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Rochester Academy "Echo"
(1910)

Literary,   pp. 17-30


Page 21

Literary Open Meetings
7N the evening of November 3, 1909, the Olympian Literary Society held its
first open session, in the assembly room of the Academy building.  The
program rendered was very interesting, and showed the interest the students
take in the work, and the progress they are making toward the aim ex
pressed by the organization, that is efficiency in public speal ing and clear cut
expression in literary work. Three musical numbers proved very enjoyable, especially
as one was called for unexpectedly. A debate: "Resolved, That the Immigration Laws
Should be Amended," was well worked up; a conversational, "How Birds Find Their
Way Home;" a recitation, "Two Glasses;~ an oration, "Martin Luther;" and two or
three impromptu speeches, afforded good illustration of the work the students are doing on
these programs, and were given that night in a manner that showed the literary work is
producing resulits.  Most of those in the audience were students, but several from the
village attended.
The Pythian Society held an open session on Wednesday evening, December 8,
TE R                1909, in the assembly room. In addition to three entertaining musical numbers, the fol-
RICK               lowing parts were given: recitation, "Words and Their Uses;" a conversational, "Edi-
IEIER               son's New Invention;" debate, "Resolved, That U. S. Senators should be elected by
TELL                popular vote;" an essay, "Submarine Torpedo Boats ;" a recitation, "That-Little Dog;"
JlANA
an oration, "Judge Lindsey and His Work."    Three members were called upon for
"SON
"AND                impromptu speeches, and at least made a showing on the subjects.  Those taking part in
AND
the program carried off their parts in a manner creditable to themselves and their society,
while the pains taken in decorating the room for the occasion evinced the enthusiasm of
the society in its work.
HAROLD NEWCOMB'S EXTEMPORY ON SKEEING.
"It's lots of fun to go skeeing. When you are learning, the first time you go down,
you start at the top of the hill and you go so fast that it feels as if the wind was going
through your stomach. Then you think, 'Oh, gee, I'm going to fall,' and then you do!"


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