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Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association / Proceedings of the ninth annual meeting of the Southern Wisconsin Cheesemakers' and Dairymen's Association held at Monroe, Wisconsin, Thursday and Friday, March 11 and 12, 1909
(1909)

Baer, U. S.
Dairy hints,   pp. 53-57 PDF (935.6 KB)


Page 55


SOUTHERN WIS. CHEESEMAKERS' & DAIRYMEN'S ASS'N. 55
condition with reference to cleanliness as well as its fat
content, influences the quality and quantity of the products
made from it. Cleaner methods in our dairies are of the
greatest importance to the success and reputation of Wis-
consin dairying.
It is to the financial interest of every patron of a cheese
factory that the milk delivered shall be the best and purest
that can be produced. The man who increases his monthly
check by skimming or watering his milk, is stealing that
amount from others to whom it belongs, but that man who
delivers contaminated milk to a factory does infinitely
worse, as his milk will injuriously affect the entire pro-
duction of the day and thus decrease the returns to every
patron and rob the consuming public of a clean and whole-
some product.
The losses in this state caused by taints or changes in
the milk due to the lack of proper knowledge or neglect
and carelessness are enormous as compared with the losses
caused by sknimming or watering. Butter and cheesemakers
should absolutelv refuse to accept milk tainted or unfit for
use; they should do this in justice to themselves and to
patrons who deliver good milk and in obedience to the laws
of the state.
The greater part of our cheesemakers are of a pro-
gressive nature and seem to realize the fact that their
business is one in which any circumstance tending to throw
any additional light upon their work is not to be dis-
regarded. However, we occasionally encounter that maker
who has (unfortunately for him) reached the top round
of the ladder. That is he gives you to understand that
what he does not know about the business is not of
sufficient importance to admit of discussion.
Recently I inspected a cheese factory which in its sur-
roundings gave the impression that the swine had been
making the pools of whey and slop-water underneath the
factory floors sort of headquarters for some time.  Filth
had accumulated everywhere. The maker immediately began


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