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The banker-farmer news bulletin
(1920-1924)

Dinsmore, Wayne
The Banker-farmer news bulletin. Bulletin no. 18: the future of the horse industry PDF (1.1 MB)



                           HORSE NUMBERS INCREASE IN CITIES.
                 As cost comparisons become apparent,-both on farms and in
cities,-horse
  -          replacement is taking place to a certain, but very noticeable,
degree. The low
             point was passed over a year ago. . Chicago work horses have
increased more
             than ten per cent in the last year; Philadelphia work horses
have increased
             twenty-five per cent; the condition is developing in many other
leading cities.
             Horses and mules on farms have lost none of their preeminence
from competi-
             tion with mechanical motive power, but the standard for marketable
types has
             been forced to a higher level.
                                THE 1912 MODEL WORK HORSE.
                  The conclusion, therefore, is that the Wisconsin farmer
will do well to
              breed his good mares this spring to a first class stallion.
Drafters, 16.2 to 17
              hands in height, deep bodied, strong backed, weighing from
1600 pounds up,
              are in greatest demand because they are very scarce. Wagon
horses and ex-
              pressers, or horses approximating these types,-weighing from
1300 to 1600
              pounds, 16 hands in height, with short backs and good middles,
sure footed
              and active, have sold very readily whenever they have appeared
on the market.
              They make excellent utility horses for farms and also are suited
to delivery
              work in cities. Farm chunks, including horses ranging from
1200 to 1500
              pounds, that are not good enough to go as expressers or wagon
horses, because
              of some lack in conformation,, quality or action, are good
serviceable horses for
    _- -      hard steady work on farms, but find very little outlet to city
firms. There is
              splendid demand all over the country for saddle horses and
hunters, but their
              production should not be attempted unless real saddle type
or Thoroughbred
              sires are available.
                                    WISCONSIN- SHOULD ACT.
E Ij              A higher standard is required now than heretofore. Inferior,
unsound
              horses lose money for the breeder and all subsequent owners.
It will be the
              better for Wisconsin agriculture and business as a whole, to
resume horse
              breeding this spring, using intelligent selection in order
to produce the kind pf
              work stock that performs efficiently on farms and sells for
a fair price when
              turned onto the market.
I1. Chadiourle Am..
I.
i
I T.
   The Banker-Farmer Exchange
                     18 IN A POSITION TO GIV     '
   Information as to -where good stallions, brood mares and work-
horses can be obtained at reasonable prices.
         we,  . ha  1nwrge listings of dairy cattle for sale of all breeds.
    we also na-v- -is W--
For particula's
         get in touch with
Ranker-Farmer Exchange
       D. H. Otis, Director.
Madisam, Wih
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LI '41 -                                                                
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