University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The State of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

McLeod, Donald / History of Wiskonsan, from its first discovery to the present period, including a geological and topographical description of the territory with a correct catalogue of all its plants
(1846)

Chapter XVI,   pp. 275-297 PDF (3.8 MB)


Page 275


HISTORY OF W8ISONSAN.
  Pine river runs through this county, from north to
south, discharging into the Wiskonsan below Helena.
Twenty miles above its confluencc, it has a cascade,
over which the rocks are united, forming a natural
bridge. At its junction with the Wiskonsan, it is thirty
yards wide, and is navigable for canoes nearly its
whole length.
                 CHAPTER XVI.
  Saint Croix County, is bounded on the north by
Canada, cast by Michigan, south by Crawford, and
west by Iowa territory. It embraces a large irregular
extent of country, most of which is yet but imperfect-
ly known. It was set off from Crawford, and organ-
ized as a separate county in 1840, at which time its
population was eight hundred and nine, and in 1842,
nine hundred and sixty-nine. The county scat is
Dacota.
   This county abounds in rivers and lakes. The river
 St. Croix is one of the largest, and discharges into the
 Mississippi a few miles above lake Pepin. and fifty-nine
 miles below the falls of St.. Anthony. Its length is
 about two hundred miles. It has its source in the
 upper St. Croix lake, at the northeast of which there
 is a portage of two miles, over a dry pine ridge, seven
 hundred feet high, which connects it with the head
 waters of the Bois Brule, of lake Superior. A number
 of the western branches of the St. Croix river are
            ve n ar iting with the wentrs of aum river, It
275
  Pine river runs through this county. from north to
south, discharging into the Wiskonsan Lelow Helena.
Twenty miles above its confluencc, it has a cascade,
over which the rocks are united, forming a natural
bridge. At its junction with the Wiskonsan, it is thirty
ards wide, and is navigable for canoes nearly its
whole lcn,,th.
                 CHAPTER XVI.
  Saint Croix County, is bounded on the north by
Canada, cast by Michigan, south by Crawford, and
west by Iowa territory. It embraces a large irregular
extent of country, most of which is yet but imperfect-
ly known. It was set off from Crawford, and organ-
ized as a separate county in 1840, at which time its
population was eight hundred and nine, and in 1842,
nine hundred and sixty-nine. The county seat is
Dacota.
   This county abounds in rivers and lakes. The river
 St. Croix is one of the largest, and discharges into the
 Mississippi a few miles above lake Pepin. and fifty-nine
 miles below the falls of St.. Anthony. Its length is
 about two hundred miles. It has its source in the
 upper St. Croix lake, at the northeast of which there
 is a portage of two miles, over a dry pinc ridge, seven
 hundred feet high, which connects it with the head
 waters of the Bois Brule, of lake Superior. A number
 of the western branches of the St. Croix river are
 very near uniting with the waters of Rum river. It


Go up to Top of Page