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Dexheimer, Florence Chambers, 1866-1925 / Sketches of Wisconsin pioneer women
([1924?] )

Bostwick, Mary
Helen Bailey Bostwick,   pp. 116-118 PDF (612.7 KB)


Kent, Antoinette Cowles
Anna Wealthy Moody Flack,   pp. 118-120 PDF (581.8 KB)


Page 118


B. Bostwick, Mrs. A. W. Mayhew, Mark Bostwick, and
Mary L. Bostwick. Mr. Bostwick died July 23, 1913. He
was a resident of Janesville for sixty-six years, and for
fifty years of that time was identified with the mercantile
business of the city.
........ .u .... . ........................................ ......  .. .
..u.UI,   ............................. ............,
       ANNA WEALTHY MOODY FLACK
          Author-Antoinette Cowles Kent
                       Beloit
6 1 ........................*.................................... u...........
. ................C.. . ..l... ... ..
    Anna Moody was born at South Hadley, Massachu-
setts, July 30, 1830; married January 26, 1882 to David
L. Flack at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Died at Elkhorn,
October 1, 1909, after sixteen years of widowhood and
two years of failing health.
    She was the seventh of ten children of Spencer
Moody and Wealthy Montague. Her brother, Austin
Moody of Lake Geneva and Duluth was the surviving
member of the family. Her ancestors came early to New
England and were of that choice seed which God winnow-
ed from four kingdoms for sowing these colonies.
    At fifteen she was a teacher at Northfield.
    She laid the basis of her higher usefulness by enter-
ing and graduating from Mt. Holyoke Seminary.
    She taught a few years in Eaton School, New Haven.
The lure of the West, the far west of Wisconsin was
upon her. Accompanied by her brother, she reached
Wisconsin in June, 1858. We will quote her own words
in her address at a reunion of her former pupils at Lake
Geneva, August 19, 1903: "When I came, it was too late
to engage a school for that year. In January of the year
following, I was invited to teach a school of eighty young
men and women at Genoa, completing the work at the
end of the school year.
    "September, 1859, I commenced teaching over Beams-
 ley's, with twenty pupils. Some of these went to the
 war, while the girls formed a knitting circle. The mit-
 tens had fingers as well as thumbs.
                         118


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