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Fischer, Joan (ed.) / Wisconsin people & ideas
Volume 54, Number 1 (Winter 2008)

Barnard, Laura
Remembrance and celebration,   pp. 17-22


Page 17

A new museum dedicated 
to the history and culture 
of Milwaukee's vibrant 
Jewish community opens 
this spring. 
The Yiddisch Folk's Schule photo 
above, taken in 1916, includes 
Golda Meir on the far right. 
All photos courtesy Jewish Museum Milwaukee 
DU CAME TO AMERICA ON THURSDAY, on Monday you 
vere knocking on doors, selling socks and underwear." 
--Martv Stein, late Milwaukee Jewish philanthropist 
For the early Jewish immigrants, 
Milwaukee was a frontier destination. 
It was far removed from the familiar 
points of entry and lay on the outskirts 
of what any of them thought of as the 
civilized United States. 
And indeed, when Jews began arriving 
in Milwaukee in the 1840s, they were 
getting in on the ground floor. That was 
the decade when the City of Milwaukee 
was incorporated and Wisconsin 
achieved statehood. Much of the city 
had yet to be built, and there was room 
for the newcomers to have a profound 
influence on how Milwaukee grew and 
expanded. Jewish Milwaukeeans shaped 
their new city and contributed to its 
institutions, growing into a community 
that now encompasses some 24,000 in 
greater Milwaukee. 
But until now their story has not been 
told-at least not in a comprehensive 
way that would piece together their 
narrative and make it come alive with 
W  ISCONSIN  PEOPLE  &  IDEAS  WINTEER  2008  17 
-M t  Stei, laeMlakeJwihpiatrps 


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