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Milwaukee Co-operative Milk Producers / Milwaukee milk producer
Volume 8 (April 1935/March 1936)

Milwaukee milk producer. Volume 8, number 3,   pp. [1]-8 PDF (5.8 MB)


Page 7


j Ultl,     AeaVAd_. ...  An d
Mr. Fletcher Says I      ..I .
One of the basic problems that the
fluid milk organizations may not be
giving enough consideration to is the
spread between the resale price of
condensed milk and fluid milk. This
spread during the past few years,
has been too wide, with the result
that many consumers changed from
fluid milk to canned milk.
This spread has been caused main-
ly because condenseries, located in
areas where their ctmpetition is
cheese and butter, have bought their
raw product at an extremely low
price as compared with fluid milk.
It is extremely doubtful whether
consumers would have turned to
Condensed milk in large volume, if
their purchasing power had re-
mained high, but with fluid milk at
10c per quart and canned milk at 6c
leer quart, the economic pressure
drove them to use the canned prod-
lict. .
We producers will eventually be
called upon to face this problem, and
unless some plan, either economic or
artificial, is devised to force the
price of condensed milk up, we will
be forced to see our retail price re-
duced or we shall find many more
people substituting canned milk for
our product.
Sometimes it is the little losses
that create some of our big losses,
and one of those little losses may be
filling milk cans too full.
When a can is too full, pressing
down the cover causes waste and
generally of very rich milk, for if
the milk is cold, cream rises rapidly
to the top. Not only is there consid-
erable waste, but the can becomes
unsightly when milk goes over the
side of it.
While at a hearing held by the
Department of Agriculture and Mar-
kets recently we heard a man who
thought himself big enough to offer
himself as a candidate for Governor
of this State last fall say that the
farmers in this milk shed were re-
eeiving $1.10 per hundred for their
milk. Inasmuch as we understood
he was representing the interests of
three comparatively new dairies, it
is probable that he was quoting their
figures. That may have been high
at that, but when he intimates that
that is the fluid price paid in his
market he either exhibits a collosal
amount of stupidity or has an ul-
terior motive in desiring to drive
down the fluid price to that figure.
Last summer when he ranged up
and down this State posing as a
"friend of the farmers" he should at
least have taken enough time off to
determine how milk is sold in mar-
kets, but that might have been too
large a job for him to handle. We
do notice though, that he is vitally
interested in seeing that labor and
the industry get their fair share and
that the farmer may have the poor
pickings that are left after they get
through. Well, Bill, I think that in
the future just as in the past the
vast majority of the farmers will be
too wise to fall for your oratory and
will still demand their honest share
of the consumers' dollar.
WORLD'S RECORD BROKEN FOR
LIFETIME MILK YIELD
The world's lifetime milk record
was recently broken by the regis-
tered Holstein cow named Highfield
Colantha Mooie 508736 owned by
John G. Ellis of Lee, Massachusetts.
In eleven lactations this cow has an
official credit of 205,928.5 pounds of
milk containing 7,128.5 pounds of
butterfat, according to a report is-
sued by the Holstein-Friesian Asso-
ciation of America. Her fat yield
ranks third on the national list. It
is rather hard to conceive what a
prodigious amount 205,928.5 pounds
of milk is. It is 102.9 tons or enough
to fill 2,394 ten-gallon cans. An av-
erage dairy cow yields about 22,000
pounds of milk during her lifetime
so it would take over nine average
cows to equal the yield of Highfield
Colantha Mooie. Two other cows,
both Holsteins, have topped the hun-
dred ton milk mark. Tilly Alcartra
held the world's record for many
years with a credit of 201,137.9
pounds. The famous Michigan Hol-
stein, Traverse Colantha Walker,
was in second place with a yield of
200,114.9 pounds. "Mooie" is a good
example illustrating the noted long-
evity of the Holstein breed. There
are at least fifty-two cows of the
breed in the United States with offi-
cial records totaling fifty tons or
more.
KEEP YOUR MILK PURE
STERILIZE ALL YOUR UTENSILS
* INSURES A LOW. BACTERIA
COUNT.
* WON'T RUST OR DAMAGE
UTENSILS.
* EASY AND ECONOMICAL TO
USE.
* WORKS INSTANTLY IN HOT OR
COLD WATER.
* COMPLIES WITH HEALTH
REGULATIONS.
Order Today From Your Milk Station
THE DIVERSEY CORPORATION
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
e
MLKING MACKIINE RUBBER
IrP All Make. *f Milk...
At Neatly Haf Polee
Ft" Idal-ImproveG teat-eup suit-
able for all pipeline milkers. Btter.
faster milking. Allowance made for
old shells. Save money on all milk-
Ing machine equlpment. Write for
_pric list today, stating name of
your machine.
RITE.WAY PRODUCTS Co
Dept. C. 41 N. TRev Avenue. Chleago
FOrl RALE-Milk Cooling Cabinets, new
4 and 6-can all-steel Cabinets. Will sell
cheap, need space.  New  and Used Ice
Machines. W-M Refrigeration Co., 2468
N. Third St.
COWS FOR SALE-Milkers, Springers.
Holstein and Guernseys. Bang's and T. B.
Tested. Easy terms. Theo. Klein & Son.
Menomonee Falls. Wis.
FOR SALE-One New Hydro-Vac Milk
Cooler at a bargain. 1633 N. 13th St.,
Milwaukee, Win.
WANT DEPARTMENT
RATEI- GENTs PER WORD
MISimum Chatge-.4LOS0
1ncow "ntluf amount of rell-
tssee aZ  Ix(6) extum woti eIt
tam  04111 ' 3     1S
bold Tnie-Double Regular Rates.
Blind Arem - 255 EXTRA to
cover . rate  In endlng out replies
ORDMANCE MUST ACCOMPANY
ORDER.
INVITING
Home Improvement Lomns
Loans for repairing and modernizing
your home are available at low cost
and repayable in monthly installments.
BADGER STATE BANK
Fornd du Lae and North at Slat St.
Fl-
7
XffTT.WAT11? V. AMW V11.0717TORR
-- IndoAR


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