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McLeod, Donald / History of Wiskonsan, from its first discovery to the present period, including a geological and topographical description of the territory with a correct catalogue of all its plants
(1846)

Chapter XIV,   pp. 235-254 PDF (3.3 MB)


Page 250


250           HISTORY OF WISKONSAN.
rapid growth and flattering prospects of Southport,
place it in the front rank of towns, which have sprung
up, as if by magic, within a few years, in this young
and fertile territory.
  The first permanent settlement of Southport was
commenced in 1836. At that tine the small settle-
ments at Milwaukie and Racine, and one or two estab-
lishments trading with the Indians, composed all the
white settlements north of Chicago. The trade of the
southern part of Wisconsin and northern part of Illi-
nois, will naturally centre at this point. The citizens
of Southport, like those of Racine, have, unaided by
the General Government, improved their harbor, so
that vessels and steamboats can enter it with rapidity
and safety.
  The growth and advancement of this village, have
been rapid and steady, and the future is pregnant with
still greater prosperity. Every day brings large ad-
ditions to the amount of its capital and merchandise,
and every hour large accessions to the population
which trades with it. The capabilities of the country
around it, for sustaining and enriching a dense popula-
tion, are perhaps unequalled. Almost every foot of
the soil is eminently available for some of the purposes
of agriculture; and the whole presents a variety and
fertility that warrants a lucrative return in every one
of its branches. The tide of emigration is rolling
steadily and incessantly upon every section of the
territory. Nature points, by unerring indications, to
great public works, that will ere long, connect the wa-
ters of the great lakes with those of the Mississippi,
and pour into the lap of Wiskonsan, exclusive of her
is
I
I
I'i
d
commenced in 1836. At Mat time the small settle-
ments at Milwaukie and Racine, and one or two estab-
lishments tradinc, with the Indians, composed all the
white settlements north of Chicago. The trade of the
southern part of Wisconsin and northern part of Illi-
nois, will naturally centre at this point. The citizens
of Southport, like thoseof Racine, have, unaided by
the General Government, improved their harbor, so
that vessels and steamboats can enter it with rapidity
and safety.
  The growth and advancement of this village, have
been rapid and steady, and the future is pregnant with
still greater prosperity. Every day brings large ad-
ditions to the amount of its capital and merchandise,
and every hour large accessions to the population
which trades with it. The capabilities of the country
around it, for sustaining and enriching a dense popula-
tion, are perhaps unequalled. Almost every foot of
the soil is eminently available for some of the purposes
of apriculture; and the whole presents a variet and
    r-,                                    y
fertility that warrants a lucrative return in every one
of its branches. The tide of emigration is rolling
steadily and incessantly upon every section of the
territory. Nature points, by unerring indications, to
great public works, that will ere long, connect the wa-
ters of the great lakes with those of the Mississippi,
and pour into the lap of Wiskonsan, exclusive of her
I
I
I'i
d


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