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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 12,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page [1]


WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE        WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics           Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
Walter H. Ebling,
Emery C. Wilcox
C. D. Caparoon,
Agri ultural Statlitlclans
Vol. XXIX, No. 12              State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin        
      December 1950
IN THIS ISSUE
The 1950 Crop Report
Wisconsin had a better than
average crop year although
weather conditions were un-
usual. Hay and small grain
production was unusually good
and did much to offset the de-
cline in corn production from
the record crop of 1949. For
the nation, the total crop pro-
duction was the third iargest
on record.
Milk Production
Milk production on Wisconsin
farms in November was above
a year earlier while for the
nation a slight drop from No-
vember 1949 i3 reported. The
Wisconsin production was 14
percent above average, and an
increase of 4 percent over the
November average is shown for
the nation.
Egg Production
Total egg production on Wis-
consin farms in November was
the second largest on record
for the month, but it was 7
percent below the all-time No-
vember high of last year. For
the nation, egg production in
November was a record for the
month.
Current Trends
Cold storage holdings of but-
ter and cheese are above last
year. At the beginning of De-
cember stocks of eggs, shell,
were about one-tenth the hold-
ings of a year earlier. Slightly
more cattle and hogs were
slaughtered in November than
a year earlier, but slaughter of
sheep and lambs and calves was
smaller.
Prices Farmers Receive and
Pay
Most farm production items
showed some increase in price
from a year ago. The Wisconsin
index of prices received was 271
percent of the 1910-14 level or
about 7 percent above the index
of November last year. Prices
paid also increased almost 7
percent during the past year.
Special News Items
1950 Pig Crop (pages 3 and 4)
Number of Sows to Farrow
Next Spring
List of 1950 Special Items
THE    YEAR-END crop report for
Wisconsin shows a corn production
25 million bushels below the record
crop of 1949, but an increase in the
production of oats, barley, and hay
that goes a long way toward offset-
ting the reduction in corn. Generally
the state has had a better than
average crop year.
Wisconsin's 1950 crop season had
many unusual features. In the spring
cold and wet weather was experi-
enced which made spring planting
late. Only about one-third of the
usual amount of spring grain had
been planted by May 1, very little
being planted in the northern coun-
ties at that time. Generally grain
seeding was from two to three weeks
late. Hay and pasture started slowly
and growth in the early part of the
season was poor due to cold and wet
weather. Vegetation, however, had
come through the winter without
much damage except in some of the
east-central Wisconsin counties.
Some improvement took place in
May. Moisture continued above normal
in supply. In June general improve-
ment in crop prospects continued.
There was enough moisture and
in most sections of the state the
rains were well spaced. Unlike the
cool months that preceded and fol-
lowed it June was also warmer than
normal. Crop acreage changes were
small because hay had wintered well.
Acreage planted was smaller for corn,
wheat, potatoes, and flax, but larger
for barley, tobacco, and hay. July
and August were again wet and cool
with rather slow progress on the
part of most crops, but conditions
were favorable for second crops of
hay and pasture. Harvesting prog-
ress was slow because of wet weather.
September continued cool with a
heavy frost on the 24th which dam-
aged corn over much of the state.
Threshing results forthegrain crops,
however, showed them to be better
than was indicated earlier. October
and early November were warm and
dry. Weather was good for harvest-
ing fall crops and for drying out the
frozen corn. Pastures, however, got
rather short during this dry period.
Since late November, weather has
been unusually cold with an abund-
ance of snow.
The country too had a good crop
year, the output being the third
largest on record. The yield of crops
when taken as a whole was the
second best on record, and the favor-
able maturing and harvesting weather
in the fall helped to improve both
the quantity and the quality of the
nation's crops.
Weather Summary, November 1950
Station
Duluth..
Spooner.
Park Falls
Rhinelander
Wausau
Marinette--
Escanaba---
Minneapolis
Eau Claire..
La Crosse-_
Hancock.
Oshkosh
Green Bay.
Manitowoc
Dubuque.--
Madison
Beloit
Milwaukee
Average for
18 Stations
Temperature
Degrees Fahrenheit
B
S
T
.5
- 5
-8
-13
_11
_ 9
-8
- 7
-5S
-4
- 4
_19
- 8
- 7
-3
- 4
- 7
- 6
5
7.'
23.8
26.5
24.4
23.8
30.2
32.9
30.5
27.8
29.7
32.1
28.6
31.0
29.7
33.8
33.0
31.9
33.7
3Z.7
29.8
I
30.0
30.9
28.9
29.8
32.2
36.7
33.1
32.4
33.1
35.2
33.!
35.
34.6
36.2
37.6
35.2
37.2
35.9
33.
!
50
64
52
73
72
53
57
56
66
73
76
69
74
76
74
78
77
66.2
Precipitatlen
Inches
Z
2.00 1.45 +2.33
1.15 1.38 -0.03
2.66 I.86 3.13
1.59 1.72  1.60
0.79 1.72
1.20234   5.10
1.60 2.13 -3.18
089 1.27 -7.06
0.76 1.82 -6.98
0.49 1.56 -0.22
1.04 1.64 -3.56
0.89 1.89  4.01
1.12 2.16 -1.61
0.88 2.17 -6.85
1.39 1.70 +4.22
1.01 1.78 +7.56
1. 21 1.99  A
1.60 1.77+2.45
1.24 1.80 - 1.671
IAverage for 16 stations.
In Wisconsin feed supplies are ex-
cellent. Pastures were good during
much of the past year with the re-
sult that barn feeding during the
fall months was not heavy. Cash
crops made varying returns. There
were more potatoes than last year
because of high yields. Production of
tobacco, cabbage, onions, and canning
peas was also larger than a year
ago. The output of sweet corn, cucum-
bers, and lima beans was smaller.
Fruit crops showed small increases
over last year. Details on Wiscon-
sin's crop acreage and production for
1950 with comparisons are shown in
the accompanying table.
Mm5ImmMsXAMIqWMAtBURATM
Tbe ┬žbea50n'5 Oreetings
The excellent cooperation of
many farmers and businessmen
during the past year has made
possible the presentation of
current information on Wis-
consin's agriculture in the Wis-
consin Crop and Livestock Re-
porter. We have greatly appre-
ciated this help of our many re-
porters. To our reporters, read-
ers, and other friends, we send
our best wishes for the holiday
season.
The Wisconsin Crop
Reporting Service
3136383                                 it3iIa3d
Im
I
2
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