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Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association / Proceedings of the tenth annual meeting of the Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association held at Monroe, Wisconsin, Thurs. and Fri., January 27 and 28, 1910
(1910)

Readheimer, J. E.
Phosphorus as a fertilizer on the dairy farm,   pp. 75-83 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 81


SOUTHERN WIS. CLIESMIAXF.RS' & DAIRYMEN'S ASS'N. 81
increased the yield of corn as an average of the past six years
from 68 bushels to 88 bushels per acre, a gain of 20 bushels
per acre. In 1901') the increase due to clover, lime and
pliophorus over clover and lime was 44 bushels per acre.
The increase, due to manure, li me an(l phosphorus over
manture and lime was 311 bushels per acre.
On one of the soil experiment fields in southern Illinois
pliosplorus increasel the yield of wheat from 19 bushels
per acre to 27 bushels per acre as the average of 0 years
On the Antioch soil experiment liel(l in Lake County only
a few miles from the \Visconsin line, phosphoru-, added to
nitrogen gave a;n increase over nitrogen alone valued at
$4.51 per acre as an average of 6 years work. In the use
of raw rock phosphate in connection with decaying organic
matter we also have a large amount of information. As an
average of 32 distinct and entirely seperate tests conducted
on eig ht differeit fields in six different counties, the average
yield of corn in 19[). was increased 9) bushels per acre
where raw rock phosphate had been used during the previous
four or five years.
Many practical farmers of Illinois have used raw rock
phosphate under the direction from the Illinois Experiment
Station with excellent results. Among the many I can only
mention the most prominent, Mr. Frank I. Mann of Gilman,
a director of the State Farmers' Institute and a member of
the Advisorv Committee of the State Farmers' Institute on
soil investigations by the Experiment Station. Mr. Mann
has a farm of 50)' acres of $200 land in the heart of the corn
belt on which he has been using raw rock phosphate for
the past live or six years in a four year rotation of corn two
years, oats, and clover. The rock phosphate is always
applie(l to the clover sod, 1000 pounds per acre, and plowed
down for corn. In 1906 an 80 acre field of oats yielded 80
bushels on treated land and 60 bushels on land not treated.
The same year a 60 acre field of corn yielded 35 bushels on
treated land and 40 bushels on land not treated. In 1907 an
8() acre field of corn yielded 62 bushels on treated land and


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