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Dexheimer, Florence Chambers, 1866-1925 / Sketches of Wisconsin pioneer women
([1924?] )

Schreiner, Lillian Stair
Mrs. Helen Whipple,   pp. 183-186 PDF (695.8 KB)


Page 184


Wis., but for some years she resided with a son in Chi-
cago. She attended several meetings of the Chicago
chapter D. A. R., and had been earnestly importuned by
both officers and members to join their society, but hav-
ing reached an age when it was hard to make new friends
she preferred to place her membership in the Fort Atkin-
son chapter to which many of her friends of an earlier
day, both in Fort Atkinson and Jefferson, belonged.
    Mrs. Whipple was the youngest of a family of 20
children, her father being in his 69th year when she was
born. He was twice married and had nine children by
his first wife and eleven by the second.
    He was born in East Haddam, Conn., July 30, 1760,
and died and was buried in Jefferson, Wis., in January,
1855. His grave is marked by a revolutionary soldier's
marker which was placed there by the George Rogers
Clark Society, children of the American Revolution of
Milwaukee and every year on Memorial Day the grave
is decorated with flowers by the Jefferson members of
the Fort Atkinson chapter, D. A. R.
    At the age of 13 he moved with his parents to Han-
over, N. H., and from there he enlisted in the continental
army, Capt. Stevens' company, Col. Nicolas' regiment at
the age of 15 years and served throughout the war as a
private. Giving Mrs. Whipple's own words, "he enlisted
as a private soldier and he fought through the desperate
struggle in the ranks." It was no easy matter to gain
promotion in those days-the maximum of the Declara-
tion of Independence "that all men were born equal" held
good and therefore I considered it no reflection upon my
father, Eliada Brown, to record the fact that he went
through the battles and skirmishes of the revolution as
a private."
    Mr. Brown took part in a great many skirmishes and
was in the battle of Bennington and that of Stillwater
and was stationed at West Point in 1779 and was one
of Major Arnold's body guard at the time he turned
traitor to the American cause.
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