cultural activities of Americans in Berlin, 1925-1928; and material for the Tribune's book, History of the War, to which she contributed.

The GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE series is divided into business letters that do not concern the Tribune, personal correspondence, and general mail. (Letters to and from her immediate family are in the Schultz Family material.)

The bulk of this section is the personal correspondence, some of which is in German. Letters to and from more than forty of Sigrid Schultz's most prominent friends and colleagues are arranged alphabetically by name, while correspondence to and from other individuals is arranged chronologically under the heading of general correspondence. The personal correspondence with the Wallace and Mary Deuel family, 1948-1980, is especially extensive. Also notable are exchanges with musician Janet Fairbank, Hans V. Kaltenborn, William Laidlaw, Louis Lochner, Barney Oldfield, William L. Shirer, and Gregor Ziemer.

Much of the business correspondence is from book and magazine publishers, although there are items concerning the Mutual Broadcasting System, the New York Times, and the U.S. government. Also included are contracts and correspondence with W. Colston Leigh Inc., and Charles Pearson, the two firms that represented Schultz as a lecturer during the 1940s. Correspondence, 1934-1956, with McIntosh and Otis Inc. (her literary agent) is included here as well.

The FINANCIAL RECORDS provide excellent documentation of financial matters from 1938 to 1980. Especially useful are the daily and monthly spending logs, 1942-1964; correspondence with banks and the IRS, 1933-1976; income tax returns and attached schedules, 1941-1979; and miscellaneous information about insurance and stock holdings.

The GENERAL FILES series contains miscellaneous papers collected by Sigrid Schultz which contain some details about her activities. Included are calling cards and invitations, circa 1920-1940; lecture programs and advertisements, 1941-1963; menus from dinners she attended (with accompanying notes on the dinner speakers and her tablemates); and materials about ocean travel such as passenger lists and menus.).

The OVERSEAS PRESS CLUB MATERIAL is comprised of papers dating from 1942 to 1980, although most of her activity with the club occurred from 1957 to 1964. Much of the series is comprised of correspondence and papers (including anecdotes, recipes, reviews, and a typed manuscript) from the Cookbook (1957-1967) and correspondence and drafts of chapters pertaining to I Can Tell It Now (1964) and Newsbreak (1974). Also included are general correspondence and materials on the OPC Awards Committee and dinner programs. Unfortunately no printed copy of the OPC Cookbook is available.

The largest series in the collection, PERSONAL WRITINGS, is chiefly comprised of unpublished material. The majority of this writing took place after World War II when she primarily worked as a free-lance writer, and it generally reflects her expertise and interest in twentieth century German history and politics.

The PERSONAL WRITINGS are arranged alphabetically by genre as articles, books, book reviews, daily logs and diaries, motion picture scenarios, notes and nore as articles, books, book reviews, daily logs and diaries, motion picture scenarios, notes and notebooks, radio broadcasts, and speeches and lectures. Researchers should be advised, however, that because of the unusually disordered condition in which the papers were received and because of Schultz's penchant for reworking ideas the identification of the genre may not be correct. The designation of the memoirs genre is particularly imprecise because the majority of Schultz's post-war writing was highly personal, containing a great deal of information based on her own experiences or her particular perspective on post-war foreign affairs.

The collection contains more than one hundred articles, several written under a pseudonym and many of which are untitled. There are also chapter outlines and drafts for three unpublished books, “Triple Threat,” “New Watch on the Rhine,” and a work on the German Underground. Correspondence and reviews for her published book, Germany Will Try It Again (1944) are also included, although no manuscripts for the book were received with the papers, as these were presumably sold as part of a World War II fund drive. A published copy of this book is available in the University Library.

Especially valuable within the writings are the diaries and logs, some of which she transcribed to facilitate work on her memoirs; manuscript drafts and hundreds of loose pages and fragments from her unpublished memoir; typed and handwritten notes and notebooks; radio broadcasts, and speeches and lectures.

The COLLECTED PAPERS consist of a variety of material gathered by Schultz during the course of her career. In general these consist of research material and original documentation uncovered in her reporting work, although the connection to Schultz's work is not always apparent. The collected files are arranged as alphabetical subject files and writings by others. A large library of German books and imprints acquired for similar purposes was separated to the University of Wisconsin Library. Several categories of photographic prints and albums also collected in Germany by Schultz and her father (including photographs of Buchenwald, Hitler, the eastern front during World War I, angora rabbit raising in German concentration camps, and other topics) have been removed from the Schultz collection and separately catalogued.

The FAMILY PAPERS include material generated or collected by Hermann and Hedwig Schultz and by Mrs. Schultz's family, the Jaskewitzes. Of special note is the correspondence among the immediate family, 1884-1954, including the love letters of Hermann and Hedwig (in German) and an almost daily run of letters between Sigrid and Hedwig from the mid 1930s through the early 1940s. Also included are letters written to other relatives from her early childhood until 1917.

The papers of Hedwig Schultz include general correspondence, 1938-1960 (including a substantial number of letters from Mary Deuel and letters received upon Hedwig's death); daily logs and diaries, 1902-1959; and notebooks, 1941-1953. Material on Hermann Schultz include address books; biographical papers; daily logs and diaries, 1888-1923; photographs; and numerous sketch books (which also contain extensive notes). Jaskewitz family papers include biographical materials; correspondence, 1835-1908; and theatre programs featuring members of the family, 1836-1882.

Administrative/Restriction Information
Acquisition Information

Presented by Sigrid Schultz, Westport, Connecticut, 1965, 1980, and by Cynthia Chapman, Vandalia, Ohio, 1991-1992. Accession Number: MCHC65-50, MCHC65-129, MCHC80-88, M89-92, M91-057, M91-240, M92-161


Processing Information

Processed by Sara Leuchter, Steven Ourada, Steven Bernardo, and Rick Kehrberg, 1986.


Contents List
Mss 677
Series: Biographical Material
Box   1
Folder   1
Awards, 1946-1976
Box   3
Folder   1
Biographical documents
Box   3
Folder   6
Biography by Cynthia Chapman, 1991
Box   1
Folder   2
Christmas card lists and addresses, 1930-1971
Box   1
Folder   3
Clippings
Box   1
Folder   4
Elm Street property (Westport, Connecticut), 1953-1979
Box   2
Folder   1
Guest lists and dinner menus, 1931-1934
Box   2
Folder   10
Guide to contents of Schultz's home, 1952, 1967, 1976
Box   2
Folder   2
Horoscopes, undated
Box   3
Folder   2-3
Identity materials
Interviews
Box   2
Folder   3
Notes regarding interviews by Sigrid Schultz, undated
Box   2
Folder   4
Notes regarding interviews with Sigrid Schultz, undated
Box   2
Folder   5-6
Transcripts of interview with Schultz for the William Wiener Oral History Library regarding pre-war Jewish conditions, 1971
Box   2
Folder   7-8
Revisions of transcript, 1971-1973
Box   2
Folder   9
Transcript of interview with Schultz for the Chicago Tribune Archives, 1977
Audio 1009A
Recorded interview for Viewpoint on foreign affairs and changes in American life, 1962
Mss 677
Box   2
Folder   11
Miscellany
Box   2
Folder   12
Passports
Box   3
Folder   4
Recipes
Box   3
Folder   5
School papers
Photographs
PH 3750
Schultz, family, friends, associates, pets, and home
PH 3752
German delegation to Rome: album, 1936 October
PH 3753
Nuremberg Rally: postcards and photographs in album, circa 1935 September
PH 3754
U.S. Army and Air Force public relations of educational programs in Germany, 1947-1949
Series: Chicago Tribune Material
Mss 677
Correspondence
Box   4
Folder   1-7
General, 1919-1978
Box   4
Folder   8
McCormick, Col. Robert, 1922-1955
Box   4A
Folder   1
Statements for publication, 1920-1923, undated
Box   4A
Folder   2
History of the War, fragments, undated
Mailed feature stories and fillers
Box   4A
Folder   3
1920-1922
Box   5
Folder   1-8
1923-1932
Box   6
Folder   1-2
1934-1941, undated
Box   6
Folder   3
Miscellany
Box   6
Folder   4
Notes and fragments, undated
Micro 777
Reel   1
Published articles, 1934-1939
Note: Microfilmed scrapbook pages, filmed without a counter.
Mss 677
Box   6
Folder   5-6
Telegraphed war reports, 1945
Box   6
Folder   7
Social news stories, “Americans in Berlin,” 1925-1928, undated
Box   6
Folder   8
Telegrams, 1921-1949
Series: General Correspondence
Business correspondence
Box   7
Folder   1
Book publishers, 1935-1979
Box   7
Folder   2
Government, 1926-1974
Leigh, W. Colston Inc.
Box   7
Folder   3
Contracts and related materials, 1942
Box   7
Folder   4
Correspondence, 1942-1943
Box   7
Folder   4A
McCall's, 1945, undated
Box   7
Folder   5
McIntosh and Otis Inc., 1934-1956
Box   7
Folder   6
Magazines, 1925-1979
Box   7
Folder   7
Mutual Broadcasting System, 1939-1953
Box   7
Folder   8
New York Times, 1931-1972
Pearson, Charles
Box   8
Folder   1
Contracts, 1943-1951
Box   8
Folder   2-3
Correspondence, 1943-1951, undated
Box   8
Folder   4
Reynal and Hitchcock Inc., 1943-1948
Personal correspondence
Box   8
Folder   5
Abel, August and family, 1939-1969
Box   8
Folder   6
Beaupre, Ellen Marietta, 1961-1980
Box   8
Folder   7
Bonney, Therese, 1959-1979
Box   8
Folder   8
Chadirji, Reouf, 1917-1952, undated
Box   9
Folder   1
Chenevee, Madeline, 1945-1972
Box   9
Folder   2
Crellin, Curt, 1942-1978
Box   9
Folder   3
Dennewitz, Carl, 1926-1933
Box   9
Folder   4-5
Deuel, Wallace, Mary, and family, 1948-1980, undated
Box   9
Folder   6
Djavidan, Princess Zubeida, 1947-1950
Box   9
Folder   7
Drechsler, Grus, 1921-1967
Box   9
Folder   8
Fairbank, Janet and family, 1936-1969
Box   9
Folder   9
Fraser, Geoffrey, 1929-1958
Box   9
Folder   10
Gibbons, Floyd, 1922-1979
Box   9
Folder   11
Goering, Hermann, 1931
Box   9
Folder   12
Hesslein, Pablo, 1944-1950
Box   9
Folder   12A
Politische Briefe
Box   9
Folder   13
Hoffmann family, 1938-1970
Box   9
Folder   14
Ilcus, Peter, 1937-1978, undated
Box   9
Folder   15
Kaltenborn, Hans V., 1946-1950
Box   9
Folder   16
Kiesler, Steffi, 1946-1962
Box   9
Folder   17
Klein, Herb, 1941-1976
Box   9
Folder   18
Kline, Sid, 1938-1946
Box   10
Folder   1
Kohlhamer, Lillian, 1922-1928
Box   10
Folder   2
Laidlaw, William, 1949-1979
Box   10
Folder   3
Lochner, Louis, 1935-1976
Box   10
Folder   3A
McCormick, Col. Robert, undated
Box   10
Folder   4
Mayer, Oscar and family, 1937-1962
Box   10
Folder   5
Meyer, Dr. J.C., 1948-1964
Box   10
Folder   6
Oldfield, Col. Barney, 1951-1979
Box   10
Folder   7
Paschasius, Walter, 1946-1964
Box   10
Folder   8
Petrushka, Leo, 1940-1961, undated
Box   10
Folder   9
Prather, JoAnne, 1968-1978, undated
Box   10
Folder   10
Preuss, Ernst, 1941-1963
Box   10
Folder   11
Sanner, Wolfgang, 1953-1965
Box   10
Folder   12
Schroeder, W. Emil, 1930-1964
Box   10
Folder   13
Shirer, William, 1942-1971
Box   10
Folder   14
State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1959-1979
Box   10
Folder   15
Steele, John, 1929-1959
Box   10
Folder   16
Thompson, Dorothy, 1944
Box   10
Folder   16A
Thurermer, Angus, undated
Box   10
Folder   16B
Voight, Hans-Joachimundated
Box   10
Folder   17
Von Schimpff, Alex, 1928-1973
Box   10
Folder   18
Wells, Bella Fromm, 1941-1971
Box   10
Folder   19
Ybarra, Thomas, 1925-1959
Box   10
Folder   20
Ziegelmayer, Dr. W., 1945
Box   10
Folder   21
Ziemer, Gregor, 1959-1976
General correspondence
Box   11
Folder   1-9
1920-1944
Box   12
Folder   1-7
1945-1953
Box   13
Folder   1-7
1954-1965
Box   14
Folder   1-8
1966-1976
Box   15
Folder   1-3
1977-1980, undated
Series: Financial Records
Correspondence
Box   16
Folder   1
American Express, 1941-1953
Box   16
Folder   2
Chase National Bank, 1937-1945
Box   16
Folder   3
Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust, 1938-1974
Box   16
Folder   4
Express Exchange, 1941
Box   16
Folder   5-6
First National Bank of Chicago, 1933-1975
Box   16
Folder   7
First National City Bank of New York, 1938-1948
Box   16
Folder   8
General, 1938-1972
Box   16
Folder   9
Internal Revenue Service, 1943-1976
Box   16
Folder   10
Westport (Connecticut) Bank and Trust, 1940-1976
Box   16
Folder   11-12
Daily and monthly spending logs, 1942-1964, undated
Income tax returns
Box   16
Folder   13-14
1941-1959
Box   17
Folder   1-2
1960-1970
Box   17
Folder   3
Insurance, 1964-1980
Box   18
Folder   1
Miscellany
Box   18
Folder   2-3
Stocks, 1933-1977
Series: General Files
Box   19
Folder   1
Calling cards, undated
Box   19
Folder   2
Invitations, undated
Box   20
Folder   1
Invitations, undated (continued)
Box   20
Folder   2-3
Lecture programs, 1941-1963, undated
Box   20
Folder   4
Menus
Note: Images of some menus are available online: Image ID: 101462, 101465, 101583, and 101704.
Box   20
Folder   5
Ocean travel (passenger lists, menus, etc.)
Note: Images of some menus are available online: Image ID: 101538 and 101539.
Series: Overseas Press Club Material
Box   20
Folder   6
Awards Committee, 1964-1970
Cookbook
Box   21
Folder   1-2
Anecdotes and recipes
Box   21
Folder   3
Correspondence, 1957-1967
Box   21
Folder   4
Manuscript
Box   22
Folder   1-2
Typesetter's manuscript
Box   22
Folder   3
Miscellany
Box   22
Folder   4
Scrapbook pages
Box   23
Folder   1
Reviews, 1961
Box   23
Folder   2-6
Correspondence, 1942-1980
Box   23
Folder   7
Dinner programs, 1942-1968
Note: Images of some menus are available online: Image ID: 106931.
Box   23
Folder   8
I Can Tell It Now, 1964
Box   23
Folder   9
Miscellany
Box   24
Folder   1
Newsbreak, 1973-1974
Series: Personal Writings
Articles
Box   24
Folder   2-3
“Adolf Hitler and the Forces That Enabled Him to Become the All-Powerful Fuehrer” (portions of several versions), 1973
Box   25
Folder   1-2
“Adolf Hitler and the Forces...” (continued)
Box   25
Folder   3
“Air Raids,” undated
Box   25
Folder   4
“Airplanes Get Them: I Saw the Nazis Cringe,” 1942
Box   25
Folder   5
“America's Preventive War and Russia's Craving for Peace Among Niemoeller's Best Lies,” undated
Box   25
Folder   6
“Anastasia,” undated
Box   25
Folder   7
“Angora: Pictorial Records of an SS Experiment” in Wisconsin Magazine of History, 1967
Box   25
Folder   8
“Are We Scared of Reality?,” undated
Box   25
Folder   9
“Are You a Nazi Dupe?,” undated
Box   25
Folder   10
“The Battle of the Ruhr,” undated
Box   25
Folder   11
“Berlin After World War I,” undated
Box   25
Folder   12
“The Berlin Mystery” (two versions), 1944
Box   25
Folder   13
“Biological Warfare,” Argosy, 1944
Box   25
Folder   14
“Blue Plot,” undated
Box   25
Folder   15
“Blueprint for Invasion Jitters,” 1944
Box   25
Folder   16
“C.B.S.” (incomplete), undated
Box   25
Folder   17
“Can American Horse Sense Create a Lasting Peace?”
Box   25
Folder   18
“Caro and Oehme: Schleicher's Ascension”
Box   25
Folder   19
“Challenge to Two Generations: I Saw the World Go Mad,” 1942
Box   25
Folder   20
“Check Your Facts,” undated
Box   25
Folder   21
Chicago Tribune fillers, undated
Box   25
Folder   22
“Conditions in Czechoslovakia Today,” 1939
Box   25
Folder   23
“The Dead Spoke Loudly,” (two versions), 1949
Box   25
Folder   23A
“Democracy Survived” by John Dickson, 1936
Box   25
Folder   24
“Do We Face Another Korea in Germany?,” (four versions), 1950
Box   25
Folder   25
“Eva Braun,” 1942
Box   25
Folder   26
“The Fine Art of the Doublecross” (four versions), 1966
Box   25
Folder   27
“For the Free Sons of Israel,” (incomplete), undated
Box   25
Folder   28
“German School Books,” circa 1950s
Box   25
Folder   29
“Germany's Part-Time Brides,” McCall's, 1946
Box   25
Folder   30
“Germany's Underground Wants War” and “Germany, Russia and the U.S.A.,” Collier's, 1947
Box   25
Folder   31
“Go-Getter Germany,” (by John Dickson), Chicago Tribune, 1939
Box   26
Folder   1
“Goering,” 1942
Box   26
Folder   2
“Goering Holds Airplanes Back for His Own Purposes,” 1943
Box   26
Folder   3
“Half Way Surrender” (with Fritz Hesse), 1952
Box   26
Folder   4
“Happy Plotters” (incomplete), 1958
Box   26
Folder   5
“Hindenburg” (incomplete), undated
Box   26
Folder   6
“How Dangerous is He, This Ex-Nazi?,” undated
Box   26
Folder   7
“The Inside Story of Our Communistic Enemies,” 1955
Box   26
Folder   8
“The Inside Story of the Kremlin Crisis,” undated
Box   26
Folder   9
“Is Czechoslovakia's Twentieth Century Pattern of Living Doomed,” undated
Box   26
Folder   10
“Is It Safe to Re-Arm Western Germany?,” circa 1950
Box   26
Folder   11
“June Blood Purge” (by John Dickson), Chicago Tribune, 1935
Box   26
Folder   12
“Kapp Rehearses for Hitler,” undated
Box   26
Folder   13
“Living Death of Nazism: Killing of Children” (incomplete), undated
Box   26
Folder   14
“Masters of the Doublecross Win in FDP Convention in Bad Ems,” 1952
Box   26
Folder   15
“Mass Murder as Part of Totalitarian Warfare,” undated
Box   26
Folder   16
“Men Against Party Machines,” undated
Box   26
Folder   17
“Mistakes From Which We Must Learn if We Are to Defeat Communism,” undated
Box   26
Folder   18
“Moscow's Inside Story of the Battle of Berlin” or “The Kremlin Bosses Fight,” undated
Box   27
Folder   1
“Moscow's Secret Allies in the Middle East,” 1955
Box   27
Folder   2
“Must We Spend Billions to Salvage Germany?” (incomplete), undated
Box   27
Folder   3
“Nazi Germ Carriers,” 1942
Box   27
Folder   4
“Nazis Abroad,” undated
Box   27
Folder   5
“Nazis Train Crack Salesmen and Propagandists for Foreign Consumption,” 1935
Box   27
Folder   6
“Neo-Nazis are Pleased,” January 26, 1954
Box   27
Folder   7
“New Light on the History of the Discovery of America,” undated
Box   27
Folder   8
“The New Quest for Loyal Leaders” (incomplete), undated
Box   27
Folder   9
“New York Newspaperwomen” (incomplete), undated
Box   27
Folder   10
“1936,” undated
Box   27
Folder   11
“Notes on Hess,” undated
Box   27
Folder   12
“Of Spies, Intrigue, Fear, and the Guillotine,” undated
Box   27
Folder   13
“Only Justice Can Save Europe,” 1949 October
Box   27
Folder   14
“Open Season for Suckers,” 1944
Box   27
Folder   15
“Ostriches in the Sands of Egypt” (incomplete), undated
Box   27
Folder   16
“Peace,” undated
Box   27
Folder   17
“Peace is in Danger Now,” undated
Box   27
Folder   18
“Peace Terms,” undated
Box   27
Folder   19
“The Poisoned Well?” or “The Poisonous Fountain of Life,” undated
Box   27
Folder   20
“Racial Cult,” undated
Box   27
Folder   21
“Regimentation of Private Life,” undated
Box   27
Folder   22
“Sex as a Nazi Weapon,” undated
Box   27
Folder   23
Short articles, titled, undated
Box   27
Folder   24
Short articles, incomplete, undated
Box   27
Folder   25
“Snakepit of Mutual Fears” (incomplete), undated
Box   27
Folder   26
“The Snakepit of Rival Agents,” 1955 May 5
Box   27
Folder   27
“Snoopers' Rat Race,” undated
Box   27
Folder   28
“Soviet Russia in Germany,” undated
Box   27
Folder   29
“That Calculated Risk,” undated
Box   27
Folder   30
“Their Desperate Quest,” undated
Box   27
Folder   31
“Their Last Gamble,” 1944
Box   27
Folder   32
“They Malign Pope Pius XII,” 1964
Box   27
Folder   33
“They'll Try it Again,” undated
Box   27
Folder   34
“Traps for Americans on the Road to a Lasting Peace,” undated
Box   27
Folder   35
“Turning Point of History,” 1949
Box   27
Folder   36
“Two Irons in the Fire,” 1952
Untitled
Box   27
Folder   37
Alber, Hans, undated
Box   27
Folder   38
American occupation of Aachen, undated
Box   27
Folder   39
Anecdotes, undated
Box   27
Folder   40
Anti-Nazi revolution attempt of 1938, undated
Box   27
Folder   41
[Brooklyn: The Week in Review], undated
Box   28
Folder   1
Concentration camps (multiple versions), undated
Box   28
Folder   2
Duncan, Isadora, undated
Box   28
Folder   3
Gehlen, Reinhard, Multiple incomplete memoirs, 1971
Box   28
Folder   4
German mothers, pre-World War II, undated
Box   28
Folder   5
Germany, post-World War II (multiple versions), circa 1940s
Box   28
Folder   6
Germany, post-World War II (multiple versions), circa 1950s
Box   28
Folder   7
Germany's pre-World War II ambitions, undated
Box   28
Folder   8
Germany's pre-World War II Nazi tactics (multiple versions), circa 1930s
Box   28
Folder   9
Gryshkat, Ernst, undated
Box   28
Folder   10
Hitler, Adolf (numerous versions), undated
Box   29
Folder   1
John, Dr. Otto (incomplete), undated
Box   29
Folder   2
Kaiser Wilhelm, undated
Box   29
Folder   3
Kiep family, undated
Box   29
Folder   4
Lebensborn (incomplete), undated
Box   29
Folder   5
Miscellaneous short articles, undated
Box   29
Folder   6
Pan-Germany (two incomplete versions), undated
Box   29
Folder   7
Princess Frederike of Hanover, circa 1930s
Box   29
Folder   8
Re-educating Germany after the war, undated
Box   29
Folder   9
Dr. Richard Sallet (incomplete), undated
Box   29
Folder   10
United States (three versions), circa 1960s
Box   29
Folder   11
World War II (multiple versions versions), circa 1940s and undated
Box   29
Folder   12
“Was Gehlen the Twentieth Century Superspy?,” 1971
Box   29
Folder   13
“We Got the Inside News” (incomplete), undated
Box   29
Folder   14
“We Want to Salvage Germany, But Need We Go Broke Doing It?,” undated
Box   29
Folder   15
“Which One is Dangerous?,” 1948
Box   29
Folder   16
“Who Killed General von Hammerstein?,” 1943
Box   29
Folder   17
“Who Will Eradicate Nazism?” (incomplete), undated
Box   29
Folder   18
“Why Did Adolf Hitler Declare War on the U.S.?,” 1970
Box   29
Folder   19
“Why Did the Germans Fight On After Their Generals Knew the War was Lost?,” undated
Box   29
Folder   20
“Why Irate Bundestag Fights for Control of the German Army,”, 1955
Box   29
Folder   21
“Winter of 1933-1934,” undated
Box   29
Folder   22
“Women Nazis are the Worst,” undated
Box   29
Folder   23
“Women Should Volunteer for the Battle of Peace,” undated
Box   29
Folder   24
“Women's Town” (incomplete), undated
Box   29
Folder   25
Book reviews, 1943-1964
Books
Germany Will Try It Again (1944)
Box   29
Folder   26
Correspondence, 1944
Box   30
Folder   1-2
Reviews, 1944
“New Watch on the Rhine”
Box   30
Folder   3
Outlines, 1953-1955
Box   30
Folder   4-15
Chapter drafts, Chapter I - XII, undated
Box   31
Folder   1
Suggestions for books, 1947-1953, undated
“Triple Threat,” 1948-1949
Box   31
Folder   2-3
Outlines
Box   31
Folder   4-10
Chapter drafts, I-VII
Box   31
Folder   11-12
Manuscript draft, pp. 44-381
Box   31
Folder   13
Miscellaneous chapter fragments
Box   31
Folder   14
Underground movement in Germany, Book manuscript, undated
Box   32
Folder   1-2
Unidentified chapters, undated
Daily logs and diaries
Box   32
Folder   3
Transcript, 1919-1940
Box   32
Folder   4-5
1910-1936
Box   33
Folder   1
1937-1958
Box   50
Folder   1-19
1952, 1961-1979
Box   33
Folder   2
Games, “Military Checkers,” undated
Box   33
Folder   3
Ideas for radio and television, undated
Memoirs
Box   33
Folder   4
Draft chapters, 1971
Box   34
Folder   1-2
Chapter pieces and fragments
Box   34
Folder   3-4
Short sketches
Box   35
Folder   1
Short sketches (continued)
Box   35
Folder   2
Unidentified loose pages, undated
Box   35
Folder   3
Motion picture scenarios, 1942, undated
Notes and notebooks
Box   35
Folder   4
1918-1949
Box   36
Folder   1-7
1920-1949
Box   37
Folder   1-7
1949-1959, undated
Box   38
Folder   1-3
Radio broadcasts, 1938-1954
Box   38
Folder   4-6
Speeches and lectures, 1941-1959, undated
Box   38
Folder   7
Scrapbook pages regarding speeches and public appearances, 1944-1949
Series: Collected Papers
Subject Files
Box   39
Folder   1
American Women's Club of Berlin
Box   39
Folder   2
Anti-semitism
Box   39
Folder   3-4
Articles and letters (in German), collected by Schultz, 1920-1955
Box   39
Folder   5
Associated magazine contributors
Box   39
Folder   6
“Aussage Huppenkothen”
Box   39
Folder   6A
Beller, Heinz, undated
Box   39
Folder   7
Bierganz, Maria, “Spa Diary”
Box   39
Folder   8
“Bund der Verfolgten des Naziregimes,” 1951
Box   39A
Folder   1
CARE Inc.
Box   39A
Folder   1A
Church Peace Union, 1928
Box   39A
Folder   2
Conference on Germany After the War
Box   39A
Folder   3
“Dritte Kongress der Nationalen Krafte Europas”
Box   39A
Folder   4
“The Enemy Roosevelt”
Box   40
Folder   1
Figdor, Karl
Box   40
Folder   2
German diplomats abroad
Box   40
Folder   3
“Gotha, 1942”
Box   40
Folder   4
Hundhammer, Dr. Alois
Box   40
Folder   5
Iros, Ernst
Box   40
Folder   6
Kaul, Dr. Friedrich
Box   40
Folder   7
Kiep, Hannah
Box   40
Folder   8
Klein, Julius
Box   40
Folder   9
Kunze, Dr. Walter
Box   40
Folder   10
Lutsches, Peter
Box   40
Folder   11
O.S.S.
Box   40
Folder   12
Organization of Foreign Correspondents in Berlin
Box   40
Folder   13
Reger, Max
Box   40
Folder   14
Schmitt, Dr. Johannes
Box   40
Folder   15
Weiger, Dr.
Writings by others
Box   41
Folder   1
Anderson, Peter, “Heinrich Himmler,” undated
Box   41
Folder   2
Cavael, Rolf, “Parten Kirchen,” undated
Box   41
Folder   3
Clayton, John, “Hindenburg and the Monarchy,” undated
Box   41
Folder   4
Cummings, H.J., “The Hero Cult in American Biography,” undated
Box   41
Folder   5
Djavidan, Princess, Assorted stories, undated
Box   41
Folder   6
Findahl, Theo, “Cities of Caesar,” undated
Box   41
Folder   7
Huessy, Rosenstock, “Mad Economics or Polyglot Peace,” undated
Joffo, D.P., “War or Peace”
Box   41
Folder   8
Part I
Box   42
Folder   1
Part II
Box   42
Folder   2
Larsen, A.D., “Kokampf,” 1919-1920
Box   42
Folder   3
Rechberg, Arnold, 1919-1945
Box   42
Folder   4
Spannhake, E.W., “The Economic Domination of the National Socialists in Germany,” undated
Box   42
Folder   5
Teichner, Miriam, “Incident on an Express Train,” undated
Box   42
Folder   6
Von Niedermayer, Oskar, “The Geopolitical Foundations of Eurasiatic-African Transition Space,” 1923
Box   42
Folder   7
Von Thadden, Adolf, “Duty Toward the Right,” 1953
Box   42
Folder   8
Unknown author on invasion of Norway, 1940
Series: Family Papers
Schultz Family
Intra-family correspondence
Box   43
Folder   1-6
1884-1937
Box   44
Folder   1-7
1938-1954
Hedwig Schultz
Correspondence
Box   45
Folder   1
Deuel family, 1939-1957, undated
Box   45
Folder   2-5
General, 1938-1955
Box   45
Folder   6
Regarding the death of Hedwig Schultz, 1960
Daily logs and diaries
Box   45
Folder   7
1902, 1914, 1918, 1921, 1922, 1925
Box   46
Folder   1-4
1926-1937, 1950
Box   50
Folder   20-22
1929, 1930, 1933
Box   51
1940-1959
Box   46
Folder   5
Miscellany
Box   46
Folder   6
Notebooks, 1941-1953
Hermann Schultz
Box   46
Folder   7
Address books, 1887-1904, undated
Box   46
Folder   8
Biographical material and clippings, undated
Daily logs and diaries
Box   46
Folder   9-10
1888-1917
Box   47
Folder   1
1918-1923
Box   47
Folder   2
Miscellany
PH 3751
Photographs
Mss 677
Box   47
Folder   3-4
Sketchbooks, undated
Box   48
Folder   1-3
Sketchbooks, undated (continued)
Jaskewitz Family
Box   49
Folder   1
Biographical material, undated
Box   49
Folder   2
Clippings, 1865-1878, undated
Box   49
Folder   3
Correspondence, 1835-1908, undated
Box   49
Folder   4
Miscellany
Box   49
Folder   5
Theatrical programs, 1836-1882
Series: Photographs: Additions
PH 3813
Buchenwald and Ohrdruf, 1945
Physical Description: 18 photographs (1 folder) 
Note: Photographs taken soon after the liberation of German World War II concentration camps at Buchenwald and Ohrdruf, 1945, of living prisoners, dead prisoners in large piles, human ashes, remains, and preserved skin with tattoos.
PH 3814
Germany photographs, circa 1914-circa 1950
Physical Description: Approximately 34 photographs (1 folder) 
Note: Copy photographs of German WWI aviator's photo album, snapshots of Nazi parade, Soviet soldiers at a checkpoint, East German Socialist youth organization (FDJ) marching, East German Volkspolizei marching and training to make arrests.
PH 3815
German S.S. military decorations: copies, circa 1938
Physical Description: 1 photocopy and 13 color plates 
Note: Color reproductions of military decorations awarded to members of the German S.S. with descriptions, circa 1938, including military decorations, their histories, and lists of S.S. officers to receive them.
M91-057
Box   1-5
Photographs, circa 1893-1975
Physical Description: 1909 photographs and 92 negatives (4 archives boxes and 1 flat box) 
Note: Photographs of family, friends, business associates, and others, circa 1893-1975, including Nazi propaganda from the 1930s and many photographs of Schultz's father's studio, paintings, and travels. (Ms. Schultz loaned this material to Cynthia Chapman, a researcher who was writing a biography of Schultz as a Ph.D. thesis, with the proviso that it be turned over to the State Historical Society of Wisconsin when she was finished with it.)