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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 9,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [1]


STATE DOC-IMEN I'
WIS. LEG. REF. LIBRARt
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE  WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics    Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
Walter H. Ebling,
C. D. Caparoon,
Agelculturial Statlutlelanx
Emery C. Wilcox
Vol. XXIX, No. 9             State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin          
 September 1950
IN THIS ISSUE
September Crop Report
August w e a t h e r conditions
caused mixed trends in Wiscon-
sin's crop prospects. The second
crop of hay benefited by the cool
weather, and hay production
prospects increased during the
month. Grain harvesting was
done under favorable conditions.
Crops such as oats and barley
made better yields than ex-
pected earlier. The corn crop,
however, developed slowly dur-
ing the past month, and the
probable production has declined
since August 1. Most crops to
be harvested in September and
October are in more than usual
danger of frost this year.
Milk Production
Milk production on Wiscon-
sin farms in August was only
slightly h i g h e r than August
1949, and the total production
for the first 8 months this year
was a little under the same pe-
riod last year. The nation's milk
production in August showed
little gain over a year earlier.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wisconsin
farms in August was 5 percent
above August last year and
nearly 3 percent higher than the
5-year average for the month.
The nation's farm flocks pro-
duced over 9 percent more eggs
in August than a year earlier.
Prices Farmers Receive and
Pay
Prices received for products
sold by Wisconsin farmers have
been increasing since mid-April
but in August the purchasing
power of the farm dollar in
terms of p r i c e s received to
prices paid remained the same
as a year earlier.
Current Trends
The demand for farm prod-
ucts for the rest of the year is
expected to be good with the
rapidly increasing volume of
consumer dollars. Civilian em-
ployment is the highest on rec-
ord and rising with the increas-
ing industrial production.
Special News Items (page 4)
Record Turkey Crop
Record Potato Yields
Cranberry Production
CROP progress in Wisconsin during
much of August and early Septem-
ber was slow. The weather was cooler
than normal and some parts of the
state were dry. Actually, this period
was favorable for the harvesting and
threshing of grain and such crops as
oats and barley have turned out bet-
ter than seemed likely early in the
season. Barley in Wisconsin is mak-
ing a new record yield of 42 bushels
per acre and oats is averaging 47.5
bushels which compares with the aver-
age yield of 41 bushels last year.
Second crops of hay also benefited
from the cool weather, as a result
Wisconsin's tame hay crop is about
14 percent larger than last year. Be-
cause of cool weather and some rains
drying of late hay was difficult on
many farms and some damage to the
quality of hay is reported.
Corn has developed slowly during
the past month. In many counties it
is now two weeks or more late, and
as a result the prospects of the crop
are uncertain because of the danger
from early frost. Already frost has
occurred in a number of northern and
central counties, but so far the dam-
age has been limited to areas where
corn is used mostly for silage. The
counties which have large production
of corn for grain escaped the August
frosts.
Other Wisconsin crops have varying
yield prospects. Potato production will
be large. Yields appear to be the high-
est on record for the state. The sweet
corn crop on the other hand is making
low yields. Reports so far indicate
that sweet corn yields generally have
been disappointing. Commercial apple
production varies greatly in different
parts of the state. There seems to be
a good crop in Door County and in
some of the eastern Wisconsin coun-
ties. In the remainder of the state the
crop is generally light.
United States Crops
The country as a whole has had
little change in crop prospects during
the past month. The corn crop has
about held its own in most parts of
the country, but it is generally late
and it is the big unknown in the feed
situation. Supplies of other grains and
hay are relatively good this year,
even wheat production is larger now
than estimated earlier. September es-
timates place the nation's corn crop
at 3,1621/2 million bushels.
The present estimate of feed grain
production for t h e United States
places it at 125 million tons which
compares with 138 million tons pro-
duced in the record year of 1948. How-
ever, there is a carryover of about 15
million tons which will bring the na-
tional supply close to last year's level.
The hay crop of the nation is a large
Weather Summary, August 1950
Station
Duluth---
Sposonr --
Park Falls_
Rhinelander
Wausau-
Marinette -
Escanaba_
Minneapolis
Eau Claire.
La Crosse-
Hancock ---
Oshkosh --
Green Bay-
Manitowoc.
Dubuque
Madison--.
Beloit
Milwaukee
Average Isa
18 Station,
Temperature
Degrees Fahrenheit
E
a
33
29
40
33
2
36
34
40
40
40
42
33
39
238
42
45
45
43
44
39.1
87
96
88
91
89
79
96
93
91
93
91
87
85
91
88
90
89
89.4
S
59.2
63.2
58.6
60.5
64.7
64.2
S9.0
67.7
67.1
66.9
64.4
65.3
61.7
64.3
69.6
66.2
68.3
65.4
64.2
e
z
62.0
66.1
63.4
64.6
66.6
68.3
64.3
69.1
69.1
70.a
68.4
68.1
67.1
66.4
71.1
69.1
70.1
67.4
67A
Precipitation
inches
-e -
2.28 3.18 +2.78
.96 3.50 +0.68
2.91 4.21 +0.24
3.07 4.15 +1.24
2.92 3.52 ---
2.77 3.02 -1.08
1.94 3.19 -0.15
1.84 3.12 -4.15
3.17 3.68  1.28
1.96 3.71 +4.40
2.62 3.41 +0.87
1.48 3.04 -1.57
2.72 3.18 +2.15
2.53 2.90 -1.11
1.08 3.24 +3.16
3.40 3.21 +11.05
3.85 3.31
3.29 2.66 +6.96
2 48 3 35 41 451
tAverag: for 16 Stations.
one, nearly 8 percent larger than a
year ago, hence hay is expected to be
in good supply.
In spite of uncertain corn prospects
it is believed that feed supplies in the
United States are adequate for the
livestock population. The hay crop is
larger than last year and there is a
considerable carryover of grain from
1949 crops.
Fruit crops have improved during
the past month and the potato crop
is larger than was expected earlier.
Potato yields this year are generally
high due to cool weather and plenty
of moisture. A crop of 420 million
bushels is now in prospect.
Milk Production
Milk production on Wisconsin farms
in August was estimated at 1,346 mil-
lion pounds, which was an increase of
less than 1 percent over August last
year and 9 percent above the 10-year
average production for the month.
Total milk production for the 8
months of this year was 11,406 mil-
lion pounds or nearly equal to the
1949 production for the corresponding
period.
Although pasture conditions in the
nation have averaged much above last
summer and August was an unusually
cool month, milk production was only
slightly above August of last year for
the nation as a whole. A little over
101/2 billion pounds of milk were pro-
duced in the United States in August,
which was 2 percent above the 10-year
average for the month.
lI


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