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Wisconsin Dairymen's Association / Fortieth annual report of the Wisconsin Dairymen's Association : held at Beloit, Wis., November, 1911. Report of the proceedings, annual address of the president, and interesting essays and discussions relating to the dairy interests
(1912)

Norgord, C. F.
Silage,   pp. 12-19 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page 16


Portieth Annual Report of the
cal composition would indicate. Tests of this matter as shown below
made as Vermont and Wisconsin.
Milk Production.
Wisconsin       .......................
Vermont..........................
From Silage.                From Fodder.
Milk.         Fat.          Milk.         Fat.
741 lbs.        310.4          7330        318.2
8   l Ib .  ..............    7dsS..        :
As shown by this table silage produced 828 lbs. or 11% more milk
at Vermont and 377 lbs. or 5% more milk at Wisconsin. In addition
at Wisconsin the silage produced 22 lbs. or 7% more butter fat than
the fodder corn.
SILAGE WITH AND WITHOUT EARS OF CORN.
Some persons are loth to see the ears go into the silo and therefore
advocate snapping off the ears and making silage from the stalks alone.
Hilles of the Vermont station conducted an experiment wherein equal
areas of corn were siloed with and without the ears. In feeding the
silzge having no grain, the ears snapped from this area were fed as
ground feed in connection with the silage. On the completion of this
experiment, it was found that one acre of silage with ears was worth
for milk production 1.26 acres where the ears were snapped off and
fed as ground feed.
It will thus be seen that the best use is made of corn when put up
as silage. The silo is, therefore, the most efficient tool on the farm
for saving, storing and utilizing the crops on the farm.
;RAFQIn VARV VAR RTT ANV
The chief changes taking place in corn during freezing is a burst-
ing of the cell walls and a consequent loss of the cell moisture by
evaporation. As a result of this, after a frost we see the corn rapidly
drying up. When water is applied to this corn in the silo the moisture
is returned to the cells and the silage formed becomes nearly normal
ftit                 and practically as good as silage from unfrozen corn.
Silage from
frozen corn does not heat so much as that from unfrozen corn. This
is due largely to the fact that the respiratory processes going on within
the normal cell were stopped when the cells were killed by the frost.
The possible losses from the use of frozen corn for silage lie In the
16
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I'
.1
'I
l -
U&I %;UULPUft1L1UU WUUIU ALIUM&M. AVULD UL L"10 JUMLtUl AB B"UWU
AUW
made as Vermont and Wisconsin.
Milk Production.
Wisconsin . .......................
Vermont ..........................
From Silage.               From Fodder.
Milk.         Fat.          Milk.         Fat.
1
7416 lbs.      310.4           7330        318.2
81281b  .    ..............    7dbg    ..............
, I
As shown by this table silage produced 828 lbs. or Ile more milk
at Vermont and 377 lbs. or 5% more milk at Wisconsin. In addition
at Wisconsin the silage produced 22 lbs. or 7% more butter fat than
the fodder corn.
SILAGE WITH AND WITHOUT EARS OF CORN.
Some persons are loth to see the ears go into the silo and therefore
advocate snapping off the ears and making silage from the stalks alone.
Hilles of the Vermont station conducted an experiment whe'rein equal
areas of corn were siloed with and without the ears. In feeding the
silFge having no grain, the cars snapped from this area were fed as
ground feed In connection with the silage. On the completion of this
experiment, it was found that one acre of silage with ears was worth
for milk production 1.26 acres where the ears were snapped off and
fed as ground feed.
It will thus be seen that the best use is made of corn when put up
as silage. The silo is, therefore, the most efficient tool on the farm
for saving, storing and utilizing the crops on the farm.
F'RosTED CosN FOR SILAGE.
The chief changes taking place in corn during freezing is a burst-
ing of the cell walls and a consequent loss of the cell moisture by
evaporation. As a result of this, after a frost we see the corn rapidly
drying up. When water is applied to this corn in the silo the moisture
is returned to the cells and the silage formed becomes nearly normal
and practically as good as silage from unfrozen corn. Silage from
frozen corn does not heat so much as that from unfrozen corn. This
is due largely to the fact that the respiratory processes going on within
the normal cell we're stopped when the cells were killed by the frost.
The possible losses from the use of frozen corn for silage lie In the
The chief changes taking place in corn during freezing is a burst-
ing of the cell walls and a consequent loss of the cell moisture by
evaporation. As a result of this, after a frost we see the corn rapidly
drying up. When water is applied to this corn in the silo the moisture
is returned to the cells and the silage formed becomes nearly normal
and practically as good as silage from unfrozen corn. Silage from
frozen corn does not heat so much as that from unfrozen corn. This
is due largely to the fact that the respiratory processes going on within
the normal cell we're stopped when the cells were killed by the frost.
The possible losses from the use of frozen corn for silage lie In the


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