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Duffus, William M. / Report on agricultural settlement and farm ownership. Part I: state loans to farmers
(1912)

Chapter VI. The need of a system of long-time loans for settlers on the cut-over lands and proposals for the amendment of the county stump--bond law,   pp. 113-129 PDF (4.4 MB)


Page 113


                 STATE LOANS TO FARMERS.                113
                      CHAPTER VI.
THE NEED OF A SYSTEM OF LONG-TIM-E LOANS FOR
  SETTLERS ON THt CUT-OVER LANDS, AND PRO-
  POSALS FOR THE ASMENDMENT OF THE COUNTY
  STUMP-BOND LAW.
  One of the greatest problems now before the people of Wis-
consin and their representatives in the legislature is how to
promote the proper settlement and desirable development of the
so-called "cut-over lands" in the northern part of the state.
Before discussing the problem, however, it may be well to state
a few facts with reference to these lands.
  The cut-over lands are lands which were once covered with
forests. They are called "cut-over" because all or most of the
merchantable timber which stood on them has been cut and re-
moved. Settlers began to farm on the cut-over lands more than
forty years ago, but it is only recently that these lands have
come on the market in a large way as agricultural land. This
is largely because upper Wisconsin has been valued chiefly for
its timber, and because the lumbermen have either been ignor-
ant of the agricultural value of the land or have not cared
to sell land to settlers in small tracts.  They have feared
that the coming in of settlers here and there through their
holdings would mean higher taxes to build the necessary roads
and schools, or that the settlers would start fires which would
spread beyond their own holdings and destroy valuable timber.
Many of the lumber companies have accordingly kept their cut-
over tracts until they had large blocks which they could retail
to individual settlers without fear of fire or heavy taxes, or
which they could dispose of at wholesale to land companies.
Enough settlers went into upper Wisconsin in early days, how-
ever, to prove the existence of valuable farming lands in that
section of the state. During the past fifteen or twenty years set-
tlers in considerable numbers have been taking up these lands,
          8-P. A.


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