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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Transactions of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society. Proceedings, essays and reports at the annual winter meetings, held at Madison, Feb. 1, 2 and 3, 1870 and Feb. 7, 8 and 9, 1871
(1871 [covers 1870/1871])

[Business],   pp. 20-26 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 22


22       WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY.
DIVISION OF THE STATE INTO DISTRICTS.
The question was discussed-" Shall the state be divided into
districts? "
Mr. LAWRmNCz could see objections to a division of the state; and at the
same
time, owing to climatic influences, he was aware that some sorts and varieties
of
fruits did better farther north than in the southern portion of the state,
and a divis-
ion might develop important facts in that direction.
Mr. McAmF said that the horticulturists of Illinois had at first divided
the state
into three districts. The state society overlooks the whole state, and these
districts
take care of themselves and the local matters. Now the state was divided
by the
geological character of the country into seven districts.  The Rock river
region,
which embraced nearly all the northern part of the state, is on the Galena
lime
stone, and has essential differences from the region farther south, On this
forma-
tion quinces will not grow, and pears on quince stocks also faiL  Grapes
require
more protection, but are less liable to rot than in the other formations.
He pre-
snmed that Wisconsin was similarly situated.
Mr. WITLEY thought the state could be divided into the lake shore, the prairie
and the sand regions, with advantage, and different sorts recommended for
each
locality.
Mr. LAWRENCE had no doubt the soil had a great influence in many respects
upon
the trees that grew in it. 'Some required one kind of soil and some another.
Mr. STIcKNEY had often noticed the difference between one kind of soil and
an-
other; but in the timber, whether sand or gravel, fruit grew better than
in the open
grounds. He was not certain as to the cause of the difference, but his apple
trees
were always firmer and freer from injury there than in the prairies. Some
attrib-
ute this to the soil, and some to the greater protection that he received
near the
lake, and from the greater fall of snow.
M Mr. TUTTLE was satisfied that some varieties grew and did better away from
the
influence of the lake than others. The Fameuse does not succeed near the
lake nor
in damp soil, but is well adapted to a dry, sandy soil. Some trees could
be pruned
to an open top, so as to be dry and airy; such did well; others required
close tops.
The character of the soil should be considered in pruning, so as to create
or avoid
dampness.
Mr. LAWRExNc-There is a marked difference between timber and prairie soil
in the growth of trees.
Mr. TUTTLE-I have noticed that some varieties do well on rich prairies, and
vice versa. The Bellfleur is worthless in rich prairie soil, so are the Wagner
and
others he could name. Some do well in almost all soils.
Judge KN'PP was glad to hear this discussion; it was a step in the right
direc-
tion. He had long been of the opinion, that the question of wphere we should
grow
certain trees, was of as much importance as what should be grown. All know
that
certain kinds of trees grow in a certain kind of soil, and in particular
climatic con-
ditions. Any observing man could tell from the native vegetations, what was
the


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