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The State of Wisconsin Collection

Browse subcollection Wisconsin Pioneer Experience

48 matches.


Alvstad, Ingeborg Holdahl, 1884-1989 Reminiscences, undated [Transcriptions]: Call Number, River Falls SC 245 ([unpublished])

Ingeborg Holdahl Alvstad, Reminiscences, undated (RIVER FALLS) - Recollections by Alvstad of her family's emigration from Norway, the sinking of their ship, their settlement in Gilman Township, Pierce County, Wisconsin, in 1889, and her early years there as her family established a farm home. 9 typed, transcribed pages.

Archiquette, John Diary, 1868-1874 [Translations]: Call Number, Green Bay SC 53 ([unpublished])

John Archiquette, Diary 1868-1874 (GREEN BAY) - Typed translation of a diary kept by Archiquette, an Oneida Indian, containing information on tribal council decisions and discipline and on farming, road building, religious services, and other aspects of life on the Oneida Reservation near Green Bay, Wisconsin. Translated from the Oneida language by Oscar H. Archiquette. 34 pages of typed transcriptions from the original Oneida.

Bondal, Gunleik Asmundson Letter, 1854 [Translations]: Call Number, M94-396 ([unpublished])

Gunleik Asmundson Bondal, Letter, 1854. (WHS) - Translation of a letter written by Gunleik Asmundson Bondal, a Norwegian immigrant, on January 17, 1854, describing his journey from Krago, Norway, to Dane County, Wisconsin and his family's new life in America. He recounts the price of cattle, farm implements, food, clothing, and other necessities, and writes of farming, including descriptions of the machines used, wages, the time taken by various tasks, geography, and climate. He draws many comparisons between the New World and the Old. Also mentioned is the California gold rush and cholera epidemic. 7 typed translations from the original Norwegian. Uncorrected OCRd transcriptions of some letters available.

Brainerd, Mary Pease, 1811- Letters, 1875-1882: Call Number, Oshkosh SC 68 ([unpublished])

Four letters written by Mary ("Molly") Brainerd from rural Danville, Dodge County, Wis. to relatives in Michigan. The two earlier letters are addressed to her niece, Lavinia, a student in Kalamazoo, Mich. and are filled with family news and detailed information about crop conditions. The 1881 letter tells of a very hard winter with deep snow and its attendant difficulties, and of a lot of sickness and death. The 1882 letter describes the provisioning of family members who left for the minefields of Montana. Uncorrected OCRd transcription available.

Brandt, Gerard Letters, 1850-1860 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Milwaukee Small Collection 47 Box 1 ([unpublished])

Selections from Gerard Brandt, Letters 1850-1860 (MILWAUKEE) - Selection from the letters from Gerard and Catherine Brandt of Holland township in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, to relatives and friends, chiefly in Milwaukee and the Netherlands, about personal and religious matters and life in Wisconsin. 35 pages of typed translations from the original Dutch.

Chase, Enoch Reminiscences, 1876: Call Number, Wis MSS DL Milwaukee SC 32 ([unpublished])

Reminiscences of a pioneer settler in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who left his home in Vermont in 1831, traveled by schooner and stage to Coldwater, Michigan, where he practiced medicine and taught school. In April, 1835, he drove a team to Milwaukee. In his narrative he describes and characterizes many of the pioneer men and women of Milwaukee, and speaks of Indian troubles, the organization of government, the development of industries, and local rivalries. A portion of the sketch is published in James S. Buck's Pioneer History of Milwaukee, 1:49-52 (Milwaukee, 1890).

Currey, J. Seymour Vilas County notes, 1906: Call Number, Northland SC 28 ([unpublished])

J. Seymour Currey, Vilas County Notes, 1906 (WHS) - Notes by Currey on the lakes of Vilas County, Wisconsin, including information on Charles A. Bent and his family, owners of a resort on Lake Mamie. 11 handwritten pages.

Dinsdale, Matthew Papers, 1836-1897: Call Number, WisMSS DL, folder 1 ([unpublished])

Selection of letters by Rev. Dinsdale written from Linden and other Wisconsin settlements to his relatives in Askrigg, Yorkshire, England, describing his trip to the United States in 1844 and giving minute advice to prospective immigrants; his pastoral services as a Methodist minister at Potosi, Wisconsin, and in the Lake Winnebago circuit; economic conditions as seen through his work as a clerk in stores at Linden and elsewhere. Some letters from the original collection have been omitted due to illegibility.

Dinsdale, Matthew Papers, 1836-1897: Call Number, Wis MSS DL, folder 2 ([unpublished])

Selection of letters by Rev. Dinsdale written from Linden and other Wisconsin settlements to his relatives in Askrigg, Yorkshire, England, describing his trip to the United States in 1844 and giving minute advice to prospective immigrants; his pastoral services as a Methodist minister at Potosi, Wisconsin, and in the Lake Winnebago circuit; economic conditions as seen through his work as a clerk in stores at Linden and elsewhere. Some letters from the original collection have been omitted due to illegibility.

Dinsdale, Matthew Papers, 1836-1897: Call Number, Wis MSS DL, folder 3 ([unpublished])

Selection of letters by Rev. Dinsdale written from Linden and other Wisconsin settlements to his relatives in Askrigg, Yorkshire, England, describing his trip to the United States in 1844 and giving minute advice to prospective immigrants; his pastoral services as a Methodist minister at Potosi, Wisconsin, and in the Lake Winnebago circuit; economic conditions as seen through his work as a clerk in stores at Linden and elsewhere. Some letters from the original collection have been omitted due to illegibility.

Dinsdale, Matthew Papers, 1836-1897: Call Number, Wis MSS DL, folder 4 ([unpublished])

Selection of letters by Rev. Dinsdale written from Linden and other Wisconsin settlements to his relatives in Askrigg, Yorkshire, England, describing his trip to the United States in 1844 and giving minute advice to prospective immigrants; his pastoral services as a Methodist minister at Potosi, Wisconsin, and in the Lake Winnebago circuit; economic conditions as seen through his work as a clerk in stores at Linden and elsewhere. Some letters from the original collection have been omitted due to illegibility.

Douglas, James James and Margaret Douglas letters, 1840-1843 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Milwaukee SC 162 ([unpublished])

James and Margaret Douglas Letters, 1840-1843 (MILWAUKEE) - Selections of typed transcripts of letters describing conditions in America to family members in Scotland from immigrants James and Margaret Douglas, who lived first in Mt. Morris, New York, then settled near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1844.

Drew, James Reminiscences, 1845-1846 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, SC 1917 ([unpublished])

James Drew, Reminiscences, 1845-1846 (WHS) - Reminiscences of a Glasgow couple's visit, July 1845-April 1846, to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, including information on farming, land prices, impressions of the people, local government, schools, and religion. Originals are in the New York Historical Society, New York, N.Y. 16 typed pages.

Goodnow, Lyman Recollection, 1880? [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Milwaukee SC 19 ([unpublished])

Lymann Goodnow, Recollection, 1880? (MILWAUKEE) - Typed manuscript of Goodnow's account of how he helped the first slave escape to Canada from Wisconsin the Territory in 1843. 11 pages of typed transcriptions.

Hagen family; Lian, Anders Papers, 1879-1899 [Translations]: Call Number, Eau Claire Mss CC Box 1 Folder 3 ([unpublished])

Hagen Family Papers, 1879-1899 (EAU CLAIRE) - Family histories and typed translations of letters from several Norwegian immigrants to the Eau Claire, Wisconsin area: Anders (Andrew) P. Solem, maternal grandfather of the collection's donor, Harold Hagen; Elling (Erling) Andersen Sende, Hagen's paternal great-grandfather; and Anders Lian (also known as Andrew Lee), Hagen's maternal grandmother's cousin. Letters by Anders P. Solem are directed to his grandfather in Norway. In them he describes his experiences working in sawmills and lumber camps, comments on labor conditions, including a strike for the ten-hour day, and offers various observances regarding life in America. Letters by Elling Anderson Sende and his wife Guruanna relate family matters and further detail life in Eau Claire. Letters written to Anders Lian and his family concern arrangements for bringing him to America. The largest group of letters in the collection are written by Anders Lian to his family in Norway. They also document work in the lumber industry and discuss current events, and the economic and political climate in 1890s America. Also of interest are Lian's experiences enlisting in a military training camps as a volunteer soldier at the time of the Spanish-American war. The family histories in the collection were written by Genevieve Hagen and include biographical details as well as genealogical information for each of the correspondents. 89 pages of typed translations from the original Norwegian and original family histories.

Hagen family; Sende, Elling Anderson Papers, 1879-1899 [Translations]: Call Number, Eau Claire Mss CC Box 1 Folder 2 ([unpublished])

Hagen Family Papers, 1879-1899 (EAU CLAIRE) - Family histories and typed translations of letters from several Norwegian immigrants to the Eau Claire, Wisconsin area: Anders (Andrew) P. Solem, maternal grandfather of the collection's donor, Harold Hagen; Elling (Erling) Andersen Sende, Hagen's paternal great-grandfather; and Anders Lian (also known as Andrew Lee), Hagen's maternal grandmother's cousin. Letters by Anders P. Solem are directed to his grandfather in Norway. In them he describes his experiences working in sawmills and lumber camps, comments on labor conditions, including a strike for the ten-hour day, and offers various observances regarding life in America. Letters by Elling Anderson Sende and his wife Guruanna relate family matters and further detail life in Eau Claire. Letters written to Anders Lian and his family concern arrangements for bringing him to America. The largest group of letters in the collection are written by Anders Lian to his family in Norway. They also document work in the lumber industry and discuss current events, and the economic and political climate in 1890s America. Also of interest are Lian's experiences enlisting in a military training camps as a volunteer soldier at the time of the Spanish-American war. The family histories in the collection were written by Genevieve Hagen and include biographical details as well as genealogical information for each of the correspondents. 89 pages of typed translations from the original Norwegian and original family histories.

Hagen family; Solem, Andrew P. Papers, 1879-1899 [Translations]: Call Number, Eau Claire Mss CC Box 1 Folder 1 ([unpublished])

Hagen Family Papers, 1879-1899 (EAU CLAIRE) - Family histories and typed translations of letters from several Norwegian immigrants to the Eau Claire, Wisconsin area: Anders (Andrew) P. Solem, maternal grandfather of the collection's donor, Harold Hagen; Elling (Erling) Andersen Sende, Hagen's paternal great-grandfather; and Anders Lian (also known as Andrew Lee), Hagen's maternal grandmother's cousin. Letters by Anders P. Solem are directed to his grandfather in Norway. In them he describes his experiences working in sawmills and lumber camps, comments on labor conditions, including a strike for the ten-hour day, and offers various observances regarding life in America. Letters by Elling Anderson Sende and his wife Guruanna relate family matters and further detail life in Eau Claire. Letters written to Anders Lian and his family concern arrangements for bringing him to America. The largest group of letters in the collection are written by Anders Lian to his family in Norway. They also document work in the lumber industry and discuss current events, and the economic and political climate in 1890s America. Also of interest are Lian's experiences enlisting in a military training camps as a volunteer soldier at the time of the Spanish-American war. The family histories in the collection were written by Genevieve Hagen and include biographical details as well as genealogical information for each of the correspondents. 89 pages of typed translations from the original Norwegian and original family histories.

Hartwig, Theodore E. F. Letters, 1846 and 1851 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, SC 167 ([unpublished])

Theodore E.F. Hartwig, Letters, 1846 and 1851 (WHS) - Two typewritten translations of letters, written by Dr. Theodore E. F. Hartwig, Cedarburg, Wisconsin, September 25, 1846 and November 21, 1851, to his family in Germany describing his trip to the United States by sailing vessel, railroad, and lake steamer to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and describing Cedarburg and Milwaukee. 30 pages of typed translations from the original German.

Hastings, Lucy A. Family correspondence, 1838, 1855-1874: Call Number, Eau Claire SC 35 ([unpublished])

Family correspondence to and from Lucy A. Hastings and her husband David; including letters from relatives in Dexter, Michigan, and an 1855 description of moving from Massachusetts to Oxford, Wisconsin, and information on Indians around Oxford, moving to Eau Claire in 1857, and an Indian panic there in 1862.

Hastings, Lucy A. Family correspondence, 1838, 1855-1874 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Eau Claire SC 35 ([unpublished])

Family correspondence to and from Lucy A. Hastings and her husband David; including letters from relatives in Dexter, Michigan, and an 1855 description of moving from Massachusetts to Oxford, Wisconsin, and information on Indians around Oxford, moving to Eau Claire in 1857, and an Indian panic there in 1862. Uncorrected OCRd transcriptions of some letters available.

Hodges, William Letter, 1856: Call Number, River Falls SC 73 ([unpublished])

One letter dated June 11, 1856, written by Hodges describing pioneer conditions in Pierce County, Wisconsin. Uncorrected OCRd transcription available.

Hollister, Uriah S., 1838-1929 Letter and reminiscences, 1839 and ca. 1912: Call Number, Whitewater SC 41 ([unpublished])

Typewritten transcription of reminiscences, ca. 1912, by Hollister, Delavan, Wisconsin, concerning the settlement and growth of the area and youthful experiences; and one letter, 1839, written by his mother describing the family's trip from New York to Wisconsin and their new surroundings. Uncorrected OCRd text available.

Huey, Thomas, Mrs. Address, 1924 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Stout SC 18 ([unpublished])

Mrs. Thomas Huey, Address, 1924 (STOUT) - Address given in 1924 by Mrs. Thomas Huey in which she reminisces about her life in Dunn County, Wisconsin, between 1863 and 1883; and a postcard from Henry E. Knapp in which he comments on the address. 7 pages of typed transcriptions.

Miller, Ellen Spaulding, 1843- Papers, 1863, 1870-1887 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Eau Claire Mss BF ([unpublished])

Selections from Ellen Spaulding Miller, Papers, 1863, 1870-1887 (EAU CLAIRE) - Selections from the papers of a woman who lived in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in the 1870s. The collection consists largely of letters written principally by Ellen Spaulding Miller to family members who probably lived in New York. The letters reflect domestic life, family relationships, economic conditions, lumbering, religious revivals, and health conditions in the lumbering capital of northwestern Wisconsin. 115 pages.

Moulton, Emeline M. Letters, 1846-1853: Call Number, Parkside SC 71 ([unpublished])

Letters from Emeline M. Moulton and other settlers of Rochester, Racine County, Wisconsin, to relatives in Cabot, Vermont, discussing prices of commodities and family matters and briefly referring to unhappy experiences of men who had joined the California gold rush.

Myrick, Nathan, 1822-1903 Reminiscences, 1892: Call Number, La Crosse SC 2460 ([unpublished])

Typewritten copy of a letter from Nathan Myrick, an early settler of La Crosse, Wisconsin, to F. A. Copeland, Mayor of La Crosse, dated St. Paul, Minnesota, January 28th, 1892, in which he provides a brief account of his life and reminiscences of his arrival at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in 1841 and subsequent life as a trader in the settlement of La Crosse, until his departure for Minnesota, ca. 1850. Uncorrected OCRd text available.

Plumbe, John, 1809-1857 Diary, 1838-1839: Call Number, Platteville SC 11 ([unpublished])

Diary kept by Plumbe, the owner and promoter of the boom town of Sinipee, Wis., on the Mississippi River. Detailed entries describe the platting and settlement of Sinipee, the writing and publication of his promotional book "Sketches of Iowa and Wisconsin," and his efforts to secure wagon roads and railroad connections to Milwaukee, Racine, and Chicago. Some entries touch an lumber rafting, lead shipments, and steamboat traffic, and there are references to Byron Kilbourn, James D. Doty, William R. Smith, and others interested in the development of southwestern Wisconsin and Dubuque, Iowa.

Ranney, Orpha Papers, 1847-1898, 1914, 1934: Call Number, Stout SC 118 ([unpublished])

Photocopies of letters from Ranney, Dunn County, Wis., to her sister Adah Holcomb in New Hartford, Conn., including details of her trip from New York to Wisconsin and describing illnesses, children, deaths, domestic chores, farming, weather, Christmas, and other details of daily life. Uncorrected OCRd transcriptions of some letters available.

Salter, George H., 1826-ca. 1906 Papers, ca. 1896-1913, 1965: Call Number, Stevens Point SC 60 ([unpublished])

Photocopied material relating to the life of "Daddy" Salter of Juneau County, Wis. who is said to have killed many Native Americans in retaliation for his wife's murder at their Town of Clearfield tavern. Included is a 34-page typewritten description by Salter of his departure from England; travels (1843-1864) in Wisconsin to Portage, Reedsburg, and Kilbourn City, and down the Mississippi River to New Orleans; life in Wisconsin; and an account of his brutal slaying of two Native Americans suspected of murdering his wife. Also included is a 4-page typewritten obituary (ca. 1906) of Salter in which he is said to have admitted to murdering eighteen Native Americans. Uncorrected OCRd text available.

Shepard, Charles Papers, 1850-1958: Call Number, Platteville Micro 2 ([unpublished])

Papers of Charles Shepard and other residents of the black settlement of Pleasant Ridge (now Beetown), Wisconsin, including letters, tax receipts, and community history. Shepard (Sheppard) was the head of the first African-American family to settle in what became a pioneer black community about five miles west of Lancaster, Wisconsin. In 1848, the family of William Horner, a Haymarket, Virginia planter, moved to Wisconsin, bringing with them their freed slaves: Charles and Caroline Shepard (nee Brent), their three children, Harriet, John and Mary, and Charles' brother Isaac. A woman named Sarah Brown, who was left behind in slavery, later joined this family after Isaac returned to Virginia and paid for the woman's freedom. The two then married. Charles and Isaac left a mother and several brothers and sisters in Virginia who planned on heading west at a later date. Eventually, these individuals migrated to Washington D.C. The letters are chiefly communications between the Shepards in Wisconsin and their relatives in the East. Other letters are those of Thomas and John Greene, other settlers of Pleasant Ridge.

Tillman Brothers (La Crosse, Wis.) Records, 1856-1899 [Translations]: Call Number, La Crosse Mss K ([unpublished])

Selections from Tillman Brothers (La Crosse, Wisconsin), Records, 1856-1899 (LA CROSSE) -Translations of a diary kept by Friedrich Tillman, partner in a furniture and undertaking establishment founded in 1859 in La Crosse, when he sailed to America from Germany in 1856. 23 pages of hand written translations from the original German.

Wells, Milton Letter, 1844 [Transcriptions]: Call Number, Box 139 Folder 24 ([unpublished])

Milton Wells, Letter 1844 (WHS) - Typewritten copy of a letter written by Reverend Wells of Burlington, Racine County, Wisconsin Territory, to Charles Hall, Secretary of the American Board of Home Missions, concerning the plight of Norwegian immigrants in the Town of Rochester and his need for aid to help them. 3 pages of typed transcriptions.

Superior, Wisconsin, papers, 1831-1942: Call Number, Superior MSS A box 4 ([unpublished])

A selection of WPA collected and transcribed recollections of Superior area pioneers from a larger collection of papers, many of them copied from originals, relating to Superior and dealing with the area's history, including material on the fur trade, Indian trails, harbor, parks, schools, prisons, ethnic groups, aviation, housing, and churches.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1852: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 1 ([unpublished])

L. Mills, Wis, Dec. 6, 1852 WI.Letters2q.i0001

1852, Dec. 6. E.D. Seward, Lake Mills, to Rev. Martin Dudley, Easton, Connecticut. Meeting house was dedicated on October 22. Have bell weighing 628 pounds procured by the ladies of the church for $200. Comments on mutual friends. Likes the Independent magazine. His eyesight is very poor. A.L.S. 3pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1837: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 2 ([unpublished])

Prairie du Chien [Wisconsin]/ 20 June 1837 WI.Letters2r.i0001

Gen. Joseph M. Street, Prairie du Chien, to Capt. E. A. Hitchcock, St. Louis. Wonders why the government does not send the money for the current expenses and for the Indian [Annuities?]. All shall starve if the money does not come soon. Indians already starving. Grateful for the loan of one thousand dollars to his son, Joseph. A.L.S. 1p.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1838: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 3 ([unpublished])

P. Fonda Esq. South Port Wisconsin Teritory [sic] April 26, 1838 WI.Letters2s.i0001

1838, Apr. 26. G. P. Post, South Port [Kenosha], to Peter Fonda, Fultonville, New York. "Dear Father." Tells of the scarcity of meat and flour and especially currency most of which comes from Michigan where the banks are in a "reched" condition. The lack of currency retards all enterprise. The government has not yet passed a preemption for settlers on government land. Hopes land will not be ordered for sale before preemption bill is passed. Saw steamboat on way to Chicago yesterday. A.L.S. 2pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1840: Call Number, Wis Mss Box 1 Folder 4 ([unpublished])

Circular/ Pleasant Prairie W. T. Nov 20th 1840 WI.Letters2t.Lette01
1840, Nov. 20. Calvin Stevens, Pleasant Prairie, to his brother Samuel H. Stevens, Enosburgh, Vermont. Wisconsin far surpasses New England in Natural beauty and fertility of soil. Yet farmers are worse off here than they were in the East. Principal means of obtaining cash is through selling land. There is no market for cash crops. Poverty and hardships rampant, but feels that Wisconsin will eventually become the richest part of the union. A.L.S. 4pp.
Elkhorn July 6th 1840 WI.Letters2t.Lette02
1840, July 6. M.A.N.B., Elkhorn, to Jay Hathway, Rome, New York. Wants Hathaway to send a certificate of deposit of as much money as he can spare --- about three hundred dollars at least. Also wants a threshing machine (one of Hale's patents) freight prepaid and Hale's permission to use it in the town of Elkhorn. Also wants a Green's straw cutter, sent same way. A.L.S. 3pp.
Lapointe 10th September 1840 WI.Letters2t.Lette03
1840, Sept. 10. Charles W. Borup, LaPointe, to David Oakes, Granville, Michigan. [Postmarked Falls of St. Croix] Wants Oakes to insure "the buildings" and charge to Mr. Crooks. A.L.S. 1p.
Prairieville May 27, [illegible]/ Dear brother WI.Letters2t.Lette04
1840, May 27. Mrs. Julia Griffing, Prairieville [Waukesha], to her brother Henry D. Bacon, St. Louis. Enjoyed a revival of religion in this place last spring. Extends invitation for a visit. Says that the "stage" passes her house twice a week and that the "society" is very good for a new country. A.L.S. 2pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1841: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 5 ([unpublished])

Geneva April 15 1841 WI.Letters2u.Lette01
1841, April 15. Martin Stevens, Geneva, to J. L. Baker, Whitesborough, New York. Wants Baker to sell his (Stevens') place for three-hundred and fifty dollars with at least two hundred dollars down. A.L.S. 1p.
Bristol Racine Co Sunday June 27 1841 WI.Letters2u.Lette02
1841, June 27. Mrs. Rebecca M. Byington, Bristol, to Lucius Tuttle, Wolcott, Connecticut. "Dear Parents." Tells of family. Nostalgic, but believes that Wisconsin is more beautiful than Connecticut. Family living in 15 by 18 feet log house. Built a barn 24 by 30 feet for the payment of which some of the live stock were sold. A.L.S. 3pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1842: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 6 ([unpublished])

Beloit Jan. 18th 1842 WI.Letters2v.Lette01
1842, Jan. 18. David Noggle, Beloit, to J. M. Burrows, Davenport, Iowa. Discusses some business matters. Gives assurances that there is nothing to be suspicious of. Denies scurrilous information that "may have been imparted to Burrows by the greatest scoundrel that ever lived in Beloit." A.L.S. 3pp.
Southport Wisconsin Tery./ October 11th 1842 WI.Letters2v.Lette02
1842, Oct. 11. James Taffe, South Port [Kenosha], to the Treasurer of the Savings Bank, Chambers St., New York. Asks that his money on deposit be forwarded to him. Appended is his draft for $600. in the hand- writing of George Burnett. L.S. 1p. It is accompanied by a letter from George Burnett dated Oct. 5, 1842 recommending the payment. A.L.S. 1p.
Prairie du Chien Feby 15 1842 WI.Letters2v.Lette03
1842, Feb. 15. J. P. Kiddu, Prairie du Chien, to L. S. Goodno, Braintree, Vermont. Law business good. Has a stake in all that is going on of any importance. Will return by way of the "Rivers" through New York to Vermont. Reluctant to leave but Mrs. Kiddu is home- sick. Believes "this country" better for any kind of business than Vermont. Note appended by Mrs. Kiddu expressing great joy at the prospects of going home. A.L.S. 3pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1843: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 7 ([unpublished])

Janesville March 12th 1843 WI.Letters2w.Lette01
1843, Mar. 12. E. Gary, Janesville, to his cousin Luther Cary Esq., Boston, Erie Ct. New York. Fulfills promise to write made when he left New York last fall Father' s family well and apparently contented though living in a log house. Writer has been splitting rails. Had thought of teaching school during the winter instead, and wishes he had done so. Hopes his cousin has recovered from "Texas fever." Today, Sunday, went three miles to a seven by nine log school house to attend church services. Sunday the most lonesome day in the new country. A.L.S. 4pp.
Racine March 12 1843 WI.Letters2w.Lette02
1843, Mar. 12. B. R. Perkins, Racine, to his brother Barnalias Perkins, Columbus, Ohio. Family news. The mouth of the Root River large enough for any craft that sails the lakes. Town needs a [harbor?] which he thinks it will get soon. Advises brother to come to Racine and ply his trade. Says that there are no carriage makers in the vicinity. A.L.S. 2pp.
Lafaette [sic] October 31 the 1843 WI.Letters2w.Lette03
1843, Oct. 31. Lucian Enos, Lafayette to his parents, David Enos, Pulaski, New York. Details of a trip from New York by steamer and costs. Arrived at Racine. Considerable illness, probably fever and ague. Differences in this country and New York not great. Can girdle the timber and sow wheat among the trees. May have to work out at $10. a month or can cut cordwood. Many family inquires. A.L.S. 3pp.
Milwaukie [sic] May 6th 1843 WI.Letters2w.Lette04
1843, May 6. E. T. Eastman, Milwaukee, to his father Samuel Eastman, Strong, Maine. Most severe winter in eighteen years, "so say the Indians." Weather has prevented steamboat navigation. No boat from Buffalo yet. Writer is prospering in real estate and building business. Sells lots in exchange for work on two brick houses that he is building. Lots that he bought for $20. now sell for $50. and $60. He also exchanges lots for crops. A.L.S. 4pp.
[City Illegible] Oct 15 1843 WI.Letters2w.Lette05
1843, Oct. 15. --------- ---------, Prairieville [Waukesha], to her brother Major G. G. [Tobey Pott?], Jay, New York. Climate very injurious to health. Many sick with chill, fever, and ague. Smallpox raging in Milwaukee. Very little fruit except pumpkins and apples at 10 shillings a bushel. Wheat is fifty cents a bushel, Oats 3 shillings, potatoes 25 cents, fresh pork 5 cents a pound. Young people appear cold and indifferent. A.L.S. 4pp.
Beloit, Wisconsin Territory, Sat. Aug. 26, 1843 WI.Letters2w.Lette06
1843, Aug. 26. Abel Wood, Beloit, to his father Benjamin F. Wood, Westminister, Massachusetts. Has just arrived. Describes trip by way of New York, Albany, Buffalo, and Chicago. From Chicago he traveled by stage coach to Belvidere where he procured a horse on which he completed his journey to Beloit. Engaged as a preacher at Beloit. Gives high praise to "Temperance Houses" where travelers "meet none of those red-nosed, blear-eyed, foul-mouthed, roguish-looking, mischief-loving, devil-serving gentry." A.L.S. 4pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1844: Call Number, Wis MSS MY Box 1 Folder 8 ([unpublished])

Delavan Walworth Co/ W. T./ March 1st 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette01
1844, Mar. 1. A. B. Winchell, Delavan, to Rev. Benjamin Hill, Corresponding Secretary of the American Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Reports success of mission work. Congregations are large, solemn, and attentive. Gives quarterly report: 40 pastoral visits, 80 religious meetings, and 3 temperance meetings. Obtained 64 subscribers to the pledge. Preached at Colorado Springs, Sugar Creek, Jefferson, White Water, and Koskonong. A.L.S. 1p.
Burlington Oct. 2 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette02
1844, Oct. 2. Roswell Oheney, Burlington [Foxville], to the executive committee of the Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Reports on the second quarter of his appointment which closed September 30. Receives very little pay in the field. Asks that pay for six months missionary labor be remitted. A.L.S. 2pp.
Rochester April the 7. 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette03
1844, Apr. 7. Philander Cole, Rochester, to his uncle John Vaughn, Woodstock, Vermont. There is much sickness in the area. Some die of the ague. Norwegians are "indolent" people. Some are smart but not so smart as our Indians. Goods as cheap as in Vermont. Plows $5 to $7, two horses and wagon from $55 to $80, oxen $45 to $55, cows $10 to 15. Also mentions the prices of some of the lesser commodities. Good hunting and fishing. A.L.S. 3pp.
Spring Prarie [sic] April 3 the 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette04
1844, Apr. 3. Lucian Enos, Spring Green, to his sister Nancy Enos, Richland, New York. Has been keeping the widow, the fatherless, and aiding the doctors. Is starting work [Doing what?] at $11 a month. Attends church and Sunday school. Family and neighborhood gossip. A.L.S. 3pp.
Stockbridge Near Green Bay W. T. March 28, 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette05
1844, Mar. 28. Cutting Marsh, Postmaster at Stockbridge, to John W. Quinney, Washington, D.C. Requests that some business be taken care of for him in Washington and New York. A.L.S. 3pp.
Geneva, Walworth Co,. Wis. Terr/ January 1st 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette06
1844, Jan. 1. Peter Conrad, Geneva, to Rev. Benjamin Hill, Corresponding Secretary of the American Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Application for appointment as pastor of the Geneva Baptist Church countersigned by Joseph W. Case, comity of the church. Describes the rapid growth of other religious denominations. Some mention of the economic life. A.L.S. 4pp.
Elkhorn Dec 2d 1844 WI.Letters2x.Lette07
1844, Dec. 2. George Sale, Elkhorn, to Miss Hannah Gale, Waterbury, Vermont. Enjoyed trip back home. Bought some books in New York on way back to Wisconsin. Was out hunting with the Judge during the recent term of the court. Will sell a piece of land in the East to her for $50. May be married soon. Have large writing and singing school. A.L.S. 3pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1845: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 9 ([unpublished])

Plattville [sic] Grant Co W. T./ Dec 8/ [18]45 WI.Letters2y.Lette01
1845, Dec. George R. Laughton, Platteville, to F. L. Church, Providence. Announces the birth of a son, Frederick George. Touches on Oregon question. There is much poverty among the miners. The society is bad. No Episcopal church and no hope of getting one. Would sell out tomorrow if an opportunity offered itself. A.L.S. 4pp.
Fort Atkinson/ July 27th 1845 WI.Letters2y.Lette02
1845, July 27. Rosina Clark, Fort Atkinson, Iowa [Postmarked Prairie du Chien.], to her brother Temple Clark, Ceresco, Wisconsin Territory. Discuses family affairs. Yearns for home. Feels like an "exile." A.L.S. 4pp.
Mineral Point Augt 19th 1845 WI.Letters2y.Lette03
1845, Aug. 19. John Brackin, Mineral Point, to S. Staats Taylor, Philadelphia. Mr. Bracken is evidently a legal representative of the Bank of the U.S. Discusses affairs pertaining to the bank's business. A.L.S. 1p.
Southport, Sept. 16 1845 WI.Letters2y.Lette04
1845, Sept. 16. George S. Willis, South Port [Kenosha], to Calvin Fletcher, Indianapolis. Briefly discusses personal business matters. A.L.S. 1p.
[Collection of letters to Rev. Benjamin M. Hill] WI.Letters2y.Lette05
1845, Mar. 29. Peter Conrad, Prairieville [Waukesha], to Rev. Benjamin M. Hill, Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. As the missionary of Wisconsin Convention, he has explored the new parts of the territory and finds them destitute [of the Baptist religion]. Voted against a board resolution instructing him "to secure on behalf of our brethern in bonds the prayers and votes of all Christians." Refuses to go into the field as a political partisan. Two applications for missionary appointments, Jaques Delany, East Troy, and James Delany, Sullivan. The former is countersigned by Gaylord Graves and the latter by Jerimiah Osborn. A.L.S. 4pp.
Point Boss, Feb. 15, 1845 WI.Letters2y.Lette06
1845, Feb. 15. Edward Knight, Point Boss, to Mrs. J. L. Hale, New York. [Postmarked Fort Winnebago.] Would like to secure a loan from Hale to help pay for his farm at Sun Prairie. Is now teaching school on the Wisconsin River ten miles from Grand Rapids "where I lived last summer." Will soon start for home with cattle he collected on a debt. A.L.S. 3pp.
I last Sunday wrote you and Thomas WI.Letters2y.Lette07
1845, Aug. 24. E. S., Platteville, to Edward Symmes, Westford, Massachusetts. Illustrates "Western vicisitudes" by telling an involved story of a town women who remarried three weeks after her husband' s death and of an ensuing property entanglement that nearly resulted in a duel. Little of the sort could happen in the "Christian" states of the East. A.L.S. 4pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1846: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 10 ([unpublished])

Fonddulac [sic], Oct 20th 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette01
1846, Oct. 20. John A. Eastman, Fond du Lac, to Miss Frances A. Eastman, Strong, Maine. Hard work has reduced his weight form 170 pounds to 148 pounds. Asks for Franc's daguerreotype, to see what change three years have made. Changes in Fund du Lac. Busy. Is Postmaster there. Have nine mails a week. A.L.S. 3pp.
Portage Prairie Columbia County June 15th 18[46] WI.Letters2z.Lette02
1846, June 15. L. B. Enos, Portage Prairie, to his sister Nancy Enos, South Richland, New York. Describes the town and a few of the inhabitants in some detail. A.L.S. 3pp.
Manitowwoc [sic] July the 13th, 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette03
1846, July 13. William Perry Dolber, Manitowoc, to Mrs. Zebina Cushman, Ripton, Vermont. Arrived May 8. Works for $14 a month "as long as I am a mind to stay." An 800 foot pier has been built and settlers are expected to land here. Neighborhood news. A.L.S. 3pp.
Rec 24th Octr/ [Illegible] Wm Jessup & Sons WI.Letters2z.Lette04
1846, Oct. 6. William J. Hunt, Racine, to William Jessup Sons, New York. Encloses $150. If the [reel?] does not come before the close of navigation, it will be a grievous injury to him. A.L.S. 1p.
Milwaukee Wisconsin Ter'y Dec. 30th 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette05
1846, Dec. 30. Lewis Raymond, Milwaukee, to Rev. B[enjamin] M. Hill, New York. Report of work done under the appointment of the American Baptist Home Missionary Society for the quarter ending January 1, 1846 [1847?]. Report brief because he and his wife were afflicted with the "prevailing sickness." Revivals for the winter look promising, but poor health prevents his taking part. A.L.S. 3pp.
Racine March 24, 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette06
1846, Mar. 24. S. A. Perkins, Racine, to brother Barnabus Perkins, New Haven. Benjamin dead of inflammatory rheumatism. Rev. C. F. LeFevre officiated at the funeral. George and his wife living in town where George is making threshing machines. Painting window curtains, but not making much money. A.L.S. 2pp.
Columbia County W T Oct 26 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette07
1846, Oct. 26. L. B. Enos, Waushara, to his sister Julia Enos, South Richland, New York. Has been well though sickness surrounds him. Most people have the ague with some cases of bilious fever. Plenty of government land yet, but doubts if there will be any left by spring. Corn is good. Sells at 25 cents a bushel, wheat 50 cents a bushel, beef $3 to $4 a hundred pounds. Prairies are burning, a beautiful sight. A.L.S. 2pp.
Fox Lake January the 5, 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette08
1846, Jan. 5. L. B. Enos, Fox Lake [Waushara], to his father David Enos, South Richland, New York. New land is being settled rapidly by peoples from many countries. Is enthusiastic about the great opportunities offered in the new territory. Gives some family and local news. A.L.S. 3pp.
Janesville April 10th 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette09
1846, Apr. 10. Luke Cheseboro, Janesville, to his uncle Cyrus Williams, New Haven. Has made seven trips, 800 to 900 miles, to Lake Michigan by ox team this winter, hauling wheat at 15 cents per bushel and carting and bringing back lumber for $5 per thousand, besides drawing all the family' s firewood five miles and going to the mill. Finished breaking land and sowed seventy acres of wheat last fall, and ten acres of oats. Details of controversy with Thomas ---------. Family news. A.L.S. 4pp.
Milwaukie [sic] W. T. July 1st, 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette10
1846, July 1. Lewis Raymond, Milwaukee, to Rev. B[enjamin] M. Hill, Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Report for the quarter ending July 1, 1846. Delivered 48 sermons, attended 21 prayer meetings, baptized 6, attended 5 funerals, and solemnized 2 marriages. Includes some details concerning finances, membership, and government of the church. Slavery question is troublesome. If the board will forward $100., they will do the greatest kindness.
Green Bay W. T. Feb. 16th 1846 WI.Letters2z.Lette11
1846, Feb. 16. Jeremiah Porter, Green Bay, to his father Dr. William Porter, Hadley, Massachusetts. Pays filial respects. Remarks on the spring-like weather. Tells of the success of his religious work, and relates some local occurrences. A.L.S. 4pp.
Geneva Walworth Co Wis. Ter/ July 13th/ [18]46 WI.Letters2z.Lette12
1846, July 13. Joel W. Fish, Geneva, to Rev. Benjamin M. Hill, Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Report for the quarter ending July 1, 1846. His people [parishioners] have paid nothing during the quarter for missions, Bible publication, or educational societies. Asks that his salary be forwarded. A.L.S. 2pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1847: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 11 ([unpublished])

Febuary [sic] 9 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette01
1847, Feb. 9. Edwin Higby, Prairieville, to his cousin Anson Bates, East Granby, Connecticut. Asks for news of family. Had fever and ague for three months last season. A.L.S. 2pp.
Milwaukee Feby. 27.1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette02
1847, Feb. 27. A. D. Smith, Milwaukee, to Hon. Elisha Morrow, Green Bay. Rejoices at the good prospect of the victory of the constitution. Predicts majority of from 200 to 400 for it. Combination of opposing Whigs and Democrats broken. A.L.S. 1p.
Madison April 6th 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette03
1847, Apr. 6. George W. Mitchell, Madison, to Hon. E[lisha] Morrow, Green Bay. Asks Morrow to force a collection [of note] on Mr. Whiting for Samuel R. Mervill. He will charge for collecting. A.L.S. 1p.
Whitewater Jan. 28 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette04
1847, Jan. 28. John L. Clark, White Water, to G. W. Harmon, Pawlet, Vermont. Business matters concerning the writer's wool factory. A.L.S. 2pp.
Plattville [sic] Grant Co Wis/ [January?] 22/ [18]47 WI.Letters2aa.Lette05
1847, Jan. 22. George R. Laughton, Platteville, to F. L. Church. Providence. An outlet for produce needed. Preliminary survey for the Chicago and Galena railroad now in progress. Gives some commodity prices. "Plattevilleans" have recently entertained by Rev. Cidevant [Col. Lehmanvousky?] of "Boney's Old Guard" who gave four interesting lectures on Bonaparte's campaigns in Russia and Egypt. Thermometer at 32 below zero. A.L.S. 3pp.
East Troy Sept 23 [18]47 WI.Letters2aa.Lette06
1847, Sept. 23. Absalom Miner, East Troy, to Rev. B[enjamin] M. Hill, Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Gives ten thousand thanks for Christian sympathy in his sad hour of irreparable calamity. Plans to be at the New York State Convention. They are not aware that some movements in some parts of the West do not altogether harmonize with the operations of the Home Missionary Society. A.L.S. 2pp.
Sheboygan Jun 26th 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette07
1847, June 26. Edward Ellwell, Sheboygan, to A. K. Peckham, Tunkhannock, Pa. Sheboygan growing fast, for there are now several hotels, stores, etc. Thinks the country is "bad". Too poor to support so large a town. The amount of building exceeds anything he ever saw before. There will be a state government soon. A.L.S. 3pp.
White oaksprings/ Lafayet [sic] Co/ Wisconsant [sic] Teritory [sic]/ August 14 the [sic] 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette08
1847, Aug. 14. Samuel Light, White Oak Springs, to Benjamin T. Kristine, Crawfordville, Indiana. Received a letter from C. Snyder saying that he had the money all ready for the writer. Collect the money as fast as it comes due. A.L.S. 1p.
Lafaette [sic] December 11--1847-- WI.Letters2aa.Lette09
1847, Dec. 11. Mary M. Rogers, Lafayette [Sent from Spring Prairie (Franklin) on Dec. 25.], to Miss Nancy Enos, South Richland, New York. Has erysipelas very bad. Called the doctor twice. All have sore eyes. Would like to go back again. "The children often speak within themselves they want to go back again." Mr. Rogers likes the country as well as he expected he should. A.L.S. 3pp.
[June 30, 1847]/ Dear brother, WI.Letters2aa.Lette10
1847, June 30. William Brand, Pleasant Prairie, the Rev. Benjamin [M.] Hill, Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Report for the quarter ending June 30, 1847. Gave 37 sermons, attended 6 prayer meetings, visited religiously families, traveled 224 miles doing his work, obtained 4 signatures to temperance pledges. Sunday schools not well-attended owing to jealousies and mistakes resulting from the conflict going on among the several different denominations. A.L.S. 2pp.
Neenah July fifth 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette11
1847, July 5. D. C. Hank, Neenah, to his brother N.B. Finch, Jay, New York. Will be married in a few moments. Wishes that the money had been sent to him by mail instead of by P. Bowman, for then he could be sure of receiving it. It is a good business (entering land for other people). Money is worth from 12 to 25 percent [of what?] here. A.L.S. 3pp.
Burlington July 17 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette12
1847, July 17. Amy B. Foster, Burlington [now Illinois], To Stephen Benedict, Sherburne, New York. "Dear parents." Neighbor and family gossip. Crops good. A.L.S. 3pp.
New Diggings July 17th 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette13
1847, July 17. Olive ---------, New Diggings, to her uncle Jeremiah Allen, Walpole, Massachusetts. Brother had a call from the church at Platteville to become the pastor. Church at Platteville very much divided. Electa's brother Erwin to come and preach at Platteville until brother can leave here. She would not like to remain here teaching after brother is gone. Forming societies in the East to send teachers West. Probably a poor idea for the new teachers will not be prepared for the trials that they will be obliged to meet. Four schools in the neighborhood, one a Catholic school. Her school has 34 scholars. 4 Sunday schools here. The Catholics exert much influence. They have a fine church, and are expecting a new bell. A.L.S. 4pp.
Geneva April 20th [1847]/ To Rev. B. M. Hill Secy of Am Bap H. M. Soc'y WI.Letters2aa.Lette14
1847, Apr. 20. J[oel] M. Fish, Geneva, to the Rev. Benjamin Hill, Baptist Home Missionary Society, New York. Received appropriation for the quarter ending April 1, 1847. The sum is incorrect. Balance due is $12.50. A.L.S. 1p.
Manitowoc Sept, 30 1847 WI.Letters2aa.Lette15
1847, Sept. 30. William P. [Dobber?], Manitowoc [Manitowoc Rapids], to Zebiner Cushman, Ripton, Vermont. Is tending the post office now for John P. Chumplin who has gone South to get "doctored." Worked for Mr. Sawyer who only paid $8. a month. The chill fever is pretty common this fall. Steamboats stop here as often as once a week now. A.L.S. 2pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1848: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 12 ([unpublished])

Racine Nov. 8th 1848 WI.Letters2bb.Lette01
1848, Nov. 8. J. P. Osgood, Racine, to Elizabeth Fletcher, Littleton, Massachusetts. "Dear Friend." Will fulfill all promises. A.L.S. 1p.
Geneva Wisconsin [Month not specified] 28th 1848 WI.Letters2bb.Lette02
1848, [Feb.] 28. A. Ferguson, Geneva, to George R. Pubius, Professor Normal School, Albany, New York. Has been in mercantile business 12 years. Wants to send his daughter to school in East, preferably the Albany Female Seminary. Asks advice. A.L.S. 1p.
Muskwonego [sic] Apr 9th 1848 WI.Letters2bb.Lette03
1848, Apr. 9. M. E. Whitney, Mukwonago [Springfield], to Hariett Hart, Victor, New York. Does not get homesick except on Sunday. Lives too far away to walk to church. Uncle has a horse but he is not a "meeting man." Many deaths occurred in the village. "They have a sort of [epodemick?] or black toung that the doctors know nothing about." Has had a little millinery and some dressmaking. Country is better than the writer expected. The settlers are very intelligent. A part of them are from New York State. A.L.S. 3pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1849: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 15 ([unpublished])

North Port Feb. 4th 1849 WI.Letters2cc.i0001

1849, Feb. 4. William Robertson, Northport, to Rev. Samuel Robertson, Waukau. "My Dear Mother." Writes of success of his revival work. Letter appended from Prairieville [Prairie Village], dated March 19, 1849, and signed by D. Robertson. "My Dear Husband." A.L.S. 3pp.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1850: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 13 ([unpublished])

Waukesha Sep. 19 1850 [Letters to/ from Messrs. Remington & Shepard] WI.Letters2dd.i0001

1850, Sept. 19. R. B. Hammond, Waukeska, to Remington and Shepard, Baraboo. Encloses $2. for taxes on lots 11 and 12, block 8. Is willing to sell them for $75. Letter appended from Remington and Shepard, Baraboo, dated Sept. 28, 1850 acknowledging the letter but stating that the $2. were not enclosed. A.L.S. 1p.

Wisconsin territorial letters--1851: Call Number, Wis Mss MY Box 1 Folder 14 ([unpublished])

L. Mills, Wis. Feby 20th 1851 WI.Letters2ee.Lette01
1851, Feb. 20. E.D. Seward, Lake Mills, to Rev. Martin Dudley, Ridgebury, Connecticut. His congregation also building a meeting house. Plan 30 by 4O foot church. Sharing school house with other denominations very unpleasant. Mentions Methodists, Wesleyans, Baptists, Episcopalians, Campbellites, and Swedenborgians. Will have to examine the philosophy of the latter group. Briefly describes a revival that is in progress. A.L.S. 3pp.
L. Mills, Wis. Aug [2] 1851 WI.Letters2ee.Lette02
1851, Aug. [Postmarked Aug. 18.] E.D. Seward, Lake Mills, to Rev. M[artin] Dudley, Ridgebury, Connecticut. Tells of the day to day tasks and other annoyances. Writes enviously, "You live where the ruts are worn deep and the Ark goes along in the road without continual attention." Bought a horse and wagon for $l25. Crops bad - especially wheat. Is thinking of leaving the territory but has no mature plans. Nothing remarkable has happened - except a fire which destroyed a [saleratus?] factory. Attended Christian Anti-slavery Convention at Chicago in July. Briefly describes the anti-slavery meeting and some of the people he saw. A.L.S. 3pp.
Office of Washburne & Woodman/ Mineral Point, Wisconsin, Nov 20 1851 WI.Letters2ee.Lette03
1851, Nov. 20. Washburn and Woodman, Mineral Point, to James Richardson, Madison. Received the land warrant for location, made the location and enclosed certificate. A.L.S. 1p.

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