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Strauch, Dora; Brockmann, Walter / Satan came to Eden
(1936)

Chapter XXV: All is over,   pp. 258-269 ff.


Page 258

 
Chapter XXV: ALL IS OVER 
THE TRAGIC AND OBSCURE PASSING OF THE BAR- 
:ss all that was weird in the island returned. 
e awareness of supernatural forces inimical to 
which had been so strong in me before she 
ne had been banished almost entirely by the 
                  element of concrete enmity and strife which she 
brought with her. The days that followed our visit to the Hacienda, 
where we found such indubitable proof that she and Philippson had 
been done away with, were the most haunted and uncanny I had 
known. 
  Added to this was the quite practical fear that Frederick and I 
might be implicated, should ever an investigation into these disap- 
pearances be made. We could only tell the story as we knew it, 
but who would believe us? And then there was another danger- 
Lorenz himself, the murderer. We said to each other that a man 
who could go to such lengths to regain his freedom would not 
be scrupulous about securing it at the expense of anybody who 
he felt might be a danger to him; therefore the slightest slip on 
our part, that might lead him to suspect that we had made all too 
accurate deductions, would inevitably expose us to the same fate 
as had overtaken the two others. 
  Our certainty about the murders sometimes seemed strange to 
me. Not the least doubt ever entered our minds but that the Bar- 
oness and Philippson had been removed by violence. We never 
found their bodies, and perhaps no one ever will. We did not 
believe that they had been thrown into the sea, for the sea is often 
not a very safe hiding-place. It is extremely probable that they were 
burned, for a furnace of acacia wood bums with such intensity 
that even bones consigned to it are consumed to fine ash. We our- 
selves had proved this with the cattle bones, which we often dis- 
posed of in this way. During such a drought even the hard acacia 
wood would bum like tinder. 
  There was another possibility, and this was the one which 
made the island beyond Friedo unholy ground to me from this 
time on. The ghost of Watkins had never disturbed us before. 
Now, passing the many caves and crevices one had to pass even on 
                              258 


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