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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIV ([covers January 1935/December 1935])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIV, no. 1,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [1]


WISCONSIN
W>1 A! L lf~t ! ivt. i
S.AT L.C 1)(Ct!"N; NT
WL5. LEG. REF. LIBRARY
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC
Bureau of Agricultural Economi
S. J. GILBERT. Assistant Agricultural Sta
Vol. XIV, No. 1
tULTUREF
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICU7LTURE & MARKKTS
cs                                  Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING., Agricultural Statistician
tisticlan                                  W. D. BORMUTH, Junior Statistician
State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin                          January, 1935
I N WISCONSIN the crop season of 1934
was marked by low production and poor
crop conditions. The season was dry from
the beginning and while the spring plant-
ing was done at about the usual time on a
good seed bed the crops came along very
slowly because of lack of moisture. Ex-
cept for a strip in eastern Wisconsin and
along Lake Michigan, and a few of the
northernmost counties the entire state was
suffering greatly for lack of moisture in
May. and by the beginning of June the
condition was probably the most serious
on record. In June the heat and drought
were broken, and shortly after the middle
of the month most of the state had fairly
good rains. Growing conditions improved
materially through July. but the rain and
improved growing conditions came too late
for hay which has made the shortest crop
since 1901.
The early grain crops such as winter
wheat and rye made extremely low pro-
duction because, like the hay crops, their
early maturity caused them to suffer more
than the later maturing crops. Barley
and oats improved greatly after the nmid-
June rains, and these grains made ai large.
yield and better quality grain for the state
IF,
as a whole than they did in 1933 when the
grain was generally light. In eastern
Wisconsin a considerable area had excel-
lent grain crops, the poorest grain in the
state being reported In the regions of
most severe drought, such as northwestern
Wisconsin and in some of the southern
counties along the Illinois line.
Corn with a record acreage mijad a cr(lop
estimated at about 74 million bushels,
which while smaller than the corn crop of
the previous two years has been exceeded
only five times in the state's history. The
grain production of the corn crop was
somewhat smaller than expected, but the
stalk growth In most counties was large
so that the state's livestock population is
dependent during the current winter to an
unusual extent upon corn fodder and corn
silage.
The cash crops of the state made varied
returns. The potato crop was large and
the quality better than usual, but prices
have been disappolinting. Tobacco made a
good yield on the smallest acreage since
1898. The cabbage crop was large but
prices were disappointing. The canning
pea crop was light but better than in the
previous two years when it had suffered
extremely from heat and drought. Tree
fruits were a short crop, and most of the
minor crops made less than average pro-
duction. The total acreage in the more
important crops for the state was 8,758,000
which Is nearly a half million acres less
than in the previous year which was
largely due to the immense losses inl hay.
In spite of the greatly reduced production
SUMMARY OF WISCONSIN CROP ACREAGE, PRODUCTION, PRICES, AND VALUES, 1933,
1934.
Crop
CEREALS
Corn            ..
Oats .       .      ......      ...
Barley ..........  ..  ...
Rye ..       ....    ..
S  p  rn w eat... ........ ..   ...   ...
Winter wheat.....
Buckwheat..............
OTHER GRAINS AND GRASSlES
Dry peas.       ...........
Dry edible beaun........
Soy Beans for grain .
Flax ............
Clover seed .     .
Sweet clover seed .     .
Timothy seed......
Alfalfa seed.......
HAY AND FORAGE
Al tame hay.......
Alfalfa hay.............
All dover and timothy bay..
Sweet clover hay......
Annual legume hay...
Grain cut gren for hay ........
Millet. Sudngram, other miscellaneous hay
Wild hay ...................
OTHER FIELD CROPS
Potatoes .......   . -
Tobacco ......
Cabbage for market
Cabbage for kraut.....
Onions, commercial.........
Hemp .......
Sugar beets ....           .....
Cucumbers for pickles ... .  ...
Peas for canning........
Corn for canning . .
Snap beans for canning .
Beets for canning.
FRUITS
Apples........... ..... .
Cherries ....
Cranberries ......
Maple sugar....
Maple sirup....
Strawberries .
Grapes.......
Grand Total....
Acreage
(000 omitted'
j. _.  I  -  .
1934       1933
(Prelim I
2,:384     2,228
2,334      2,457
1   741        805
221   '    226
9    F j   72
18        :12
24         17
2)1
6
i: 4
2,40))
525
1,242
36
152
18))
315
135.
2617
7.5
16.4
6.6
I
.5 I
19 .
11. 3
I1129
Ill9
B. 6
..it',
18
4
'70
2:1(
'3
2.3
2:1)1
2,1)41)
542
2,W83
33
52
144
170
2:150
239
12.6
9.2
3
1.1
17. 9
66.
:16
4. 2
3  11
.9
2        2 I
3201       '280
3. 15!    3
.    ...1 ___
8,758.12  9.217.6,3
Yield per Acre
1934
IPrelim.x
28 0
26.:)
8. 4
Ill. )
I I i. ,)
11.3
15.5
16.38!
II.()
4.0
3. 2
1 2
,Y!l,
I. 5
I 1.3
I .I 4(
1.0
90
124).(X
1,340)
8.27
410
850
48.
1,27).
2.;   I
4 4
I...
1933
3.) )
26;. 0}
22.0)
14.7
11 (4
I 3
1.25
I .5.5
I :)
1. 26
1.10
20. 0)
1,272
I6. 25X
6.20
291)
7501
84
10
,80.
1,272
8. 0
51.
1,5
I ~  ~
Production
(000 omitted)
9       l 93   UlF i
t914    1933  !'
11  ,    P . ; i
I_       _I
7:3,904     77,0 80
i  05,352   413,882
19),266     17,71)J
1 7(i8      2 226)0
't440   1   1,102
2)17   1    464
271         187
:11)   1    :3)1
:38.3
)G)
z. S
II5.0
5.6
I .1
48
2,422
788
807
47
21:1
1,1
34)1
321
31,321)
1)1,1)01
1:15. 4
11. 8
411)
427
162
742
142.240
2,7.4
7 .8
12
1,20)4
4.4
09        !
:! 1)1
73:
274
33..3
419
40
112
10.5
6.)
46.8
3.68r0
1,'111
l, Ill
.51
78
122
221)
385
1)1,7)))
I 16,02:3
57.0
18 1t
1)50
1409,74))
' If   I
',4
,.8
1,U38
7. 04
47.
24
62
195)
3S7
'Not incluiled in acreage grown for hay.     2 Not induded in total asreage.
       Trees tapped.
lus.
Bus.
Bus.
BIts.
13 us.
Itou,.
Ito,.
B1us.
IHIIY.
Bus.
B11, .
Bus.
'I o,
Tolls
Tons
Toils
ions
Tons
Tois
Tong
Biu,..
Lbs.
Tons
Toils
Blis,.
lbs.
Tol.s
Tons
1934
(Prelim.
I-     t _.  Si.   I
!         48
I . 1:3
.73
i         4 i
I         fir,  I
2 . ads
I      I . 25i
1. 5.;
!   4. 80
8  I||}
43t 4(1
1933       1934        1933,
1 (Prelim.)
1i.41   4.15,428   3831,972
3I     31,3611     !1,8111
.52    19,844       I,2(B
57      1,2!11      1,288
7       1382    :    876
, (i      ta 1}  I    153
;z;; pI 17    tis10
1
1 I
85
I. 4))
it- 4(:
2, 65
_', :15"
, 90
I.-sIl)        i   11). If'    i
i        1
1I  amp ( i 21)
I
7 81
6 :1I
ti.t V!
. 53:s
S. ms  1
4:!
8 Is.   I
42. (it}
17. 1))
5))
I))5
., .) r.r(
. I(
.4))22
.7. 20t
I 2lk)
Tonls       7.80 F    7 20
Bus.        I .2  1     8o
Ton..        .        .(x ) 3o
BbOls.      1. 75     I, 7-
(LrateM     .28        .2I
(Soal,.     1.75      1.055
Crates      2.00      1.If
Toni       750.)     ,)0.)(N
IN THIS ISSUE
1934 Wisconsin Crop
Production
Stocks of Grain on Farms
Milk and Egg Production
Cold Storage Holdings
Prices of Farm Products
Farm Price           PFarm Value
000 omitted)
6 12
.51
i       (RI
7 1,7
:       29.
717
I      .
:17,218
.     . 'I
1 2:W8
J  %202,
*    845 .
1,7
8 2'
1:5 :-
J2,414; .
220 ,
I     Si
_!,
86i
1,29 1i
.1:1
.,1)813
772,
I 1,4)i
21,7
2 1
851
(12
'4
1,505)    1 , riifl,
22))       352
5075       317
1          6
52         08
:34);      370
21         25
177.,9)i   122,954
I
.
l
-
I
..-. i
I
I Not included in acreage grown for hay.
I Not included in total acreage.       3 Trees tapped.


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