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Dexheimer, Florence Chambers, 1866-1925 / Sketches of Wisconsin pioneer women
([1924?] )

Burnham, John B., Mrs.
Mrs. Samuel Brown,   pp. 124-125 PDF (405.8 KB)


Page 124


........ . .... . .....................I.......I................ . ........I....................................................t
-            MRS. SAMUEL BROWN
-         Author-Mrs. John B. Burnham
                    Milwaukee
           A Pioneer Woman of Wisconsin
A Sketch of the Life of Mrs. Samuel Brown, a Former
         Resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
    Clarissa Hoyt Brown was the daughter of Thomas
and Susannah Demerritt Hoyt and was born at Tufton-
borough, N. H. on the 37th of June, 1813. She remained
at Tuftonborough until 1833, when she accompanied her
parents to Chicago. There she made the acquaintance
of Mr. Brown, to whom she was joined in marriage, Feb-
ruary 3, 1834. The newly wedded pair remained at Chi-
cago until the following spring, when, having decided to
make their future home in Milwaukee-Mr. Brown hav-
ing made a claim at Milwaukee in December, 1834-they
came to take posession, arriving in March, 1835. On
their journey to Milwaukee, Mr. and Mrs. Brown left
Chicago on Monday morning, traveling with an ox team,
and reached Walker's Point at sunset, Saturday, and be-
ing very firm in the belief that the Sabbath began with
sunset on Saturday, they spent Sunday there, although
their destination was at Killbourntown. Mrs. Brown
was the first white woman to make wheat bread in Mil-
waukee. She had the honor of being the first Anglo-Sax-
on woman to make a permanent home in the then embryo
city. To the day of her death, she occupied a prominent
place among her sister pioneers, as a woman of great
worth of character and a model wife and mother.
    Mrs. Brown was possessed of a strong mind and a
dignity of manner that would win the confidence as well
as the respect of all with whom she became associated.
She was gentle in manner, true to every correct principle,
and, like her honored husband, always a safe counselor.
In the promotion of the cause of religion she was promin-
ent, and unless prevented by sickness, would always be
                        124


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