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Early history of Ozaukee County, Wisconsin
(1965)

Ozaukee County Indians,   p. 13


History of Cedarburg - its growth through industry and the pioneers who settled there,   pp. 13-14A


Page 13

OZAUKEE COUNTY INDIANS
The original Indians that settled in Ozaukee County were the
Pottawattomies. Many transient tribes roamed the area at the same time
Sacs, Sauks, Ousakies, Chippewas and Ottawas. These tribes eventually &i
on and Ozaukee County became the home of the Menominees until they cede(
to the United States Government in 1831. As you can guess -- Ozaukee Coi
derives its name from the Sacs, Sauks and Ousakies.
The streams of Ozuakee County afford excellent facilities for water
power. The early settlers in this section were not slow to discover thei
natural advantages, and as some old writer has put it "neccessity is the
mother of invention,," so these men cast into the wilderness, out of the 3
of civilization, and destitif of a market or the means of manufacturing
breadstuffs, were entirely dependent on their own exertions to supply tho
deficiency. Log shanties were built which served them as a shelter, whe3
cracked the kernels of corn and grain by hand, until sawills to make tht
lumber and grist mills to grind theit flour, could be erected.
HISTORY OF CEDARBURG - ITS GROWTH THROUGH INDUSTRY AND THE
PIONEERS' WHO SETTLED THERE
Frederick Hilgen (called tbt Father of Cedarburg) and William Schrof
cut a road through the forest in 1l44, to what became the Village of Cedi
A
The following year, 1845, they erected the first grist mill of half log a
half frame construction, on the bank of Cedar Creek where they later buil
present Cedarburg Mill in 1855. It was built by Burchard Weber on what J
the corner of Columbia and Portland Avenues. However, due to the flow o1


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