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Pullen, Lloyd T. / Pullen's pencilings and various other selections, embracing a variety of subjects; pathos, description, argument and narrative
(1904)

Chapter XIV,   pp. 175-191


Page 182

PULLEN'S PENCILINGS. 
but is catering for the Irish vote. His speech in Portland, which his enemies
admit was a fine effort and a fair exposition of the question under consideration.
But, say they, "It is quite possible, however, that the magnetic statesman
was thinking more of helping himself than of helping Gladstone and Parnell."
If a republican state convention is held in his own state to put in nomination
a candidate for governor and other state officers, Mr. Blaine gets all the
credit of manipulating the wires and ropes of the successful side, and all
the corresponding curses that naturally follow from the other side. I submit
another little extract from one of the leading Boston papers on this subject:
"Messrs. Blaine and Manley nominated a candidate for governor of Maine
last winter, and ordered his endorsement by the Republican State Convention.
Of course the order was obeyed." 
What a wonderful man this Mr. Blaine must be that even the winds and the
waves of all the disturbing political elements obey or are in some way subject
to him! Some claim that the Gladstone bill in the British Parliament would
have received more votes had it not been for his Portland speech. He seems
to be the scapegoat in all the most important questions on both continents.
He not only has to bear his own sins and the sins of the republican party,
but they try to figure in the whole world and the rest of mankind. If he
expresses an opinion in private on the fishery question, he is fishing for
fishermen votes. If he says a word against monopolies and in favor of labor,
he is bidding for votes. If he goes from home he is looking up his chances
for a nomination for the presidency. If he stays at home he is counting his
chances for the nomination. If he is indisposed in any way, he is trying
to excite sympathy and thereby strengthen his claim to the presidency. If
his health is unusually good, he is determined to live until he obtains the
presidency. If he happens to take cold and looks up to the sun in order to
get a good sneeze, he is invoking the gods to assist him in obtaining the
nomination for the presidency. If he don't succeed in sneezing to the satisfaction
of all his critics and has to "blow," he is sounding his horn and
marshalling his forces to capture the presidency. If all these 


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