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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLII ([covers January 1963/July 1963])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLII, no. 5,   pp. [17]-20 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page [17]


_L~rila 51 9Zr~r
Ml
CROP and
STATE DOCUJ.Aar.J!T
L .t  A -" '<, . H "  Af  -
MADrISON' 2, W'o;-
REPORTER
SAItE UDEIARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                  WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE
Statistical Reporting Service       U     A          Division of Agricultural
Statistics
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
N. L. Brereton
Agricultural Statisticians
C. W. LeGrande             G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge
V ol.N o.B o   351   M adison,. s n  .y   19
Vol. XLII, No. 5        Box 351, Madison, Wisconsin          May, 1963
WEATHER CONDITIONS
throughout the state during April and
May were mostly favorable for field
work while the limited rainfall slowed
the growth of hay and pastures.
Most of the grain acreage in the
state was seeded by May 1. More
than three-fourths of the spring grain
was sown by May 1 in the northern
third of the state where farmers last
year were much behind schedule.
Practically all of the spring grain was
sown by the first of May in the
southern third of the state. For the
state as a whole, 92 percent of the
spring grain was in by May I com-
pared with 68 percent last year and
the usual 77 percent.
Wisconsin Spring Grains Sown
by May'
District        1963  |  1962   | Usual
Percent of total
Northwest .........   82       49        70
North ......     .    82       33        58
Northeast   ........  77        39       54
West .89                       62        79
Central               89        46       77
East                  97       81        78
Southwest             97        78       86
South                 98       90        90
Southeast            100        93       83
State               92       68        77
XAs reported by crop corresp.)ndents.
Farmers are getting some boost in
their spring planting because of the
large acreage plowed for spring plant-
ing last fall. This acreage plus favor-
able plowing conditions early this
spring put field work well ahead of
last year. On May I farmers had
nearly half of their acreage for corn
plowed with less than a third last
year. More than the usual acreage
plowed for corn is reported in the
more important corn producing areas
of the state.
While some hay acreage was winter-
killed in all areas of the state, only
I percent of the alfalfa and 2 percent
of the clover and timothy is estimated
for the state. The largest percentage
as well as the largest acreage of hay
winterkilled is in the southern third
of the state. Acreage losses have been
fairly heavy for clover and timothy in
the southeastern counties.
The condition of new seedings is
good throughout the state for alfalfa,
clover and timothy as well as other
hay. Condition figures reported by
Weather Summary, April 1963
Temperature       Precipitation
Station
Superior   14   75  40   39.5 2.04 2.37  -0.87
Spooner    15   74  46   42.8 2.17 2.11  -1.16
Park Falls 17   72  44   40.6 2.29 2.58  -1.45
R'nlander  18   72  45   41.6 1.36 2.12  -2.70
Medford    18   73  45   41.9 2.18 2.45  -1.74
Marinette  22   78  46   43.5 1.09 2.44  -1.75
Antigo     20   74  45   42.5 1.89 2.45  -1.75
Amery      19  74   47   43.5 2.69 2.19  -0.01
Riv. Falls  24  76   48  44.6 2.26 2.42  -1.13
La Crosse  27   78  49   47.0 2.46 2.75  -1.19
Hatfield
Dam      17   79  47   44.4 2.26 2.64 +0.30
M'rs'field  19  77   45  43.1 2.31 2.71  -2.05
Hancock    17   76  48   44.5 2.17 2.63 + 0.03
Oshkosh    19   79  46   44.6 2.52 2.61  -0.10
Gr. Bay    22   80  48   42.7 0.98 2.46  -1.20
Portage    25   81  51   47.6 1.68 2.90  -1.98
S'boygan   25   78  46   43.6 1.91 2.49  -2.35
Mn'towoc 23     78  44   43.6 1.41 2.67  -2.58
Lancaster  25   78   49  47.3 1.75 2.83  -2.22
D'rlingt'n  21  80   50  47.2 2.23 2.93  -1.96
Hillsboro  22   81   48  45.7 1.95 2.83  -1.36
Madison    20   80  48   44.4 1.67 2.57  -1.79
Beloit     26   79  52   49.1 3.24 2.68  -1.91
Lake
Geneva   21   75  48   47.5 3.52 3.24  *1.55
Milwa 'kee
(airport)  25  82   46  43.6 2.54 2.53   -2.23
Av. for 25
stations   20.8 77.2 46.8 44.3 2.10 2.58  -1.47
Wisconsin farmers on May I averaged
95 percent of normal for alfalfa and
94 percent for clover and timothy.
The condition of all tame hay on
May 1 was 92 percent of normal
compared with 94 percent for the
state last year and the average of
88 percent. Pasture conditions aver-
aged 90 percent of normal for May
I compared with the average of 85
percent.
Condition of New Seedings on May I in Wisconsin'
1963                                1962
DistricAlflfa             Clover and     Other                Clover and
    Other
District___________ _  Alfalfa   timothy     tame hay     Alfalfa    t.imothy
   tame hay
Percent of normal
Northwest     ,     .............  96          97          98          90
         91           91
North                              94          95          96          92
         93           93
Northeast           ...................  93    92          91          95
         93           91
West .9,.                 ......   95          95          94          93
         94           91
Central ..          .............  98          94          99          95
         94           96
East .......            .......   94           90          94          95
         92          91
Southwest ......                  96           93           94         94
         88           90
South .     ................       94          92          95          95
         93           94
Southeast.                         90          91          95          94
         93
State .9................ .......  95        94          96          94  
   it
\ 3 k3 V, Tj4
tEGIS~       Ii4
iAs reporrted by crop cotrespondents.
E
X iUN
IN THIS ISSUE
May Crop Report
Field w o r k progressed
well during April in Wis-
consin. Spring grain plant-
ing was ahead of a year
earlier and plowing of corn
land was also ahead of
schedule. Hay lands came
through the winter in gen-
erally good shape.
Milk Production
April milk output in Wis-
consin was a little above
the same month last year.
So far this year production
is 1 percent under last year.
Egg Production
Wisconsin April egg out-
put was 9 percent below a
year earlier. Layer numbers
were off sharply while rate
of lay was up a little.
Prices Farmers Receive & Pay
The index of prices re-
ceived by Wisconsin farm-
ers in April was the lowest
for the month since 1957,
while the index of prices
paid was the highest re-
corded for the month.
Agricultural Price Trends Chart
Features
.6
I
L. E. Kr-h-
1,11U.11 Uiree-tourths of the spring gram
was sown by May 1 in the northern
third of the state where farmers last
year were much behind schedule.
Practically all of the spring grain was
sown by the first of May in the
southern third of the state. For the
state as a whole, 92 percent of the
spring grain was in by May I com-
pared with 68 percent last year and
the usual 77 percent.


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