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Wisconsin. State Conservation Committee (1915-27) / Biennial report of the State Conservation Commission of Wisconsin for the years 1915 and 1916
(1916)

Extent-value and use of Wisconsin woodlots,   pp. 117-120 PDF (926.9 KB)


Page 117


                       BIENNIAL    REPORT                       117
    EXTENT, VALUE AND USE OF WISCONSIN
                          WOODLOTS.
                       By C. L. HARRINGTON.
  The real importance, extent or possibilities of the farm woodlots in
Wisconsin are but little appreciated by the average citizen of the State.
This perhaps is the chief reason why the average farm woodlot is mis-
managed. A woodlot properly located and cared for is an essential part
of the well-managed farm. It is highly important that this part of the
farm should receive its proper share of attention in order that the benefits
arising from its presence may be realized to their fullest extent. These
benefits are of material importance to every citizen and to the general
prosperity of the State. In brief they are as follows:
                           WOODLOTS.
  1. Produce a valuable crop-fuel wood, poles, posts and timber material.
  2. Beautify the landscape and hence make for more comfortable and
desirable living conditions.
  3. Form wind breaks.
  4. Furnish shade for cattle and horses without being damaged, if prop-
erly managed.
  5. Harbor bird and animal life.
  6. Tend to regulate the rate at which surface water is carried off and
in this respect they are of great importance on steep slopes.
  Any one of these six points is sufficient to warrant the maintenance of
a
woodlot and in the aggregate they furnish a preponderance of evidence
in its favor.
  The extent of the farm woodlots in Wisconsin may be realized from the
following statistics as given by the U. S. census of 1910:
Total land  area  in  W isconsin  .........................................
 35,363,840  acres
Improved land        ........................................ 11,907,606
acres
Unimproved land        .         ....................................9,152,460
acres
W oodland in  farm s................................................................
 5,317,652  acres
  From these figures it can be seen that the woodlots cover an area of
almost five and one-third million acres, or about 15 per cent of the total
land area of the State. Wooded lands on farms, of course, are distinct
from lands that are primarily forested. Thus in Dane county, embracing


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