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Wisconsin Dairymen's Association / Thirty-first annual report of the Wisconsin Dairymen's Association : held at Fond du Lac, Wis., February 11, 12 and 13, 1903. Report of the proceedings, annual address of the president, and interesting essays and discussions relating to the dairy interests
(1903)

Reitbrock, Fred
Dairy possibilities in northern Wisconsin,   pp. 158-168 PDF (2.6 MB)


Page 168

 
168        T1irt~y-ftrsi Amwnu  Report of tAe 
the farm in the shape of fire wood, building material, etc., and 
give a little park for the family and shade for the herd and at 
the same time maple sugar for the children.  lhis will also 
leave to the country that 1omantic and park like appearane 
which does so much to injake it a desirable and ar.tive place 
for a home. Cultivate and pasture 80 acres of the farm. Upon- 
this there will be no diflioultv in maintaining 20 eows in milk 
the ycar round, and to raise the desirable young stock for the 
maintenance and improvement of the herd. TIhere will aso be 
ample room for the raising of 50 to 60 pigs to be annually 
turned off. 
Twenty cows, on 25,000 farms will give us 500,000 cows, and 
it seems to me the great majority of the farmers in northern 
Wisconsin, after the example of Mr. Griswold, will grade up to 
a perfect dairy herd from the common cows of the country U.- 
the use of pure bred dairy sires. In doing this they should not 
mix the breeds. Keep the breeds separate, as it were, by fences 
"horse high and bull tight."  The pure bred bull has dairy 
heredity; the half blood has it not, and is therefore a scrub. 
The pure bred of the same breed should always be used. 
Let them work on these lines, with good judgment and care, 
and success Will be theimi. 
Here then we have the country with sparkling water, a de- 
lightful and bracing climate, a deep and productive soil, carry- 
ing the humus shed asnnuallv by the forests for a thousand years, 
unrivaled railroad and water couiamunication with the great 
centers of population and to which are coning the young, the 
intelligent, the active and energetic. To them we can safely 
commnit the dairy possibilities ofinorthern Wisconsin. 


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