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Wisconsin farmer and northwestern cultivator
Vol. 4 (1852)

Wisconsin and Iowa farmer, and northwestern cultivator. Vol. IV, no. 7,   pp. [145]-168 PDF (9.3 MB)


Page [145]


WISCONSIN & IOWA FAZRAIER,
                                     AND
uN'ORTv wI w NSITTUiTVAT@
VOL IV.                JAIESVIILE, WIS., JULY, 1852.                    
   NO. 7.
   PUBLISBUD ON TUE FIRST 0P I-CH XOr. m. By
           MARK MJILLER.
              TERXS:
     g0 Cents a Year in Advance;
Fivecopies forS2,if directedtoonePostOffice. andalIthe
wtne rate for a larger number. All subscriptions to corn-
rence with the volume. Back numbers supplied to new
ibscriberl.
             ALDVEIRTISING;
One page per year A   RI
Half pape   *
usarter page                        1I
Eighth page
One square. (twelve lines or less.) 1 eair      6 50
(Lem than one year,) for first insertion       2 s0
For each subsequent insertion          75
OFFICE.-Empire Block, Main St.. in the rooms occupt-
d for the office of the Janesville Gazette.
    For the Wi4sconsin & Iowa Farmer.
Things in Illinois.
SpHINeonLiD, IIL, June 9, '52.
FR=NlID MnILL  .-I reached this very plea-
... ----+-I on th  f 4.rs+ IAv -f th. wpeerk and
have been much too busy, or too iUl, to write
-though I intend to keep my promise.
This Central Illinois is a glorious agricultu-
ral district-Man need ask for nothing better
in the way of fertile soil of the easiest cultiva-
tion-But the Western man is seldom con-
tent5 and the prcsperous settler of to-'ay is
the adventurous pioneer of to-morrow.
  I find vegetation in this region at leasi
three weeks in advance of Chicago, and tht
prospect a cheering one for the farmer-Win-
ter wheat fairly headed out on the 5th of June
and looking well, in all respects.
  The corn crop is, however, the greatcrop a
Central and Southern Illinois--I have seer
A    r- l: 1J. .f _ n *. l-I acr  and a fog
The Legislature is in sessionand Governor
French has taken strong and liberal ground
in favor of Agricultural Education in his mes-
sage.
Our Convention of Farmers is also in ope-
ration. We organized yesterday and have
had three sessions already. We find all wil-
ling to admit that farmers and mechanics
should be educated; but most of the speak-
ers are members or agents of old colleges,
and think that the education should be con-
ducted by these old organizations-or in oth-
er words, if the State will give them the
money, they will promise to create an inferior
practical department, and give a few of our
sons an inferior practical education,-which
shall be labelled as " inferior," by the univer-
sal acknowledgment of a higher degree, in
every college, than the one bestowed upon our
sons, and the sons of noble God-ordained IA-
BoIA          Truly Your Friend,
                       J. A. KzNNiCOTT.
                For the Wisconsin & Iowa Farmer.
             Raising Calves.
  A short time since I saw an article witt
the above heading, going the rounds of the
papers, from the N. Y. Farmer, stating thas
Mr. D. M. Crowell raised calves, which, at te,
months old would weigh 500 lbs. He fed
them on sour milk till fall, when they wern
stabled and fed on hay &d meal. This is i
large story, but from my experience, I am in
A,,opdc tn hblieve it is true.
manfy nelds ou       1 OU tU    -- -cre, -.       Ws.r     - -- -- --
containing nearly or quite a full " section."-  A few years ago
I had two heifers calv4
The rows are straight, and can be seen a mile one in June and one in July.
Having as ml
off-The straight line is very stiflf and indeed, ny cows to milk as my help
desired to attend
almost inadmissible in landscape gardening.but to, and not relishing the
idea of breing i
in farming it is essential and beautiful, and I  heifers, I concluded to
try an experimene
aids the after cultivation of the corn crop not and let the calves run with
their mothers, wit
a little, by admitting the free and efficient a view to raise a yoke of oxen
for my ow
use of the two horse wheeled-cultivators or use. They took the entire milk,
and by fa
double-shovel plows, by which one man is sav- the calves found it necessary
to get on to the
ed, d better work performed.               knees to obtain the mi&l 
The heifers drie
I _  -
I


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