University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Wisconsin State Horticultural Society / The Wisconsin horticulturist
Vol. IV, No. 8 (October 1899)

To prevent strawberry rust,   pp. 18-19 PDF (541.4 KB)


Page 18


18      THFE WISCONSIN HORTICULTURIST.
Planet Junior twelve-tooth cultivator with the pulverizer
attachment. It leaves the surface perfectly level and loose,
so the water below is prevented from rising to the surface
by capillarity.
Cultivation adds no water to the soil but it does hold
that already there for the use of the plants. It aerifies the
soil so that the millions of living organisms which prepare
the food for the plants can do their work and, at the same
time, it renders other minerals soluble so the plants can
take them up and make a vigorous growth, and last and
least it is done to prevent the encroachment of weeds. Most
any grower will cultivate to destroy weeds, but neglects it
when necessary to accomplish the other equally important
results.
Examine texture of your soil and determine how thick
the loose earth or dust mulch should be, and never allow
the teeth to go any deeper. Some soils require two inches,
and very few exceeds three inches. No person must expect
to grow fine fruit who sends the cultivator teeth down
among the feeding roots and tears them to pieces.
TO PREVENT STRAWBERRY RUST.
Strawberry plants should be grown in a special plat
from carefully selected plants which show a tendency to
form strong fruit buds. The propagating beds should be
sprayed with Bordeaux mixture immediately after the plants
are set, using the atomizer sprayer as it will give the plants
the finest mist. It will destroy every spore of rust and leave
the foliage as clean and waxy as the newest growth.
For several years I tried to eliminate this disease by
selecting plants which would resist it. We all know it is a
fungous growth and, under favorable climatic conditions,
will spread very rapidly. Some varieties are more suscep-
tible to it than others, and these are our most productive
n - =s:==


Go up to Top of Page