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University of Wisconsin. Dept. of Agricultural Journalism / 22 community building advertisements : use them to bring your bank greater prestige, increased goodwill, more business
([1930])

Chapman, C. J.
Add lime and shake well PDF (272.8 KB)



Release Week Beginning October 27
Add Lime and Shake Well
By C. J. Chapman
WwaconaM College
of Agriculture
I KNOW a farmer in Waupaca county who two years
ago bought a 220 acre worn-out, abandoned farm for
about $20.00 an acre. He invested $6.00 an acre for fer-
tilizer and $12.00 for lime, and now one of the most beau-
tiful alfalfa crops in the county covers 132 acres on his
farm. Today, his land is easily worth $75.00 an acre. His
experience can readily be duplicated on thousands of
acres of now almost barren wastes.
              In applying the lime mix it thoroughly with the land
           so that it becomes evenly distributed for the roots, acts
           more quickly, and is of most use to the crop. It's best to
           spread lime over plowed land, disk it in thoroughly, and
           follow it with a cultivated crop, such as corn, which will
           derive some benefit from the lime. Next year follow the
           cultivated crop with some legume.
              The amount of lime to apply varies with the kind of
           soil. Some soils require about four tons to the acre and
           on others two tons will suffice. Still other soils, of course,
           do not need lime at all.
              A simple, easy way to know just how much lime your
           soil needs for the best possible returns is to write the
           State Soils Laboratory, Wisconsin College of Agriculture,
           Madison. The service tells you precisely what your land
           needs for larger crops. . . . Write them now.
      "For Farm Prosperity"
[Name of Your Bank]
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