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University of Wisconsin. College of Agriculture. Dept. of Agricultural Economics / Cooperation principles and practices: the application of cooperation to the assembling, processing and marketing of farm products, to the purchase of farm supplies and consumers' goods and to credit and insurance
([1937])

V. Cooperation in Great Britain,   pp. 40-47 PDF (2.3 MB)


Page 44


                    TADLZ vi-Progress of M/e C.WS. 1865-19331
                  Number of
                  members
                          by                                            
    NNumber
                  sh reboldb=       Total          Saes          Net    
      Of
Year               societies       capital      (wholesale)     surplus 
    workers
                                   (pounds)      (pounds)       (puds
1865                 24,005           7,182        120,754         1,5s8
187S                198,608         263,282       1,964,829        20,684
8855               507,772         841,175       4,793,151        77,630
      1,731
l895                 930,985       2,093,578     10,141,917       192,766
      6,390
1905               1,635,527      4,398,933      20,785,469       304,568
     14,156
1914               2,336,460      9,902,447      34,910,813       840,069
     23,211
191S               2,5315972      11,075,199     43,101 747      1,086,962
    25,066
1920               3,341,411     27,844,322     105,439,628        64,210
     36,391
1925               3,778,659     45,369,050      76,585,764      1,053,504
    34,908
1926               3,876,695     45,552,080      75,292,233      1,094,288
    35,367
1927               4,020,332     47,890,633      86,894,379      1,530,969
    37,142
1928*'             4,454,793     53,431,067      87,294,025      1,379,672
    39,392
1929               4,565,372      59,229,542     89,288,125      1,396,974
    40,485
1930               4,884,090     66,517,146      85,313,018      I,344,218
    41,205
1931               S,138,124      72,366,833     81,498,234      1,692,157
    41,435
1932^'             5,352,310     76,467,379      82,769,119      1,729,223
    41,958
1933               5,488,364     84,019,417      82,120,864      1,473,838
    44,191
     Lows     53 weeks   -**SS5 weeks
     In 1933, out of the 1,473,838 pounds surplus, 1,411,922 pounds were
distributed a dividend on the
nub hemforetaii societies from the C.WS, members receiving 4d. In the pound
and non-members 2d.
                e  additional dividend at half those rates on purchses of
C.WS. productions during
    The total sales othe C.W.S. from the commencement of its operations to
the end of 1953 amounted
to 1,980,777,296 pous
    The total suplus accruing In these years was 22,363 902 pounds
    ' Daling, George "Told in Brief-The History and Iurpose of the Cooperative
Wholesale Society,
Ltd." Publicity Dept., C.WS, Manchester, England. Page 33.
erated into the Cooperative Wholesale Society of England and Wales (C.W.S.)
and the Scottish Cooperative Wholesale Society of Scotland (S.C.W.S.). Local
stores supplied by the two great wholesale organizations can provide every-
thing needed in the home. About 180,000 workers are employed in the retail
division of the society. In 1984 the total membership in the C.W.S. and
S.C.W.S. 'exceeded seven million. Total retail sales approached the 500 mil-
lion dollar mark. The combined capital investment exceeds 400 million dollars
and the net surplus is about seven million dollars. During the past five
years
there has been a trend toward consolidation of the smaller retail outlets
into
larger and more efficient stores. This accounts for a decrease of 100 stores
since 1980.
     2. Industrial Cooperative Production-Cooperatively owned and operated
industries had been the objective of the English workingmen for a century
be-
fore it was definitely achieved. The gradual expansion of the C.W.S. in the
retail distributive field and finally into manufacturing rescued the idea
and
made it a reality only after many unsuccessful isolated attempts. The pur-
pose of the C.W.S. and the S.C.W.S. is to integrate production and distribution
through the various stages from raw material to the final sale of the finished
goods. To this end they have established about 150 factories throughout
England, Scotland and Wales. More than 70 thousand workers are engaged
in manufacturing or providing services to the members of the society.
          "The varied character of the factories is astonishing. Biscuits
and
     cakes are produced at Crumpsill and Cardiff; preserves of all kinds
at
     Middleton, Clayton, Reading and Acton; margarine at Higher Irlam;


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