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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XIV ([covers January 1935/December 1935])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XIV, no. 2,   pp. [5]-8 PDF (2.2 MB)


Page [5]


STATE DOUljMtN1
WIS. LEG. REF. LIBRARY
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE              WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Bureau of Agricultural Economics                           Division of Agricultural
Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
S. J. GILBERT, Assistant Agricultural Statistician                   W. D.
BORMUTH, Junior Statistician
State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin
C OMPARED with other years Wiscon-
sin's livestock survey this year shows
some very unusual changes. The state's
cattle and hog populations showed the
sharpest decline from a year ago that has
ever been recorded for these species in
the history of the state. Horses, on the
other hand, show  the first increase in
numbers in about twenty years.    The
state's sheep population shows a small in-
crease, but it is not greatly different from
what it has been during the past few
years.
Values of the state's livestock, on the
other hand, show a general increase. Ev-
en with a marked decline in cattle and
hogs, both of these species show a much
higher inventory value than they had a
year ago. With a decline of 6 percent in
our cattle numbers we have an increase of
nearly 13 percent in value, and with a de-
cline of 24 percent in hog numbers we
have an increase in value of nearly 31
percent.
The value per head of cattle increased
nearly 20 percent, as compared with a
year ago, horses nearly 10 percent hogs
nearly 73 percent, and sheep over 23 per-
cent.  The aggregate farm  value of the
state's livestock at the beginning of the
present year was estimated at about
$146,000,000, an increase of 13.5 percent
over a year ago.
Cattle Numbers Reduced 194,000
The state's cattle herd at the beginning
of the present year was estimated at
3,036,000 head, which is 194,000 head less
than a year ago. No decrease of such size
has been previously recorded in the state's
history. The number of milk cows on the
state's farms at the beginning of the pres-
ent year is estimated At 2.124,000 head,
which is a decline of 4 percent from a
year ago. The decreases have come more
largely in the young stock, there being a
marked decline in the number of calves
and heifers in the herds, as well as a de-
crlne in the number of beef animals on
farms. Because they yield current income
milk cows have been kept in many cases
where it was necessary to dispose of other
cattle in order to bring the herd down to
a size where it could be maintained on the
feed supply available.
The decrease in swine numbers is the
most spectacular so far recorded in the
history of the state, the decline from a
year ago being 24 percent, which reduces
the number of hogs on the state's farms
to 1,151,000, a decrease of 363,000 head
from a year ago. The number of brood
sows intended for farrowing this spring
shows a decline of about 20 percent. The
declines are largely in the number of
Young pigs under six months of age be-
cause of the small pig crop of last fall.
The value per head of the state's hogs
gained over 70 percent from a year ago.
Farm Horses Increase
For the first time in about twenty years
the farm horses in Wisconsin show an in-
crease in population. The number of
horses on the state's farms now is esti-
mated at 516,000 head, or about 9,000 head
more than last year. For the past two
years there has been an increase In the
number of colts on farms, the increase
being quite apparent during the past year.
There were also shipped into the state
during the past year over 20,000 head of
work horses.
NUMBER AND VALUE OF LIVESTOCK
February, 1935
While the number of old work horses
has not increased from a year ago there
is a substantial increase in the number of
colts, which is sufficient to bring up the
state's horse population above that of a
year ago. The horse population in Wis-
consin began to decline with the large-
scale introduction of automobiles and trac-
tors about 1915, and the decline has con-
tinued steadily from that time until this
year. Horse prices have shown strength
for several years. They are now about 10
percent higher than they were a year ago,
ON JANUARY 1. 1935, 1934, and 1933
WISCONSIN
Class of Livestock
Cows and heifers 2 year
old and over kept fo
milk ..............
Heifers I to 2 years ol
kept for milk cows...
Heier calves being savo
for milk cows.......
All other calves .....
Cows and heifers 2 year
old and over not fo
milk ...............
Heifers Ito2yearsoldno
for milk............
Steers I year and over.
Buils one year and over.
All Cattle...........
Horses .............
Mules ...............
Sows and gilts........
Other hogs over 6 montlu
Pigs under 6 months ..
All Swine...........
Ewes I year and over. .
Ewe lambs for breeding
Wether and rum lambs.
Rams and wethers I yeal
and over...........
Sheep and lambs on feed
All Sheep .. .   ..L..
TOTAL FIVE
SPECIES   .....
Number
(000 omitted)
1935
(Prelim
inary)
2,124
3bt0
'140:
349
46
20
15
30
017
3,036
516
7
230
460
461
1,151
256
80
4
15
81
466
1934
(Re-
vised)
2,212
387
392
57
25
1 7
40
100
3,230
507
7
288
511
715
1,514
278
73
3
15
85
452
1933
(Re-
vised)
2.175
2sfr'
400
53
23
16
36
100
3,198
512
7
355
610
746
1,611
?"0
71
3
15
85
464
Farm Price'
per head
1935
(Prelim
inary)
Dollars
33.00
...I...
I. .
.....
27.40
100.00
101.00
.. ...I
7.60
. . .
4.20
1934
(Re-
vised)
Dollars
28 00
.. . ..
. I  ..
22.90
91.00
89.00
.....
4.40
3.40
1933
(Re-
vised)
Dallars
1) 00
... .
... ..
24.20
77.00
74.00
.   .   .. .
4.20
2.50
Farm Value
(000 omitted)
1935
(Prelim-
inary)
Dollars
'70,002
83,293
51,361
707
8 744
1,934
146,039
1934
(Re-
vised)
Dollars
281,936
73,836
45,966
623
6,686
1,536
128,647
1933
(Re-
vised)
Dollars
2865,250
.   .I  ..
77,537
39,599
518
6,825
1,174
125,653
UNITED STATES
Cows and heifers 2 years
old and over kept for
milk..    ..........
Heifers I to 2 years old
kept for milk cows ....
All other cattle........
All Cattle .........
Horses ...............
Mules ..        ....
Swine including pigs ..
Sheep and lambs .....
TOTAL FIVE
SPECIES .......
25,100
4,286
31.281
60,667
11,827
4,795
37,007
49,766
26,185
4,788
37,317
68,290
11,963
4,925
57,177
52,212
25,285
4,703
315,716;
65,704
12,203
5,036
61,598
51,762
M.1138
21.07
76.18
98.21
6.41
4.31
27,11
1. ...I
18.27
66.30
81.54
4.14
3.79
.   ..   .  ..
209,2
19.94
53.75
60.18
4.22
2.90
2762,543
1,278,327
901,038
470,900
237,258
214,613
3,102,136
270(1(09
1,247,491
793,155
401,596
236,862
197,740
2,876,844
1,310,164
655,911
303,066
259,827
150,097
2,679,065
'Farm price per bead of all cattle, horses, mules, swine, and sheep derived
by lij idijng total value by total number.
Total value represents sum  of values by age groups.
2included in value of all cattle.
Vol. XIV, No. 2
IN THIS ISSUE
I935 Livestock Inventory
Milk Production Trends
Egg Production
Wages of Farm Labor Higher
Prices of Farm Products
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