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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XLII ([covers January 1963/July 1963])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XLII, no. 2,   pp. [5]-8 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page [5]


~ L r ~ s 5 1O ' U S
CROP
DEPARTMENT
..S.ieUl - l-rS..
REPORTER
ISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Division of Agriculturol Statistics
C. D. Caparoon, In Charge
Agricultural Statisticians
C. W. LeGrande,           G. N. Tucker, Jr.,
V. C. Struck,
C. A. Hines, Asst. In Charge
Vol. XLII, No. 2                 Box 351, Madison, Wisconsin            
      February, 1963
LIVESTOCK INVENTORY figures
for the first of this year show Wiscon-
sin farmers have more cattle and
swine than a year ago while the num-
ber of all sheep and lambs. chickens,
and turkeys is smaller. Changes in
both number and value per head have
combined to lower the total value of
all livestock on farms to $804,661,000
or 2 percent below January 1 last
year.
The preliminary estimate based on
reports from farmers indicates on
January 1 Wisconsin's dairy cattle in-
cludes 1 percent more milk cows two
years oAd and over while the number
of heifers one to two years and heifer
calves remains the same as last year.
After holding constant for the past
three years, Wisconsin's milk cow
numbers rose slightly to 2,426,000
head at the beginning of this year. A
slight rise is also indicated for beef
cattle. The total number of all cattle
on farms in the state is estimated at
4,382.000 head.
With the average farm value per
head below last year more than off-
setting the increase in cattle num-
bers, the total farm value of all cattle
on Wisconsin farms estimated at
$736.176 000 is 2 percent below Janu-
ary 1, 1962. The value of Wisconsin's
milk cows accounted for 72 percent of
the total value of all cattle and 66 per-
cent of the value of all livestock.
A drop of 2 percent from a year
ago is reported for the nation's milk
cow numbers. This is the lowest num-
ber since 1907. But the increase of
6 percent in the number of beef cattle
brought the total cattle population in
the nation to 4 percent above a year
ago and the highest on record for
January 1.
With more brood sows and late fall
and early spring pigs on Wisconsin
farms, the total swine population in
the state is 3 percent above a year
ago and the highest count since Jan-
uary 1, 1960. The increased hog
numbers more than offset a drop in
the value per head of Wisconsin swine,
and the total value of $52,954,000 is
up slightly from a year ago.
For the nation, the swine popula-
tion rose 3 percent from a year ago
to the highest count since 1960. This
increase includes 5 percent more pigs
under six months of age and 3 percent
more sows and gilts than on January
1 last year, but the number of hogs
six months and older was down 3 per-
cent.
Farm chicken numbers, this ex-
cludes commercial broilers, dropped
sharply from a year ago to 9.673,000
birds the first of this year. This is
the smallest number on Wisconsin
farms of record. Total value of all
farm chickens is estimated at $11,-
124,000. Farmers in the state also had
272.000 turkeys on January 1 - about
2,000 less than a year ago. The tur-
key population is valued at over 1
million dollars. Estimates for the na-
tion show 1 percent fewer chickens
but 2 percent more turkeys than a
year ago.
Fall Potato Supply
Is Below Last Year
Growers in Wisconsin and other
states producing the 1962 fall potato
crop probably will find a good market
in the coming months for the remain-
der of their crop. Storage potatoes
Weather Summary, January, 1963
Station
Superior
Spooner
Park Falls
R'nlander
Medford
Marinette
Antigo
Amery
Riv. Falls
La Crosse
Hatfield
Dam
M'rs'field
Hancock
Oshkosh
Gr. Bay
Portage
S'boygan
Mn'towoc
Lancaster
D'rlingt'n
Hillsboro
Madison
Beloit
Lake
Geneva
Milw'kee
(airport)
Av. for 25
stations
Temperature
-33
.34
-34
-34
-36
-26
-32
-38
-31
.31
-47
-37
-40
-28
-27
-35
-22
-26
-31
-35
-34
-30
-23
-23
-24
-31.6
. i
42
38
38
36
38
40
35
40
40
43
42
36
40
40
39
40
40
42
43
43
42
36
43
40
38
39.8
i
01
4
2
3
3
10
4
3
4
6
4
3
4
7
7
8
12
10
8
7
4
S
10
11
9
6.0
z
12.6
12.2
12.4
13.0
13.3
20.2
15.7
12.2
13.4
16.5
15.1
14.5
16.1
18.6
16.3
20.2
21.4
21.9
19.5
20.1
17.9
18.0
22.9
21.5
20.6
17.0
Precipitation
0.06 0.97  -0.91
0.23 0.74  -0.51
0.41 1.09  -0.68
0.30 1.20  -0.90
0.57 1.19  -0.62
0.67 1.46  -0.79
0.29 1.19  -0.90
0.38 0.73  -0.35
0.54 0.90  -0.36
0.67 1.19  -0.52
0.66 0.90  -0.24
0.30 1.20  .0.90
0.32 0.98  .0.66
0.62 1.29  -0.67
0.68 1.15  -0.47
0.62 1.38  -0.76
0.72 1.63  -0.91
0.51 1.46  -0.95
0.60 1.29  -0.69
0.48 1.35  -0.87
0.38 1.11  .0.73
0.76 1.40  -0.64
0.52 1.63  -1.11
0.93 1.73  -0.80
0.66 1.83  -1.17
0.52 1.24  -0.72
may be in better demand than a year
ago because of the smaller prospective
supply of new crop winter potatoes.
The Februarv I forecast of winter
potatoes of 3,840,000 hundredweight
is 8 percent below last year's produc-
tion and a fifth below the 5-year aver-
age. Potato digging began in Florida
late in December. Harvest in Dade
County may begin in mid-February
where yield prospects are mostly good.
Harvest in the Perris-Hemet areas of
Riverside County, California was slow
the first of February.
Wisconsin growers have been re-
porting a good disappearance of their
fall potatoes. On February 1, growers
and dealers had only 2 550,000 hun-
dredweight on hand or 66 percent of
their 1962 fall production. Stocks of
potatoes in the state on February 1
were 9 percent below a year ago be-
cause of the lower production and the
increased demand for the crop.
Stocks of fall potatoes held by grow-
ers and dealers in the 26 renorting
states are estimated at 92,975,000 hun-
dredweight. These Februory 0**
ings were 4 per nt less than a year
ago.
1MAJ     6    7 9i
IN THIS ISSUE
1963 Livestock Inventory
Wisconsin farmers have
more cattle and swine, but
fewer sheep and lambs,
chickens and turkeys than a
year ago. Total value of all
cattle and calves on Wiscon-
sin farms on January 1,
1963 was $804,661,000.
Milk Production
January milk production
declined 2 percent com-
pared with the same month
last year for Wisconsin but
was 3 percent above the
average for t h e month.
Very cold weather affected
output per cow.
Egg Production
Total egg output on Wis-
consin farms during Janu-
ary was 5 percent under
January last year and layers
on hand were a record low
for the month.
Farm Prices
The January index of
prices received by Wiscon-
sin farmers was 4 percent
under January last year
while the index of prices
paid was a record high.
Agricultural Price Trend Chart
l
.
. .
Or1
L. E. Krahn
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