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Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / Transactions of the Wisconsin State Horticultural Society. Proceedings, essays and reports at the annual winter meetings, held at Madison, Feb. 1, 2 and 3, 1870 and Feb. 7, 8 and 9, 1871
(1871 [covers 1870/1871])

[Business],   pp. 20-26 PDF (1.4 MB)


Page 21


TRANSACTIONS FOR 1870.
COMMITYEES APPOINTED.
Committee to prepare and bring forward business, Messrs.
KELLOGG, TUTTLE and GREENMAN.
To confer with the State Agricultural Society in relation to
the annual exhibition, Messrs. HoILE, MASON and STICKNEY.
INDEPENDENT MEETINGS.
Considerable discussion arose upon the propriety of holding
faiss independent of the State Agricultural Society, in which
Messrs. LAWRENCE, KELLOGG, PLUMB, HoiLE, WILLEY, STILLSON
and DANIELLS took a part. This discussion manifested a growing
desire for an independent organization, and action, as soon as it
could be done, but resulted in referring a resolution that the
committee of conference be instructed to ask for $700, to be dis-
tributed in premiums; and also that this society select one of the
speakers for the annual fair.
The committee of conference subsequently reported that they
had agreed with the agricultural society about the annual fair, and
that that society had appropriated to this society $600 for premi-
ums for the exhibition, to pay the usual incidental expenses,
and give the horticultural society a voice in the selection of a
speaker, if one was secured. The report was accepted and the,
State Agricultural Society so notified.
WEDNESDAY, 9 A. M.
President HOBBINS in the chair.
The report of the committee on Nomenclature being called in
its order, its consideration was postponed for the present.
ZNGLISH SPARROWS.
Dr. HOBBINS, from the committee appointed at the last meet-
ing, reported that he had found it quite questionable whether
the introduction of these birds would be beneficial or not. They
were generally considered as a nuisance in England, where they
were best known. However desirable they might be, they could
not be procured at present, in this country.
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