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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 11,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page 4


WISCONSIN CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
November 1950
1910-14 base period. For the first
time in 9 months the average price
received by farmers for cotton was
below a month earlier. Dairy prod-
ucts and eggs were up as is usual
for this time of year. Rice, cotton-
seed, sheep, and wool were other
important commodities showing siz-
able price increases during the month
ended in mid-October.
At the same time, the parity index
held steady at the revised September
level 261 percent of the 1910-14 base.
Increases in prices for consumer
goods and for building materials,
feeder cattle, and lambs were gener-
ally offset by lower prices for feed
and downturns in farm wage rates.
Farm Machinery
Rental Rates
Within recent years there has been
definite progress toward more farm
mechanization in Wisconsin. Farm la-
bor shortages, high wage rates, and
the introduction of better labor-sav-
ing machines have encouraged this
trend.
Because of these circumstances,
farmers have rather widespread in-
terest in machinery rental rates. The
initial survey dealing with machinery
rental rates was published in the
Wisconsin State Department of Agri-
culture Bulletin No. 241. The infor-
mation in this bulletin was revised in
1946 and published in the May 1948
issue of the "Wisconsin Crop and
Livestock Reporter". This informa-
tion on machinery rental rates has
again been brought up to date by a
recent survey which is presented in
detail in the accompanying table.
Rental rates pertain to those charges
made for farm equipment when the
equipment only is rented out for
farm work. These rates are different
from farm custom rates which in-
volve costs of having farm work done
on a hired basis, that is, custom work
done by men who have machinery for
performing specific farm operations
and also furnishing part or all of the
labor.
Although the practice of renting
out farmn machines by themselves is
not generally widespread throughout
the state, it is important in some
localities where custom work is not
available. Rental rates given below
apply only to cases where the equip-
ment itself is rented out for a fee and
should not be confused with exchange
work between farmers or cooperative
ownership of farm machinery or cus-
tom rates.
In this survey crop reporters were
asked to report rental charges in
their locality on various methods of
renting common with particular ma-
chines. For most of them the per day,
per hour, or per acre rates seem to
prevail. The rates given in the table
are averages of the reported figures
for the state as a whole and may be
above or below prevailing charges in
a particular locality.
Since 1946 machine rental charges
to farmers have shown a general in-
crease in most cases. The average
rental charge for a light two-plow
tractor was $1.56 an hour in 1946
compared with $1.65 an hour in 1949;
or an increase of about 6 percent. A
grain combine of 4 feet or less witn-
out tractor cost the farmer $2.65 an
hour or $3.00 an acre in 1946. The
average rental rates for the same
item in 1949 were $3.33 an hour or
$4.01 an acre. These figures show
rental rate increases of 26 percent on
an hourly basis and 34 percent on an
acre basis for the three-year period.
Rental Rates Rising
Hourly rental charge increases for
other farm machinery, 1946 to 1949,
were four-row tractor-drawn corn
planters 22 percent, two-bottom trac-
tor plows 11 percent, hay mowers
with tractor 2 percent, tractor-drawn
grain binders 4 percent, and grain
combines 5 feet and over without
tractor 20 percent.
As reported by the two surveys
rental charges for some farm ma-
chinery items were higher in 1946
than in 1949. Hourly rental rates as
shown by the 1946 survey for three
items that exceeded those reported in
1949 were: pick-up hay balers 11 per-
cent, stationary hay balers 15 per-
cent, and forage harvesters with
blower 2 percent. With more of these
machines in operation than three
years ago competition became sharper
and rental charges were reduced.
This decline was -tot general for all
farm machinery rentals. Increased
rates from 1946 to 1949 were largely
due to higher farm machine prices
and corresponded rather proportion-
ally with increases in the general
level of prices paid by farmers dur-
ing that period. Higher new and used
machinery prices have made it neces-
sary for the machine owner to in-
crease the charge for a particular
machine.
Farm Machinery
Rental Rates
Kind of Equipment
Tractors
Small one-plow        .
Light two-plow        .
Heavy three-plow
Crawlers
Tillage Equipment
Plows, tractor-drawni
one-bottom     .
two-bttom       .
three-bottom
DMst harrows
tandem           -       -
single --   ---  - ---------
Fild cultivator (quack digger)
Limo and Fertilizer Spreaders
Lime
Lime and fertilizer
Manure
Ensilage and Haying Equipment
Ensilage cutters
14" (no power)     .
15" and over (no power) ---
Forage harvesters
with blower and auxiliary motor
(no power)     .
with auxiliary motor -
without auxiliary motor --
Crop blower        .
4-wheel wagon with forage rack
and unloader, rubber mounted
Seeding and Cultivating Equipment
Grain drills
plain        .
with fertilizer attachment ---
Corn planters (tractor)
two-row.--  - - - -- - - - -
four-row -
Corn cultivators
one-row and tractor
two-row and tractor.
Harvesting Equipment
Grain binder (tractor-drawn).
Corn binder
one-row (tractor-drawn)  .
Grain combine, alone
4   ft.-- - - - - - - - - - - -
5 ft. and over     .
Corn pickers
one-row plus tractor ----
two-row plus tractor   .
Mower plus tractor      .
Side rake (tractor-drawn)  .
Average Rates
Reported
Per
Day
$
136
5. 80
3.63
5.36
Per
Hour
S1.24
1. 65
2.29
5.35
.47
.61
.78
.55
.50
.45
.44
.52
.52
1.34
1.70
7.50
6.36
4.47
1.30
.80
.64
.84
57
83
1.55
1.97
2.19
1. 59
3.33
4.40
3.81
4.88
2.06
.49
Hayloader, atone               59
Pickup balers, machine only  . .  4.40
Stationary balers, machine only. 2. 20
Per
Acre
S
;1.32
1.17
1.22
2. 12
4.01
3.74
5.44
4.07
1.45
.29
.70
I . .-
tMachine only. No tractor furnished.
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURE ECONOMICS
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
RETURN AFTER FIVE DAYS TO
AGRICULTURAL STATISTICIAN
IIOX 351
MADISON, WISCONSIN
Form BAE-A/11/50-2.676  Permit 1001
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE TO AVOID
PAYMENT OF POSTAGE, $300
L.JOIS!A'rIII-. !._Ft-CE LIBRARY,
STATE CAPITOL,
MADISON, WIS.
NCR
1
(44)


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