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Dexheimer, Florence Chambers, 1866-1925 / Sketches of Wisconsin pioneer women
([1924?] )

Bertrand, H. May
Pioneer women of Superior,   p. 87 PDF (183.6 KB)


Page 87


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       PIONEER WOMEN OF SUPERIOR
              -  Author-H. May Bertrand     is-
                      Superior
 ................... ..........  ,,.,,,.,,.,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,.......
  , .. ..............
   Among the pioneer women who came to Northern
Wisconsin the names of these three stand out as ex-
amples of the true pioneer spirit: Mrs. I. W. Gates, Mrs.
J. F. Smith and Mrs. R.G. Coburn.
    Coming to the Northern Wilderness in 1856 from
homes of comfort and the luxuries of life, they bravely
carried their share of the burdens of a wild region and
made for themselves a place in the heart of the com-
munity.
    Coming to Superior with their husbands who were
prominent business men they shared in entertaining many
noted men of history.
    When Abraham Lincoln and Secretary Steward
made their trip to the northern boundary of Canada and
the United States one of these women entertained them
in her home.
    These women were charter members of one of the
Churches, organizing the first Missionary Society and
the circulating library, as well as looking after the cares
of their households.
    Mrs. Gates' home was on a farm in a log cabin
which was replaced by a handsome house in town, here
she cared for her seven small children.
    Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Coburn lived in town, both had
five small children to care for.
    Mrs. Gates was educated at Mt. Holyoke Seminary,
Mrs. Coburn in New York and Mrs. Smith in Indiana.
    They were close friends and shared their joys and
sorrows together for fifty years. Their lives were lives
of service and no one could come within the radiance of
their smiling graciousness without being better for the
acquaintance.
                         87


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