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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLII ([covers January 1963/July 1963])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLII, no. 3,   pp. [9]-12 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page [9]


- L..r1ri   511-m
REPORTER
ISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Division of Agricultural Statistics
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
Agricultural Statisticians
C. W. LeGrande,            G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
V. C. Struck,
C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge
Vol. XLII, No. 3                Box 351, Madison, Wisconsin             
       March, 1963
IN THIS ISSUE
Farm Numbers
Wisconsin farm numbers
at 133,000 in 1962 dropped
almost a fourth since 1950,
but the average size rose
over a fifth. Farms aver-
aged 165 acres in size last
year. Land in farms declined
7 percent since mid-cen-
tury.
Milk Production
February milk production
in Wisconsin totaled 2 per-
cent under the same month
last year. It was 2 percent
above the average for the
month.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wis-
consin farms for February
was 9 percent under a year
ago. This reflects both a
lower rate of lay and a rec-
ord low in layers for the
month.
IMPORTANT CHANGES have tak-
en place in Wisconsin farms since
mid-century. Farm numbers dropped
nearly a fourth. The average size of
farm is now over a fifth larger than
in 1950. During the same period land
in farms decreased 7 percent.
The state had 133,000 farms in
1962 or 41,000 farms less than in
1950. There were 155.000 and 138,000
farms in 1955 and 1960 respectively.
Farm numbers have fallen off each
year since 1950 but have risen sub-
stantially in size. The 1962 average
size was 165 acres. This is 29 acres
greater than the 1950 average. The
1955 average was 150 acres.
The shift to fewer and larger farms
is a reflection of consolidation of
farm tracts. To some extent farms are
fewer in number by change of defi-
nition. That is, earlier definitions
considered some very small agricul-
tural operations as farms-present
definitions rule them out. Larger
farms generally mean more economi-
cal operation in lowered costs per unit
produced. Also, with extensive mech-
anization of farming it is more advan-
tageous to have larger farms.
Land in Wisconsin farms dropped
1.6 million acres since 1950. The 1962
total was 22 million acres. Declines
occurred in most years since 1950.
Urbanization with its housing, shop-
ping, and industrial developments is
an important factor in declining farm
land acreage. Highway building is
likewise taking land out of farm use.
Weather Summary, February, 1963
Temperature       Precipitation
Station                                  la ".
Superior *27   40    9   15.1 1.48 0.80  -0.23
Spooner   -28  38   10   14.7 0.39 0.64  -0.76
Park Falls -26  34   7   14.2 0.49 0.97  -1.16
R'nlander -30  35    9   14.7 0.46 1.10  .1.54
Medford   -28  37    9   15.2 0.51 1.07  -1.18
Marinette -16  39   12   21.4 0.89 1.19  -1.09
Antigo    -20  37   11   17.3 0.46 0.92  -1.36
Amery     .25  40   11   14.7 0.36 0.77  -0.76
Riv. Falls -16  41  14   16.3 0.61 0.82  -0.57
La Crosse -15  40   15   19.4 0.49 1.05  -1.08
Hatfield
Dam     *24  42   13   17.6 0.43 0.80  -0.61
M' rs'field -23  37  11  16.6 0.46 0.99  -1.43
Hancock   -28  40   12   18.1 0.53 0.95  -1.08
Oshkosh   -17  35   13  20.1 0.64 1.17  -1.20
Gr. Bay   -15  39   11   17.6 0.59 1.08  -0.96
Portage   -16  43   16  22.4 0.87 1.18  -1.07
S boyan   -12  40   18   22.5 0.84 1.51  -1.58
Mn towoc-14    39   14   23.1 0.71 1.43  -1.67
Lancaster -13  44   15   22.3 0.27 1.06  -1.48
D'rlingtn -20  43   17   23.1 0.50 1.03  -1.40
Hillsboro -24  43   12  20.4 0.92 1.09  -0.90
Madison   -14  40   14  20.0 0.39 1.13  -1.38
Beliot    -10  43   18  25.3 0.46 1.25  .1.90
Lake
Geneva -12   45   18   24.8 0.69 1.26  *1.37
Milw'kee
(airport) -12  42  16   22.4 0.42 1.40  -2.15
Av. for 25
stations  -19.4 39.8 13.0 19.2 0.59 1.07  -1.20
The nation, like this state, has ex-
perienced a downward trend in farm
numbers, dropping 35 percent since
1950. Land in farms declined only 3
111
Prices Farmers Receive & Pay
The February index of
prices received by Wiscon-
sin farmers was 4 percent
below February 1962. The
index of prices paid was a
record high for the month.
Agricultural Price Trends Chart
Features
Cash Receipts From
Farm Marketings
Prices Farmers Receive
Reported by Years
CROP
DEPARTMENT
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