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Wisconsin Dairymen's Association / Thirty-second annual report of the Wisconsin Dairymen's Association : held at Platteville, Wis., February 10, 11 and 12, 1904. Report of the proceedings, annual address of the president, and interesting essays and discussions relating to the dairy interests
(1904)

Luchsinger, John
[Remarks],   pp. 89-94 PDF (1.2 MB)


Page 89

 
89 
Wiwconin Dairymen's Association. 
some way of disposing of the factory sewerage in a cheap and 
effective manner. This can easily be done, in anv location where 
the solid rock does not come to the surface, by means of a sep- 
tie tank and filter bed to purify the factory sewage. 
Let us, all together, put our shoulder to the wheel. Let pa- 
tron, maker and proprietor join their efforts for the purpose 
of expelling the causes that contribule the injury to the good 
quality of our cheese, to that end, that our Wisconsin cheese 
will merit the reputation it should have-"The very finest 
cheese in the world." 
DISCUSSION. 
Mr. Luchsinger: I assume that what Mr. Baer has said in 
his statement, would apply not onhv to Southwestern Wiscon- 
S'n, but to factories in every part of the state. 
Mr. Baer: Granted. 
Mr. Luchsinger: It would hardl- be fair for the impres- 
sion to go abroad that all of the defective factories are in South- 
western Wisconsin. I am quite aware that what Mr. Baer has 
said in his paper, is true as regards a great many manufac- 
turers in Southwestern Wisconsin, and perhaps it is as true 
in respect to factories in other parts of Wisconsin. The fact 
is, that until a year or two ago, Southwestern Wisconsin had 
no system of inspection, and 1 think that the inspection of 
factories tends to bring about a cure for these evils that Mr. 
Baer has treated of in his paper. I think that when an in- 
spector is fearless, knows his business, and goes from factory 
to factory and impartially points out the defects in the factory 
and shows the people, both proprietors, cheesemakers and 
patrons wherein they make mistakes, he, and perhaps he alone, 
can cure those evils. The cheesmaker, in a majority of cases, 
is afraid of the proprietor, afraid lie will lose his job, or will 
get the ill will of the patrons. The proprietors do not want 
to invest any more money than they can help in their factor- 
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