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Dexheimer, Florence Chambers, 1866-1925 / Sketches of Wisconsin pioneer women
([1924?] )

Janes, Jennie
Mrs. Arthur M. Janes,   pp. 22-25 PDF (830.7 KB)


Page 22


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            MRS. ARTHUR M. JANES
                Author-Jennie Janes
                       Antigo
   ....... ...........-..................... ..... .............................
   It is with a feeling of deep appreciation of the honor
the D. A. R. Chapter of Antigo have extended to me in
asking for my personal history for the national D. A. R.
publication "Pioneer Sketches of Wisconsin Women,"
that I write these lines.
    My father, Christopher Hill, was born in the state
of New York in 1835, and my mother, Rachel Rice, was
born of English parents in a village near Quebec, Canada,
in 1838. Both having come to the village of Winneconne,
Wisconsin with their parents, they met and were married
in 1856.
    I was born on January 31, 1860.
    The first memory I have of my father was his return
from the Civil War. Like most men who gave themselves
to their country at that time, he had to make a new start
in life and with his family came to Northern Wisconsin,
settling on land near Clintonville, where he made a home
and for a few years was quite a successful farmer and
lumber operator.
    Most people of northern Wisconsin are quite fanil-
iar with the old military road. It was constructed dur-
ing the Civil War for military purposes, but it proved to
be the gateway to the wonderful pine and hardwood
forests of that section of the state and especially of Lang-
lade County. It seems that a great part of this road was
built over old Indian trails and is known among tourists
of the present day as the Indian Trail.
    During the early 70's, after the pine forests of cen-
tral Wisconsin had become depleted, the large lumber
companies turned their attention to the great tracts of
timber lands north of the Menominee Indian Reservation.
This reservation was something over twenty miles across
and as no white people were allowed to live within its
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