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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLII ([covers January 1963/July 1963])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLII, no. 6,   pp. [21]-24 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page [21]


OHS Larjc n %-
CROP and
STATE DOCLM1ENT
O A ATIVI7
et-   RI:Eiti?1N.:  F3U7 EAU
MADISON I2
REPORTER      Af. iLMP
5TATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                  WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE
Statistlieal Repimtno Service        .                Dio Isin of Agricultural
Statistics
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
N. L. Brereton
Agricultural Statisticians
C. W. LeGrande             G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge
L. E Krahn
Vol. XLII, No. 6                Box 351, Madison, Wisconsin             
         June, 1963
SPRING PLANTING was w e 11
ahead of schedule on most farms this
year. But crop progress was slowed
during May because of lack of mois-
ture and low temperatures. And crop
prospects were not as favorable on
June 1, as they were a month earlier.
At the beginning of June last year
condition figures reported by farmers
for hay and pasture averaged the
highest on record for the date. June
1 reports this year indicate pasture
and hay conditions are below a year
ago and the June 1 average. June 1
conditions average 83 percent of nor-
mal for hay and 82 percent for pas-
ture for the state as a whole. Condi-
tions of hay and nstsure for the
nation average lower than for Wiscon-
sin and are also below a year ago.
Condition of Crops on June I
Wisconsin    United States
5-yr. I5-yr.
Crop            avr, 1963     ave| 1962 aver
161921957-  9316 1957-
61            61
As percent of total
Rye   ..........  88  95  89  80  84  87
Al hay      83  99  86    78  83  86
Alfalfa hay  84  99  87   81  87  87
Clover &
timothy hay. 86  99  84   79  82  88
Wild hay    84  95  86    79  83  81
Pasture ........ 82  98  84  76  78  87
Most of the corn acreage in the
state was planted by June 1 with
some of the work done two weeks
ahead of schedule. Occasional reports
of replanting frost-nipped corn were
made on June 1. Some fields in the
north were still being planted with
peas and potatoes by June 1, and
transplanting of tobacco seedlings had
not started.
The general freeze on May 22 and
23 caused some damage to fruits as
well as corn. The strawberry bloom
was hit at the critical time and dam-
age varied widely. Some damage is
reported to the apple and cherry
orchards.
The Nation's Crop Outlook
Prospects for winter wheat declined
duhrinp Mav hpbeasep of continuipd drv
weather in   parts
Plains and frosts
Plains. But the cr
cent above 1962
wheat crop may be.
Seedings of row cro
gress in May. The
crop may be 8 p
year while the ea
may be 1 percent
soybean plantings v
schedule.
Pasture Rents
Up
Pasture rents arf
ago in Wisconsin. }
$6.70 per acre was
reporters for this
rental rate average
and in 1961 it was $
year's rate is 90 c(
ago and $1.15 above
The indicated IS
ably will vary by ar
ing prevailing rate
Also, t h e weath
through pasture con
deteriorate pasture
demand for rente
course raises rates.
Weather Summary, May 1963
I   Temperature
Station
Superior
Spaooner
Park Falls
R'nlander
Medford
Marinette
Antigo
Amery
Riv. Falls
La Crosse
Hatfield
Dam
M'rs'field
Hancock
Osbkosh
Gr. Bay
Portage
S'boygan
Mn'towoc
Lancaster
D'rlingt'n
Hillsboro
Madison
Beloit
Lake
Geneva
Milwa'kee
(airmort)
Av. for 25
stations
't .0a
a  t
0--M
21   85
23   85
26   50
23   51
25   80
24   84
26   80
27   88
29   87
32   85
19   85
26   81
22   85
28   83
27   83
31   87
31   87
26   82
27   86
23   87
24   83
27   84
32   87
28   83
24   84
26. 842
0
50
53
49
53
53
53
53
55
57
58
55
53
55
55
54
57
53
52
58
57
55
55
59
56
52
54.4
l
49.6
55.4
53.2
53.8
54.2
55-3
55.1
56.3
57.3
59.2
56.9
55.3
57.0
56.8
54.3
59.6
53-5
54.1
59.1
58.0
57.4
56.1
60.2
57.8
53.4
56.0
I Precipitation
I      I
0
S
0
2.32
2.57
2.72
2.86
3.75
4.00
3.37
4-39
4.14
2.04
2.97
3.67
2.53
3.27
1.54
1.99
2.83
3.59
2.12
1.84
2.34
1.82
1.67
1.91
1.95
2.73
z
3.84
3.37
3.52
3 .50
4.03
3.09
3.50
3-55
3.84
3.76
4.04
3.79
3.81
2.95
3.06
3.22
312
2.83
3.85
3.69
3.64
3.34
3.59
3.69
3.16
3.51
.2.39
-1.96
-2.25
-3.34
-2.02
-0.84
-1.88
+0.83
0.83
-2.91
-0.77
-2.17
-1.25
+0.22
-2.72
-3.21
-2.74
-1 .82
-3.95
-3.81
-2.66
-3.31
-3.83
-3-33
-3.44
-2.25
Of the Central   Cows Reverse Trend
in the Northern   With Higher May Output
op may be 5 per-    May marks the first month this
while the spring  year that milk production on Wiscon-
less than last year.  sin farms has been higher than in the
ps made good pro-  corresponding month of 1962. While
late spring potato  dairy herds produced about 1 percent
ercent above last  more milk than they did in May last
rly summer crop   year, total production for the first five
lower. Corn and   months is slightly lower.
vere well ahead of  Dairy herds in the state produced
1,860 million pounds of milk in May
and 8,139 million pounds in the first
five months of this year. Milk pro-
duction in May was 1 percent above
up from a year   the 5-year average for the month.
An average rate of  Milk production in Wisconsin dairy
indicated by crop  herds averaged 870 pounds per cow
year. The 1962   during May. This is 5 pounds above
d $5.80 per acre  the May 1962 production and 31
5.55 per acre. This  pounds above average for the month.
'ats above a year  Milk production per cow was the
3 two years ago.  highest on record for May even
163 average prob-  though pasture feed supplies were be-
reas as long-stand-  low a year ago and the May average.
levels may differ.  Pastures were lush last year and
er affects rates  much chopped green feed was also
ditions. Dry spells  supplied dairy cattle.
gad.,ncreaRe the    This year Wisconsin farmers are
Mtxties. This of A' eeding record quantities of grains and
concentrates. On June I the amount
j   .  6    1, 9 3
LEGISLATIVL-
D- _!t
IN THIS ISSUE
June Crop Report
Hay and pasture condi-
tions i n Wisconsin were
below June 1 a year ago.
Spring planting was gener-
ally ahead of schedule.
There was some frost dam-
age to corn and fruits.
Milk Production
Production on the state's
farms for May exceeded
May a year ago. May milk
output at 870 pounds per
cow was 5 pounds over a
year earlier.
Egg Production
Wisconsin egg produc-
tion during May was 8 per-
cent below May 1962. Layer
numbers were down sharp-
ly, but rate of lay was up
a little.
Prices Farmers Receive & Pay
The index of prices re-
ceived by the state's farm-
ers in May was 1 percent
under a year ago. The in-
dex of prices paid was a
record high for the month.
Agricultural Price Trends Chart
Features
II
I
l
_
, . ^ ,
. _ _
. _.
l _
-2.25
at.
I
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