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Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association / Proceedings of the twelfth annual meeting of the Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Diarymen's Association held at Monroe, Wisconsin, Thursday and Friday, February 1 and 2, 1912
(1912)

Emery, J. Q.
Calf paths,   pp. 90-102 PDF (2.8 MB)


Page 96


96
Twelfth Annual Convention.
readily cleaned rooms, pure water, good drainage,.
clean utensils and surroundings.
But the cheese factory owners and operaters, who
like very many in the territory occupied by the mem-
bership of this association, have constructed perma-
nent factories with sanitary provisions that meet the
requirements of the present; with floors and walls
so constructed as to be readily cleaned; with a drain-
age system that effectively fulfills its purpose; with
ample supply of pure water; who so screen the doors,
windows and intakes as to shut out the flies from
the factory; who provide means for obtaining the
fat from the whey and manufacturing it into a pro-
duct nearly or quite equal to creamery butter; who
demand clean milk from the patrons; who enforce
scrupulous cleanliness as to all utensils and sur-
roundings; who encourage competent and skillful
cheese makers by paying them liberal wages; have
obliterated many zigzag paths and have struck out
and followed more direct and rational ways to high
success.
The cheesemaker is pursuing a "wabbling rail" who
fails to master the intricacies of Swiss cheese making
before he assumes responsibility for its manufacture;
who fails to appreciate the necessity of constant and
unpromoting use of his best skill in every step, every
process of cheese production; who is tolerant of bad
s-wvage, unclean milk, filth of any kind in factory or
upon uter.sils, flies, unclean whey barrels, or any-
thing else that tends to deteriorate the quality of his
cheese.
It is evidence that dairymen are not out of the
"maze of calf-paths" in their thinking and practice
who do not recognize the necessity of laying the
foundation of profits in dairying by conserving the
fertility of the soil and by using modern scientific
methods of tillage, thereby producing the largest
possible crops of the most suitable character to meet
the needs of their dairy herds; who fail to provide


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