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The history of Columbia County, Wisconsin, containing an account of its settlement, growth, development and resources; an extensive and minute sketch of its cities, towns and villages--their improvements, industries, manufactories, churches, schools and societies; its war record, biographical sketches, portraits of prominent men and early settlers; the whole preceded by a history of Wisconsin, statistics of the state, and an abstract of its laws and constitution and of the constitution of the United States
(1880)

Chapter VIII,   pp. 499-530 PDF (16.1 MB)


Page 499


HISTORY OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
                                 CHAPTER VIIT.
SONE OF COLUMBIA COUNTY'S ILLUSTRIOUS DEAD-PETER PAUQUETTE, ELBERT DICKASON,
LA FAY-
     ETTE HILL, JohN A. BROWN, JEREMIAH DRAKE, JOSEPH M. DOTY,'BARON STEUBEN
DOTY,
     WILLIAM T. WHIRRY, EMMoNs TAYLOR, JACOB Low, CARL HAERTEL, WILLIAM WIER,
     SQUIRE SHERWOOD CASE, JOHN CONVERSE, ALFRED TOPLIFF, HARRISON S. HASKELL,
SAMUEL
     STEPHEN BRANNýAN, ANDREW DUNN, THOMAS J. EMVIERTON, J OSEPH BAILEY,
HENRY MERRELL,
     JULIUS CONVERSE CHANDLER, SAMUEL K. VAUGHAN, JOSEPH KERR, JOHN PARDEE,
ANDREW
     SWEANY.
                                   PETER PAUQUETTE
was the son of a French father and a Winnebago mother. He was born in the
year 1796, and
was married in St. Louis in 1818'to Theresa Crelie, whose father, "old
Crelie," was a Canadian
half-breed, and whose mother was a half-breed Sac. At the date of his marriage,
which event
took place at Prairie du Chien, he was in the employ of the American Fur
Company. Pau-
quette was the interpreter at the treaties with the Winnebagoes at Green
Bay, in 1828; at
Prairie du Chien, in 1825; and at Rock Island in 1832. In the year last mentioned,
he was
active in raising a party of Winnebagoes to unite with the Americans against
Black Hawk.
After this war, he was engaged as a trader, on the west side of the Wisconsin,
at Portage. He
had two children-Therese J., the eldest, was born at the portage in 1826;
she has been twice
married, and is a resident of Columbia County. Her brother, Moses Pauquette,
was born in
1828, also at the portage; and he, too, is still a resident of the county.
     Pauquette was always reputed to be one of the best friends and counselors
of the Winne-
bagoes. No man who knew him ever suspected his honesty or patriotism. In
October, 1836,
he was shot and killed at the portage, by an Indian.
     On the 17th of October, [1836], says John de La Ronde, "1Gov. Dodge
came to Portage to
hold a council with the Indians; H. L. Dousman and Joseph Brisbois came also
; Peter Pau-
quette acted as interpreter. The result of the council was advising the Winnebagoes
to sell
their lands east of the Mississippi. The Indians could not agree, and the
matter was postponed
until the next year, and a treaty for the sale of the land was abandoned,
they preferring an
annuity, and Peter Pauquptte demanded for them twenty-one boxes of money-$21,000-declar¢
ing that that was the amount due him from the Indians for goods and provisions
advanced
to them.
     "Man-ze-mon-e-ka, a son of one of the chiefs of the Rock River
band, residing a mile or
two above the present locality of Watertown, named Wau-kon-ge-we-ka, or Whirling
Thunder,
or One-who-walks-on-the-iron, objected on the ground that he belonged to
the Rock River band,
and had received no provisions or goods from Pauquette, desiring that the
money should be
divided between the several bands; then those who were indebted to Pauquette,
might pay him
if they chose, as for himself, or his band, they had their own debts to pay
to the traders at Rock
River. The result was that the council dissolved without coming to a decision.
     "Pauquette crossed the Wisconsin, going to a saloon where Carpenter's
house now stands,
 and there indulged in drinking. Man-ze-mon-e-ka, who had spoken so frankly
in the council,
 also happened there, when Pauquette whipped him. I came there at the time,
and with the
 help of others rescued the Indian from Pauquette. The chief retired to the
other end of the
 portage, near Where the house of Henry Merrell once stood, on Fox River;
Pauquette followed
 him there and whipped him again. Satterlee Clark and I took the Indian away
from him again,
 who was by this time badly bruised. He went home, which was near where Armstrong's
brickyard
 now is ; and Pauquette went to the old post of the American Fur Company
near the grist-mill;
 and while on his way home, between 1 and 2 o'clock in the morning, he stopped
at my place.
499


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