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Wisconsin Farmers' Institutes / Wisconsin Farmers' Institutes : a hand-book of agriculture. A report of the twelfth annual closing Farmers' Institute held at Janesville, March 8, 9, and 10, 1898
Bulletin No. 12 (1898)

Hill, Chas. L.
Breeding and developing a dairy herd,   pp. 142-148 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page 143


pmw -
BREEDING AND DEVEWPING A HERD.
three months before she is to become
a mother increase her grain ration to
about all the bran or other similar
food she will eat, as any fat she may
put on at this late period will all dis-
appear after she gets to milking. We
do this to induce her to make a large
udder this first time she is fresh, as
her business is to be the production of
milk, and the sooner her funotions all
tend in that direction, the better.
who are constantly saying of the suc-
cessful dairyman, "He pays out more
for feed than he gets for the milk,"
unless you have carefully estimated
just how much they do feed, and have
stopped to figure what the 300 pounds
of butter, each cow should produce, is
worth.
The Babcock Text and a Pair of
Scale*.
If there is any one thing that will
GUERNSEY BULL-BEN BISHOP 1606. FULL BROTHER Ur ' AJJss
TRICKSEY. GEO. C. HILL & SON, ROSENDALE, WIS.
The very best time to have a heifer
drop her first calf Is In the fush of
grass, in May or June, and let her milk
continuously for thirteen or fourteen
months, dropping her second calf in
October. This will help establish your
cow as a persistent milker. Always
treat your cows with kindness. Feed,
water, and milk regularly. Remember
it is nearly always true that the more
grain you can get your cow to eat and
assimilate, the larger will be your
profit.
Don't number yourself among those
h e l p ~ ~ ~ _ _ u s   t o   vs u c e e   5 n   l a y m e ,  z u u o
help us to succeed as dairymen, MOMs
than any other, It is a constant use of
scales and the Babcock test on our
farms. It will pay any farmer to keep
an accurate record of the milk pro-
duced by each cow. It is not as much
work as you think. I have here a
sample of the milk record sheet that
we use. This is more elaboratethan irls
necessary to use. A sheet of foolscap
paper ruled, will answer every pur-
pose. Once a week weighings will
answer just as well to show approxi-
mately a cow's yearly record, but the
143
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