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Farmer co-ops in Wisconsin

Source:

Bell, Florence C. (Florence Colfax), 1899-
Farmer co-ops in Wisconsin
St. Paul, Minnesota: St. Paul Bank for Cooperatives, [1941]
56 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

URL to cite for this work: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/WI.FarmerCoops

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Contents

[Cover] Farmer co-ops in Wisconsin

Farmer co-ops in Wisconsin, pp. 1-2

Co-ops rank high in length of service, pp. 2-4

Farmers organized mutuals many years ago, pp. 4-5

Pioneers began cooperation, pp. 5-6

Number of cooperatives has greatly increased, pp. 6-7

Grange fostered cooperation, pp. 7-8

Wisconsin Society of Equity initiated broad program, pp. 8-9

State aids cooperatives, pp. 9-10

University of Wisconsin promotes cooperation, p. 10

Wisconsin ranks first in dairying, pp. 10-11

Butter tops dairy sales, pp. 11-12

Barron creamery makes large sales of cream, pp. 12-13

Land O'Lakes carries butter all the way to retailer, pp. 13-15

Butter quality program has been effective, pp. 15-16

Badger state makes half of U. S. cheese, pp. 16-18

Bargaining co-ops help stabilize markets, pp. 18-19

Associations render a variety of services, pp. 19-20

Madison cooperative guarantees payment to producers, pp. 20-21

Co-op distributors serve thousands of consumers, pp. 21-22

Customers kept informed of marketing situations, p. 22

Dairy distributers cooperative retails in Milwaukee, pp. 22-23

Byproducts and specialties add to dairy income, pp. 23-24

Revolving-capital plan is popular, pp. 24-26

Livestock continues on co-op route, pp. 26-27

Many local co-ops strengthened by equity, pp. 27-28

Equity uses many educational aids, p. 28

Shipping co-ops organized, p. 29

Breeders sell cooperatively, pp. 29-30

Co-ops market wide variety of fruits and vegetables, pp. 30-31

Door County peninsula noted for cherries, pp. 31-32

Northern Wisconsin cooperative tobacco pool carries on, pp. 32-33

Wool co-op conducts state-wide business, pp. 33-34

Eggs and poultry, pp. 34-[35]

Pelts marketed on nation-wide basis, pp. 36-37

Other commodities marketed cooperatively, p. 37

Rapid gains made in cooperative purchasing, pp. 37-39

Many local associations affiliated with wholesales, pp. 39-40

Central sells to 200 associations, pp. 40-44

Co-ops provide farm business services, pp. 44-45

Farmers operate telephone and irrigation mutuals, p. 45

Power program adopted, pp. 45-46

Farm homes wired, p. 46

Frozen-food lockers a new co-op service, pp. 46-47

Breeders' associations improve cattle, p. 47

Mortgage credit and production credit available, pp. 48-49

Production loans finance wide variety of farm needs, pp. 49-50

Credit has role in development of cooperatives, pp. 50-52

Cooperative assets top 18 million dollars, p. 52

Wisconsin co-ops look ahead, p. 52

Wisconsin co-op balance sheet, p. 53

Index, pp. 54-56 ff.


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