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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLII ([covers January 1963/July 1963])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLII, no. 7,   pp. [25]-32 ff. PDF (5.5 MB)


Page [25]


IdrcS51O-tIWAr
M
CROP and
C. D. Caparoon, In Char,
N. L. Brereton
REPORTER
STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE         ji'j'i  WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE
C>.*I.L.c        -.I.4                              -.       Aretu-- -A
ge                                                             C. A. Hines,
Asst. In Charge
Agricultural Statisticians
C. W. LeGrande              G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
L. E. Krahn
Vol. XLII, No. 7                 Box 351, Madison, Wisconsin            
          July, 1963
C ROP CONDITIONS on July 1
varied considerably from one part of
the state to another. And for the state
as a whole crop production this year
may not come up to the volume re-
corded for 1962.
Wisconsin farmers finished most
of their plowing and planting ahead
of schedule this spring. But weather
conditions in June were unfavorable
to crop progress in many areas of the
state. June weather was made up of
unusually low and high temperatures
with a little too much rain in some of
the northern areas of the state and
near-drought conditions in many of
the southern counties.
An appraisal of Wisconsin's pros-
pects for feed and forage supplies
should be prefaced with a survey of
stocks of hay and grain on hand from
previous crops. Last year Wisconsin
farmers harvested their largest crop
of tame hay. And on May 1 this year
stocks of hay on farms were estimated
at more than 21/2 million tons. These
stocks were 54 percent larger than a
year earlier and 37 percent above
average for May 1. While admittedly
not of the best quality, this hay will
make up for some of the reduced
1963 crop.
Carryover of the two most impor-
tant feed crops is smaller than a year
ago and average. Stocks of corn on
Wisconsin farms on July 1 are esti-
mated at nearly 29 million bushels
and stocks of oats at a little over 261/2
million bushels. These farm stocks
of corn are 28 percent below July 1
last year and 17 percent under aver-
age for the date. Stocks of oats are
15 percent below a year ago and 9
percent less than average.
Weather Summary, June, 1963
Temperature      Precipitation
Station                         _
Superior   31  96  59   59.1 3.45 3.94  -2.88
Spooner    31  96  66   64.8 2.11 4.39  -4.24
Park Falas 33  95  64   62.7 3.42 5.44  -4.27
R'nlander 35   97  66   63.4 2.49 4.68  -5.53
Medford   33   92  65   63.4 2.89 5.18  -4.31
Marinette  38  96  68   66.0 1.61 3.57  -2.80
Antigo    35   94  67   64.3 3.07 4.40  -3.21
Amery     36   93  68   65.5 4.73 4.79 +0.77
Riv. Falls  39  99  70  66.8 2.47 4.80  -3.16
La Crosse  45  98  71   68.8 2.35 4.20  -4.76
Hatfield
Dam      32  98  67   66.2 3.33 4.91  -2.35
M'rs'field  35  87  65  64.6 5.88 4.74  -1.03
Hancock   33   96  69   66.9 3.70 4.31  -1.86
Oshkosh   39   94  69   67.2 1.32 3.90  -2.36
Gr. Bay   40   92  68   64.5 2.67 3.36  -3.41
Portage   42   95  71   69.2 3.82 3.96  .3.35
S'boygan  43   91  64   64.3 3.13 3.79  -3.40
Mn'towoc 39    90  64   64.5 2.26 3.66  -3.22
Lancaster  43  97  71   68.5 3.00 4.93  -5.88
D'rlingt'n 39  95  70   67.6 3.79 4.77  -4.79
Hillsboro  36  97  70   67.1 2.55 4.30  -4.41
Madison   39   94  70   66.1 8.15 3.95 +0.89
Beloit    43   96  72   69.9 4.17 4.24  -3.90
Lake
Geneva  39   95  70   68.0 2.51 4.46  55.28
Milwa'kee
(airport)  38  93  66  63.3 1.50 3.64  -5.58
Av. for 25
stations  37.4 94.6 67.6 65.7 3.21 4.33  -3.37
Based on reports from Wisconsin
farmers on July 1, the state may have
about the same size corn crop as
harvested last year, but oat production
may be 2 percent smaller. Larger
crops of barley and wheat are in pros-
pect, but smaller crops than a year
ago are indicated for rye and flax-
seed.
NOTICE TO     READERS                                |
Because of a reduction in State funds, publication of the Wisconsin Crop
and Live-
stock Reporter is being discontinued with this issue (Volume 42, Number 7).
It is
d,   planned to incorporate some of the data appearing in this publication
into other releases
of the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture. Readers will be informed of proposed
2    changes at a later date, and we will then seek your opinion.       
            ,
Donald N. McDowell, Director       ,p
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture    X
,0 -
IN THIS ISSUE
July Crop Report
As of July 1, crop con-
ditions varied considerably
through Wisconsin. Pasture
conditions for the state on
July 1 were under a year
ago and the average. The
corn crop may be about the
same as last year, while oats
and hay likely will be
smaller.
Milk Production
Milk output on Wiscon-
sin farms in June was above
a year earlier, while out-
put for the first half of this
year was about the same
as a year ago.
Egg Production
June egg output for the
state was off 9 percent
from June a year ago.
Prices Farmers Receive & Pay
The June index of prices
received by W i s c o n s i n
farmers was the same as a
year ago.
Agricultural Price Trends Chart
Features
.
..W
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