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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XXIX ([covers January 1950/December 1950])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XXIX, no. 6,   pp. [1]-4 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [1]


51,,; _
WISCONSIN               WI.S. LEG. REF. LIBRARY
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
C. D. Caparoon.            Emery C. Wilcox,
Cecil W. Estes
Agricultural Statistlelans
Vol. XXIX, No. 6                State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin       
             June 1950
IN THIS ISSUE
June Crop Report
Prospects for Wisconsin and
United States crop production
improved during May. June 1
reports, however, showed that
crop prospects for the state and
nation were rather uncertain
because of the slowness with
which the crop season started.
Milk Production
Milk production on Wisconsin
farms as well as for the nation
was lower in May this year
Man a year ago. FrOeUuLtuct per
cow failed to make the usual
seasonal increase from April to
Mlay, and the peak in milk pro-
duction may occur later this
year.
Egg Production
Egg production on Wisconsin
farms in May was slightly be-
low a year ago, but for the
nation egg production was 5
percent above last year. There
are fewer young chickens and
chicks on farms in both the
slate and nation than there were
a year ago.
Prices Farmers Receive and
Pay
The general level of pt-ices
received by Wisconsiti farmers
increased from  April to May,
but the May index was still be-
low  a year earlier. Hog and
milk prices in May averaged
about the same as a year ago,
and beef cattle prices are a
little higher this year.
Current Trends
Cold-storage holdings of but-
ter, cheese, frozen poultry. and
eggs are all larger than a year
ago, and with the exception of
frozen poultry show increases
from May to June. Stocks of
dried, condensed, evaporated,
and powdered milk products are
all smaller than a year ago.
Special Items (pages 3 and 4)
Dairy Manutfactutlers-194¶i
Hay Acreage Losses
Corn Planting Late
SOME IMPROVEMENT in Wiscon-
sin's crop prospects occurred from
the first of May to the beginning of
June, according to reports from the
state's crop correspondents. However,
crop condition in Wisconsin and for
the nation as a whole are generally
well below the conditions reported on
June 1 last year and they are also
under average for some crops.
In this and other northern states,
crops were planted late and unde-
unfavorable weather conditions this
yea-. Wisconsin farmers were about
three weeks behind in planting small
grains, and the corn crop was planted
a week or more later than usual.
Rainfall was spotty throughout the
state ill May, and farmers in some
areas reported the soil too dry for
good germination. Temperatures were
also low for this time of year, which
also retarded the growth of vegetation.
Probable production of small grains
varies, but these crops made progress
during the latter part of May and
eaily June. Although the oat crop
was planted unusually late, the June I
condition indicated a crop only a little
smaller than the one harvested last
veal and well above average. Barley
production is expected to be larger
than last year because of the larger
acreage planted. Spring and winter
wheat and rye crops in the state prob-
ablv will be smaller than last year
and the 10-year average.
(Conditions of Crops, June 1, 1950
1Q49, and 10-year Average
(Percent of normal)
Wisconsin        United States U
Crop                 10-yr             | 10-yr.
TV.
1950  1949  1948   19    1949  1939-
Winter wheat  81    87    86     -
Spring wheat  87    91    90    78     84    84
Oats          86    92    89    79    87     81
Bar'ey        $6    90    99    78     84    81
Rye           86    88    86
All hay       75    80    86    82    86     83
Clover and
timothy hay  75   76     85    82    84    84
Alfalfa ha,   74    90    88    82    90     85
Wild hay      86    86    86    80     85    80
Pasture      75     82    85    83    88     83
Cherry    production     in  Wisconsin     is
now    forecast at 16,200       tons.   If this
forecast materializes the crop will be
40 percent larger than the small 1949
crop and 30 percent above average.
Last year the late frost damaged the
crop and greatly reduced production.
United States Crops
Crop production for the nation in
1950 is expected to be well below that
of recent years. More than the usual
acreage of cropland will remain idle
this year. Acreages of important
Weather Summ-cry, slay 1950)
Station
Duluth
Spooner-.
Park Falls_
Rhinelander
Wausau -
Marinette
Escanaba-.
Minneapolis
Eas, Claire
La Cr.,sse
Hancock
Oshkosh-
Green Bay
Manitowoc
Dubuque.
Madison
Beloit .
Milwaukee
Average for
18 Stations
' Av, raVe I
Te
Degre,
I
i
E
28
24
25
24
30
26
29
30
30
33
26
. S
32
33
34
34
33
28.9
mperature        Precipitation
es Fahrenheit       inches
I        __        -_
.1 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4
72   45.8147.3 6.00 3.25 4-4.74
89   52.0 54.7 4.51 3.19 +4. 50
85   50 552.5 2.68 3.50 +1.26
83   51.2 52.7 3.60 3.18 +4.40
88   56.2 55.2 2.28 3.44 +2.69
80   52.2 55. 1 1.90 3.12 -0.68
70   49.0 49.6 1.67 2.93 +1.32
87   56. I57.7 2.87 3.67 +0.08
90   56.8 57.4 2.61 4.04 -0.21
85   59.0 59. 3 4.28 3.75 +3.17
92   56, 1 56.4 2.60 4.11 -0.25
92   56.0 56.4 1.37 3.52 --L.10
87   53.0 54.9 11.50 13.S2 +0.16
81   53.1 52.2 1.26 3.49   1 15
88   60.8 60.3 3.99 4.22 +1.29
89   58.0 57. 6 3.25 3.85 +0.94
9 2  60.6 58.5  .   3 54
90   53.7 52.6 2.04 3.35   0.38
85.6 54.4 55.0' 2.85' 3.540 1 22-
__             El    | s.
ror 17 stI
(rops have been reduced by diversion
to fallow, pasture, new meadows, and
less productive crops. In addition to
the reduced acreage, progl-ess of the
growing season is still r-eta-ded al-
though significant recovely occurred
dturing May.
June I reports show that since the
beginning of Mlay spriing-soxn grains
in most areas made good progress
although seeding was later than usual.
Corn and soybeans progressed rapidly
during the latter part of May and the
development of these crops is about
normal. Winter wheat prospects im-
proved slightly with favoi-able con-
ditions  in  most areas.  Favorable
weather in late May ani early June
tended to correct deficiencies of sun-
shine or rain, as the case might be,
in most of the country.
Milk Production
Milk production on Wisconsin farms
during May was between 4 and 5 per-
cent below the record May milk pro-
duction of last year. The peak in milk
production occurred in May last year
while it usually is in June. With
1,725.000,000 pounds of milk produced
on Wisconsin farms last month, the
May production was only slightly be-
low May 1948 and it was more than
6 percent above the 10-year average
for the month.
United States Milk Production
Milk production on farms in the
nation in May was about I percent
.
Walter H. Ehling.


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