University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 7,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page [1]


WIS LEG. REF. LIBRARY
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE   WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics        Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
Walter H. Ebling,
C. D. Caparoon,                 Emery C. Wilcox,
Awreteultural Stattltlelans
Cecil W. Estes
Vol. XXIX, No. 7             State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin          
     July 1950
IN THIS ISSUE
July Crop Report
Widespread improvement in
Wisconsin crop conditions oc-
curred during June, and the
state is expected to have an-
other good crop year. Acreage
changes have been small this
year because tame hay and grain
crops wintered well in most
counties. Crop prospects for the
nation are below last year with
acreage shifts reducing crop
production from 1949.
Stocks of Grain on Farms
Wisconsin farmers have more
corn and less oats on hand than
a year ago. For the nation farm
stocks of corn, oats, wheat, and
soybeans are smaller than in
July last year.
Milk Production
June milk production on Wis-
consin farms was slightly lower
than June last year, but an in-
crease over last year of 2 per-
cent is shown for the nation.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wisconsin
farms during June was a little
higher than in June last year
but between 4 and 5 percent be-
low the 5-year average for the
month. Farm flocks in the na-
tion produced 5 percent more
eggs than in June 1949, but the
June production was below av-
erage.
Prices Farmers Receive
and Pay
Wisconsin farm product prices
in June averaged slightly lower
than June 1949. Lower prices
for milk and poultry and eggs
more than offset increased
prices for meat animals.
Current Trends
Wholesale prices averaged
above the June 1949 level, and
the June retail price index was
about equal to that of a year
ago. More hogs and sheep and
lambs were slaughtered in June
than a year ago but cattle and
calf slaughter was lower. Stocks
of dried, condensed, and evapo-
rated milk products are lower
than a year ago but cold stor-
age holdings of butter and
cheese are much larger.
Special News Item (page 4)
Spring Pig Crop and
Prospects for Fall
IN spite of a slow start, Wisconsin's
crop season is working out better
than expected earlier. During the
past month widespread improvement
has occurred. Rains in southern Wis-
consin were ample while in parts of
northern and eastern Wisconsin there
was less moisture. However, rains
were well spaced and crops including
hay and pastures have improved.
Wisconsin's hay crop is expected to
be about 7 percent larger than a year
ago with little change in acreage.
Pastures on July 1 were better than a
month earlier or a year ago.
Acreage changes in Wisconsin are
small this year because hay crops and
grain wintered well in most counties.
In east-central Wisconsin some losses
of hay acreage are reported and the
condition of hay and pastures in that
section has been lower than elsewhere
in the state. Less acreage of corn,
oats, wheat, potatoes, and flax is
being grown in the state this year
than last vear, but there are increases
in barley, tobacco, rye, hay, and some
of the truck and canning crops.
The United States has some rather
large acreage changes this year partly
because of government program:;.
There will be 4 percent less corn, 22
percent less winter wheat, 17 percent
less spring wheat, and 23 percent less
flax. Increases in crop acreages are
shown nationally for oats, barley, hay.
and rye. With the unusually large
acreage adjustments which are taking
place, the crop acreage in the nation
is down 13 million acres from last
year and with the exception of 1946
it is the smallest since 1942.
On the whole the country has crop
prospects below last year. The shift
from corn, wheat, and cotton to other
crops is reducing total output. Also,
Weather Summary, June 1950
Station
Duluth=
Spooner -
Park Falls
Rhinelander
Wausau-
Marinette
Escanah   -
Minneapoli,
Eau Claire
La Crosse-
Hancock --
Oshkosh
Green Bay
Manitowoc
Dubuque
Madison --
Beloit
Milwaukee
Average for
18 Stations
Temperature
Degrees Fahrenheit
B
38
33
34
37
38
36
38
41
41
46
38
38
38
43
45
46
43
45
39.9
S
82
90
93
81
94
95
89
90
90
881
90
88
90
87
89. 6
I Average for 17 stations.
'Average for 16 stations.
57.8
61.'
62.3
66.6
64.3
59.4
67.
68.
65.6
6f. 6
64.3
65.C
68.4
66.1
69.
65.6
65.2
A
I
57.2
54.1
l2.8
12.1
64.7
86. !
60.
87.1!
66.6f
66. :i
66. ~
66.1
62. 1
69.4
67.2
68A.
62.1
64.9
Precipitation
inches
S
3.13
Z.42
5.24
2.32
2.23
1.13
1.26
Z.11
4.88
3.60
2.55
3.11
2.19
7.59
7.15
7.55
5.11
3.741
I
3.91
3.94
4.88
4.68
4.15
3.16
3.22
6.22
4.72
4.07
4.47
3.94
3.70
3.30
4.31
3.76
4.05
3.46
3.99
o la
* ,,
+3.96
+2.98
+2.04
1- .61
-0.77
2.88
2.92
+3.98
1. 12
-2.49
0.43
2.26
+4.57
+4.33
+2.09
+0. 702
the crops over wide areas were off to
a slow start this spring, but recently
there has been a good deal of im-
provement. Production as a whole is
now expected to be above average for
the United States in 1950.
Milk Production
A total of 1,721 million pounds of
milk was produced on Wisconsin
farms in June-almost twice as much
as in Minnesota the second largest
producer. However, the production in
*IRI.ICA tS CURRENT SUPPLY OF PASTURE PEED FOR GRAZING RELATIVE TO THAT EXPECTED
ROM EXISTING STANDS UNDER VERY FAVORABLE WEATHER CONDITIONS
DASTIUDR FED rCONITIOiNS*
l
l
P_


Go up to Top of Page